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Image Group
11-14-2013, 4:59 PM
Not sure where this should be asked but I am curious about any laws regarding shooting in the open waters off the CA coast. Are there any laws regarding firing from your personal boat off the coast of CA? I am not talking about shooting marine life I am asking about shooting maybe floating targets of some sort. Thanks for any info. I can't seem to find anything on the web.

chainsaw
11-14-2013, 5:04 PM
Before he dropped out of the matrix, Gene Hoffman (gun owner, and owner of a largish boat) used to discuss this here. The only part I remember is that there is some trickiness that depends on whether the vessel is registered federally or in the state. Try searching his old posts.

speedrrracer
11-14-2013, 5:42 PM
IIRC it's 12 or more nautical miles off the coast and you are GTG, as long as you're not in any shipping lanes, not endangering any other vessels, etc, etc, etc.

RickD427
11-14-2013, 6:15 PM
IIRC it's 12 or more nautical miles off the coast and you are GTG, as long as you're not in any shipping lanes, not endangering any other vessels, etc, etc, etc.

You're subject to California law up to 12 miles. One provision of California law to consider is Penal Code section 246.3 (Reckless Discharge of a Firearm). This section has been applied very liberally by some LEOs. You could find yourself charged if your gunfire had the possibility of striking any person.

There are no corresponding federal provisions applicable on the high seas.

You should be aware that gunfire at one minute intervals is a recognized distress signal (USCG Navigation Rules (Rule 37) and the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea). If your gunfire is taken as a distress signal, you may find yourself charged under 14 USC 85. It carries a felony penalty. You can help prevent this by making a VHF radio "securite" broadcast prior to firing.

There really isn't any difference, on this subject, between a state registered boat and a documented vessel. I own one of each and was a boarding officer during my Coast Guard service.

Masterdebater
11-14-2013, 9:38 PM
ive wondered the same... and figured the 12 mile rule would keep you safe. like rck said, maybe broadcast it over radio before doing so

M1NM
11-14-2013, 9:56 PM
Do cruise ships still offer skeet shooting?

ChrisC
11-15-2013, 7:31 AM
Do cruise ships still offer skeet shooting?

Yep, once they are in waters where it is legal to do it.

Rumline
11-15-2013, 10:06 AM
Which ones still offer it?

Lulfas
11-15-2013, 10:56 AM
Which ones still offer it?

None of the major cruiselines offer it.

USM0083
11-15-2013, 4:55 PM
None of the major cruiselines offer it.

Can't have lethal weapons on board, can we? :chris:

Lulfas
11-15-2013, 7:49 PM
Can't have lethal weapons on board, can we? :chris:

Actually, the issue was the debris being left in the ocean.

asm_
11-19-2013, 1:37 AM
Actually, the issue was the debris being left in the ocean.

you have gotta be kidding me. It's dry up clay for God sake!!! The ocean floor is covered with it.

hardlyworking
11-19-2013, 1:05 PM
You're subject to California law up to 12 miles. One provision of California law to consider is Penal Code section 246.3 (Reckless Discharge of a Firearm). This section has been applied very liberally by some LEOs. You could find yourself charged if your gunfire had the possibility of striking any person.

There are no corresponding federal provisions applicable on the high seas.

You should be aware that gunfire at one minute intervals is a recognized distress signal (USCG Navigation Rules (Rule 37) and the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea). If your gunfire is taken as a distress signal, you may find yourself charged under 14 USC 85. It carries a felony penalty. You can help prevent this by making a VHF radio "securite" broadcast prior to firing.

There really isn't any difference, on this subject, between a state registered boat and a documented vessel. I own one of each and was a boarding officer during my Coast Guard service.

Lol RickD I was going to ask how the *F* you knew all that until you brought out the Coast Guard

Lulfas
11-19-2013, 2:49 PM
you have gotta be kidding me. It's dry up clay for God sake!!! The ocean floor is covered with it.

The lead was the bigger issue. There was also a fair amount of complaints over the sound. In the end, there was just too few people who were willing to pay the extra to justify it.

GoldenSG
11-20-2013, 7:23 AM
The lead was the bigger issue. There was also a fair amount of complaints over the sound. In the end, there was just too few people who were willing to pay the extra to justify it.

A range I live near has skeet shooting next to the SF Bay. The broken clays fall into the Bay. They just don't allow lead shot.

stonefly-2
11-20-2013, 9:17 AM
as far as i know hunting sea ducks from a boat is legal. if not please explain , it's on my bucket list.

asm_
11-20-2013, 1:55 PM
The lead was the bigger issue. There was also a fair amount of complaints over the sound. In the end, there was just too few people who were willing to pay the extra to justify it.

That's even crazier than the clay theory. Fisherman use pounds of lead when fishing for rock fish. It is not uncommon for the weight and hook to get stuck on the ocean floor. That's more lead people will ever shot out their 12g.

.

CAL.BAR
11-20-2013, 2:35 PM
That's even crazier than the clay theory. Fisherman use pounds of lead when fishing for rock fish. It is not uncommon for the weight and hook to get stuck on the ocean floor. That's more lead people will ever shot out their 12g.

.

Huh? Have you ever held a few hundred shotgun shells? That must weigh 15 pounds or more. Now multiply that by every shooter and every session. While it is true that fishermen use pounds of weight, not ALL of it stays in the ocean whereas most all of the weight and ALL of the lead in the shotgun shell stays in the ocean every time. IDK if it matters, but..... if you ever go to a well-used shooting spot when no one cleans it up, the ground can be covered with hulls and debris. Hate to see the ocean floor end up like that.

meaty-btz
11-20-2013, 3:29 PM
OMG 15 # of lead! The Huge Manatee!

To bad about that lead in the environment.. naturally. Oh those California Condor Fish will be eating up all that lead from shooting off of ships!

JDay
11-21-2013, 8:33 AM
Actually, the issue was the debris being left in the ocean.

You can dump metal overboard legally. And the clays are made to dissolve.

Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk

RipVanWinkle
11-21-2013, 8:58 AM
http://www.dbw.ca.gov/Pubs/Pollute/dump.jpg

Required display placard for all boats 26 ft. and over. Plastic wads?, metal shot?, clay birds? (crockery?)??? Ground to less than one inch? :confused:

2761377
11-22-2013, 3:48 PM
...You should be aware that gunfire at one minute intervals is a recognized distress signal (USCG Navigation Rules (Rule 37) and the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea). If your gunfire is taken as a distress signal, you may find yourself charged under 14 USC 85. It carries a felony penalty. You can help prevent this by making a VHF radio "securite" broadcast prior to firing.

There really isn't any difference, on this subject, between a state registered boat and a documented vessel. I own one of each and was a boarding officer during my Coast Guard service.


This post and your experience in the CG got me thinking.

Let's assume a typical private fishing vessel with a tuna tower/flying bridge would allow a shooter enough height to make the horizon (by rough calculation) about 7-8 kilometers away. Shooting would commence only with the ocean clear of other vessels to this horizon, and, of course, out of regular shipping lanes.

question A) is this enough distance that gunfire would not be heard over the horizon? a motor vessel under way over the horizon would also be impeded by self-generated noise.

question B) can it be exected that gunfire of less (maybe way less) than the emergency signal interval of one shot per minute be ignored by those who know/understand rule 37?

it just seems that a radio message, in the clear (assuming channel 16) informing of a shooting session would be an invitation to be hassled.

thanks

speedrrracer
11-22-2013, 5:59 PM
Let's assume a typical private fishing vessel with a tuna tower/flying bridge would allow a shooter enough height to make the horizon (by rough calculation) about 7-8 kilometers away. Shooting would commence only with the ocean clear of other vessels to this horizon, and, of course, out of regular shipping lanes.

question A) is this enough distance that gunfire would not be heard over the horizon? a motor vessel under way over the horizon would also be impeded by self-generated noise.


No way to say with certainty. Even a small bit of chop and sound doesn't carry over water for squat. Conversely, if it's oiled glass, it carries better than normal. Wind noise and direction are also factors.

Spyguy
11-22-2013, 6:13 PM
if you ever go to a well-used shooting spot when no one cleans it up, the ground can be covered with hulls and debris. Hate to see the ocean floor end up like that.
You do realize that the ocean floor is a wee bit larger than any "well-used shooting spot," don't you?

ja308
11-23-2013, 5:45 PM
You do realize that the ocean floor is a wee bit larger than any "well-used shooting spot," don't you?


When I complained to the city about sidewalks in the uptown shopping area being in need of pressure washing . I was informed the city must block every drain and then vacuum up the water !

I really cannot see the rationale behind this. Like every time it rains the same stuff doesn't get vacuumed .
Years back I spent lots if time on Navy ships. It was amazing the ship would travel for days on end and the only thing visible was more water.

Am thinking its more of a mind control program than an environmental one.
The same can be said for restricting trap shoots from cruise ships, if that is the reason ?

Gemini Effect
12-09-2013, 2:29 PM
You should be aware that gunfire at one minute intervals is a recognized distress signal (USCG Navigation Rules (Rule 37) and the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea). If your gunfire is taken as a distress signal, you may find yourself charged under 14 USC 85. It carries a felony penalty. You can help prevent this by making a VHF radio "securite" broadcast prior to firing.



Fascinating.

blazeaglory
12-09-2013, 7:45 PM
IIRC it's 12 or more nautical miles off the coast and you are GTG, as long as you're not in any shipping lanes, not endangering any other vessels, etc, etc, etc.

^^^

Sure as hell beats firing out of the sunroof on PCH;)

hoffmang
12-09-2013, 8:05 PM
I need to do some more research on the 3 miles v 12 miles issues as it's not clear CA has jurisdiction between 3 and 12 for non F&G (or gambling) laws but the old gaming boats off LA cases are probably dispositive.

As a matter of course, the only LEA you'll see 3+ miles off are USCG who don't care (as long as you correctly inform that it's not a false distress signal) and CA Fish and Game. On the latter, if you don't have fishing gear, it's not clear to me they can bother you much when you're federally documented. They potentially can bother you if you are CF numbered.

-Gene

asm_
12-10-2013, 11:57 AM
They potentially can bother you if you are CF numbered

Actually, being a fisherman my self, I don't recall ever get boarded by DFG. They usually wait for the boat to return to shore.

.