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View Full Version : are single action revolvers DOJ exempt?


duenor
02-06-2008, 8:18 AM
I tried looking but couldnt find reliable data.
I want to bring into the state via Mail to my FFL an 1875 Remington Single Action Army. (actually an EMF 1875 Outlaw replica)

Is this exempt from the roster?

FortCourageArmory
02-06-2008, 8:19 AM
In short....yes your Remington 1875 is exempt from the Safe Handgun Roster.

WolfMansDad
02-06-2008, 9:59 AM
Yes, even modern reproduction single-action revolvers are exempt from the "safe-handgun" list requirement. However, they are still considered firearms, and all other applicable laws apply.

MrTuffPaws
02-06-2008, 10:00 AM
You could always go for a black powder SA. They aren't considered firearms.

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 11:37 AM
You could always go for a black powder SA. They aren't considered firearms.

Muzzleloading, true. But cartridge black powder revolvers are still considered firearms, I believe.
Here is what appears to be a real 1873 Colt 3rd generation Single Action Army revolver, and they note "MODERN HANDGUN RULES APPLY".

http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_23_26&products_id=62

I am guessing that C&R would change this some, but still under modern rules.

jammer2k
02-06-2008, 11:42 AM
Muzzleloading, true. But cartridge black powder revolvers are still considered firearms, I believe.
Here is what appears to be a real 1873 Colt 3rd generation Single Action Army revolver, and they note "MODERN HANDGUN RULES APPLY".

http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_23_26&products_id=62

I am guessing that C&R would change this some, but still under modern rules.

Not quite, bought a replica 1851 Navy (almost identical to This (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=null-cat20817&rid=&indexId=cat20817&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=0&parentType=index&parentId=cat20817&id=0006186&cmCat=netcon&cm_ven=netcon&cm_cat=N/A&cm_pla=N/A&cm_ite=netcon)). Walked out of the store in 20 minutes, no DROS and no wait period.

Sutcliffe
02-06-2008, 11:44 AM
Not all, but the most prominant example, Colt SAA and repros couldn't pass the test and are unsafe to carry fully loaded.
Words fail to describe the absolute morons who voted this into law.

bwiese
02-06-2008, 11:49 AM
I tried looking but couldnt find reliable data.
I want to bring into the state via Mail to my FFL an 1875 Remington Single Action Army. (actually an EMF 1875 Outlaw replica)

Is this exempt from the roster?

Most likely.

12133PC governs some of the exemptions to Roster, including single-action revolvers.

Such exempt revolvers must
hold 5 or more rounds;
min. 3" barrel length;
min. 7.5" overall length measured parallel to bore;
Political note: hile the SA exemption to the Rostering process/testing is nice it existsbecause SASS leadership and Kathy Lynch/Gerry Upholt (contract lobbyist for CAFR, CRPA and other 'gun groups') sold us out.

The margin was slim and if we'd had a unified pro-gun front w/NRA, SB15 would NOT have passed - and we'd then have nothing to be 'exempt' from!

And you've seen what they keep doing to the structure set up by SB15 - mag discos, LCIs and now microstamping.

scrat
02-06-2008, 3:17 PM
black powder the way to go. Its the silent firearm. i have several. if you look at purchasing a good quality bp handgun like an 1860army or a 1847 walker. Uberti is a good maker. You can purchase and R&D drop in cylinder. Here is the silent firearm. With the original cylinder you shoot black powder, the walker shooting 60 grains of black powder was the Magnum of its time. A very powerfull handgun. Shooting black powder. Very strong steel framed handgun. Now you purchase an R&D cylinder. Remove the wedge. load the cylinder. put in the R&D and now your shooting regular cartridge shells. I have a Uberti 44 Walker. Changing the cylinder allows me to shoot 45long colt.


No dros no ffl. pay the cash shoot it in black powder. purchase a cylinder then start shooting cartridges. After the civil war companys like colt would charge 5.00 to retro your 1860 or 1851 to shoot cartridges. Later on when the piece maker and other firearms were made these bp handguns became obsolete. Only a handfull of places make cylinders today that can replace the existing cylinder in a bp handgun to shoot cartridges. Drawback though it has to be a good quality bp handgun and steel frame. Those flashy brass handguns will not hold up to the pressure of shooting cartridges.

GuyW
02-06-2008, 3:30 PM
...cartridge black powder revolvers are still considered firearms, I believe.
Here is what appears to be a real 1873 Colt 3rd generation Single Action Army revolver, and they note "MODERN HANDGUN RULES APPLY".


As the link said, "3rd Generation, serial number SA53284, made in 1981..."

This is a smokeless powder, modern gun.

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 3:45 PM
Not quite, bought a replica 1851 Navy (almost identical to This (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=null-cat20817&rid=&indexId=cat20817&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=0&parentType=index&parentId=cat20817&id=0006186&cmCat=netcon&cm_ven=netcon&cm_cat=N/A&cm_pla=N/A&cm_ite=netcon)). Walked out of the store in 20 minutes, no DROS and no wait period.

Yes, quite. Muzzleloader, eh? I sit uncorrected.

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 3:49 PM
As the link said, "3rd Generation, serial number SA53284, made in 1981..."

This is a smokeless powder, modern gun.

Oops! Didn't see that 1981 bit.

I just picked that at random. I have seen others on there which I also thought to be old ones and it said the same thing.

So I don't know about original 1873 SAAs. C&R is another story. If a regular non-FFL joe tries to buy an ancient cartridge black powder gun, I don't know if it requires modern handgun rules.

dfletcher
02-06-2008, 3:49 PM
Muzzleloading, true. But cartridge black powder revolvers are still considered firearms, I believe.
Here is what appears to be a real 1873 Colt 3rd generation Single Action Army revolver, and they note "MODERN HANDGUN RULES APPLY".

http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_23_26&products_id=62

I am guessing that C&R would change this some, but still under modern rules.

Maybe the wrong link is being pulled up. That particular 1873 was manufactured in 1981.

scrat
02-06-2008, 4:02 PM
If a regular non-FFL joe tries to buy an ancient cartridge black powder gun, I don't know if it requires modern handgun rules.

NOPE

first you have define bp and cartridge. like i mentioned earlier bp muzzle loading rifles, shotguns, handguns require no dros or ffl. Some bp handguns can be made to shoot regular cartridges. Most recomend either very light smoke less loads. Or the original way which is bpcr. Black powder cartridge rifle or handgun. So the question after that is up to you. did you want to pay $1595 from dixie guns for that 1873 replica. Did you want to shoot bp or just single action. if your looking for single action you may want a new style gun. if your looking to shoot bp. Your better off getting an older style gun. if you do not wish to muzzle load then you can purchase a drop in cylinder to shoot cartridge bp.

take a look at the following links.

http://www.uberti.com/firearms/walker.tpl

http://www.randdgunshop.com/catalog.php?page=3&category=Drop%20In%20Cylinders

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 7:03 PM
NOPE

first you have define bp and cartridge. like i mentioned earlier bp muzzle loading rifles, shotguns, handguns require no dros or ffl. Some bp handguns can be made to shoot regular cartridges. Most recomend either very light smoke less loads. Or the original way which is bpcr. Black powder cartridge rifle or handgun. So the question after that is up to you. did you want to pay $1595 from dixie guns for that 1873 replica. Did you want to shoot bp or just single action. if your looking for single action you may want a new style gun. if your looking to shoot bp. Your better off getting an older style gun. if you do not wish to muzzle load then you can purchase a drop in cylinder to shoot cartridge bp.

take a look at the following links.

http://www.uberti.com/firearms/walker.tpl

http://www.randdgunshop.com/catalog.php?page=3&category=Drop%20In%20Cylinders

It's hard to understand exactly what you're saying with all those abbreviations and missing punctuation.

I have a Remington 1858 replica with a conversion cylinder. There's no question about an FFL for either.

But the question still remains, does a blackpowder cartridge revolver need an FFL, ignoring possible C&R? No one has yet given any reason why not, and I am certain I have seen other antiques on dixiegunworks which they say require modern hand gun rules.

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 7:06 PM
http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_23_26&products_id=71

$10,500, so it had darned well better be a real antique! And it says nothing about 1981 or any other date.

But it does say modern handgun rules apply.

scrat
02-06-2008, 7:10 PM
YES

if you purchase a black powder ((BP) not that hard) cartridge handgun you have to have a dros (dealer record of sale) through a licensed FFL (federal firearm license.

If you purchase a bp muzzle loading revolver you do not need to do the same. However where the loop is this. You can purchase a drop in cylinder. This drop in cylinder will allow you to fire center fire cartridges from a standard muzzle loading revolver. When you have this cylinder in place it is treated just like a modern centerfire revolver. Once you put the standard cylinder back in place its a standard black powder revolver.


Im not too sure how much more clear i can be.

Scarecrow Repair
02-06-2008, 9:24 PM
YES

if you purchase a black powder ((BP) not that hard) cartridge handgun you have to have a dros (dealer record of sale) through a licensed FFL (federal firearm license.

That's what I said in my post. So who are you arguing with?

EOD Guy
02-07-2008, 6:52 AM
YES

if you purchase a black powder ((BP) not that hard) cartridge handgun you have to have a dros (dealer record of sale) through a licensed FFL (federal firearm license.

If you purchase a bp muzzle loading revolver you do not need to do the same. However where the loop is this. You can purchase a drop in cylinder. This drop in cylinder will allow you to fire center fire cartridges from a standard muzzle loading revolver. When you have this cylinder in place it is treated just like a modern centerfire revolver. Once you put the standard cylinder back in place its a standard black powder revolver.


Im not too sure how much more clear i can be.
Not if the handgun is manufactured prior to 1899. DROS is only required for reproductions of antique firearms.