PDA

View Full Version : Question about voting...


Centurion_D
02-05-2008, 11:22 AM
If I register as independent or choose not to state political party how will this work for the elections in November? Will I have the choice to vote for any candidate for prez? I was under the impression if you register as a republican then you have to vote republican and the same goes for registering as a demo or your vote does not count. I'm thinking which ever political party you register as you have the right to vote for candidate you want regardless. Am I correct?:confused:

CitaDeL
02-05-2008, 11:27 AM
If I register as independent or choose not to state political party how will this work for the elections in November? Will I have the choice to vote for any candidate for prez? I was under the impression if you register as a republican then you have to vote republican and the same goes for registering as a demo or your vote does not count. I'm thinking which ever political party you register as you have the right to vote for candidate you want regardless. Am I correct?:confused:

In the General Election you will be able to cast your ballot for any candidate running.

DVSmith
02-05-2008, 11:28 AM
Your party affiliation is used in a primary election to determine which party ballot you will vote. In California, if you register as a decline to state, you may, depending on the party, have the option of voting in one or more party's primary. In this presidential primary, only the Dems and American Independent party elected to allow decline to state voters vote in their party primary. When you go to the polls, you can request a ballot for one of those parties or a non-partisan ballot (Measures only in this election in most places). In the November election, your party affiliation is not a factor. everyone votes the same ballot. It is the run-off election to select the candidates that the parties nominated in the primary. You can vote for any party's candidate on each race. For example, you could vote for a Democrat for President (we would have to revoke your membership here of course JK) and a Republican for the Assembly in your Assembly district. Does that make sense?

Centurion_D
02-05-2008, 11:31 AM
Cool..thanks for the clarification fellas. :)

Rhys898
02-05-2008, 11:54 AM
I thought people who decline to state or are "non declared" are able to vote in either but people that are registered "independant" can't vote in the republican primary....

Jer

DVSmith
02-05-2008, 12:09 PM
I thought people who decline to state or are "non declared" are able to vote in either but people that are registered "independant" can't vote in the republican primary....

Jer
Many people register as "American Independent" by accident thinking that they are not registering with a political party. "Independent" is not a qualified party and is not the same as "decline to state." If you select the "Other" box on the voter registration form and write in the word "Independent", I honestly can't tell you what the registrar will file you under. In theory, only "decline to state" voters are allowed to cross over to a party ballot.

DVSmith
02-05-2008, 12:14 PM
Here is the Elections Code section:

California Elections Code Section 13102

(a) All voting shall be by ballot. There shall be provided, at each polling place, at each election at which public officers are to be voted for, but one form of ballot for all candidates for public office, except that, for partisan primary elections, one form of ballot shall be provided for each qualified political party as well as one form of nonpartisan ballot, in accordance with subdivision (b).

(b) At partisan primary elections, each voter not registered as intending to affiliate with any one of the political parties participating in the election shall be furnished only a nonpartisan ballot, unless he or she requests a ballot of a political party and that political party, by party rule duly noticed to the Secretary of State, authorizes a person who has declined to state a party affiliation to vote the ballot of that political party. The nonpartisan ballot shall contain only the names of all candidates for nonpartisan offices and measures to be voted for at the primary election. Each voter registered as intending to affiliate with a political party participating in the election shall be furnished only a ballot of the political party with which he or she is registered and the nonpartisan ballot, both of which shall be printed together as one ballot in the form prescribed by Section 13207.

(c) A political party may adopt a party rule in accordance with subdivision (b) that authorizes a person who has declined to state a party affiliation to vote the ballot of that political party at the next ensuing partisan primary election. The political party shall notify the party chair immediately upon adoption of that party rule. The party chair shall provide written notice of the adoption of that rule to the Secretary of State not later than the 135th day prior to the partisan primary election at which the vote is authorized.

(d) The county elections official shall maintain a record of which political party's ballot was requested pursuant to subdivision (b), or whether a nonpartisan ballot was requested, by each person who declined to state a party affiliation. The record shall be made available to any person or committee who is authorized to receive copies of the printed indexes of registration for primary and general elections pursuant to Section 2184.

(e) This section shall become operative on March 6, 2002.

As you can see, there is some disconnect in the language "each voter not registered as intending to affiliate with any one of the political parties participating in the election". This is not EXACTLY the same thing as "decline to state". So in practice, any member of any party that does not participate in an election can cross over to any party that declares they will allow cross over voters for that election. I will have to do some checking to see how the Secretary of State has directed the counties to apply this section.

Ironchef
02-05-2008, 12:20 PM
So since I'm a "decline to specify" voter, I'm not able to vote today, right? I was under the impression that this is a closed primary..meaning to party members to vote for their party member.

Patriot
02-05-2008, 12:26 PM
So since I'm a "decline to specify" voter, I'm not able to vote today, right? I was under the impression that this is a closed primary..meaning to party members to vote for their party member.

You can vote Dem, so vote Hillary.

DVSmith
02-05-2008, 12:33 PM
So since I'm a "decline to specify" voter, I'm not able to vote today, right? I was under the impression that this is a closed primary..meaning to party members to vote for their party member.

Patriot is partially correct. You can vote a non-partisan ballot which will have the propositions or as Patriot points out, you could request a Democratic Party or an American Independent party (my prior post identifying the Green party was incorrect) ballot and vote in either of their primaries as well as vote the propositions. In any case... go vote!

PolishMike
02-05-2008, 12:42 PM
The national parties set the rules. Each state is different.
In California a "declined to state" voter CAN vote in the Democratic primary but NOT in the Republican one.

As far as the general election goes - you can vote for anyone on the ballot.