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View Full Version : do you use shooting rest to get bettet MOA?


ohlone
10-16-2013, 4:36 PM
just into bolt gun shooting and saw many people use shooting rests in the range, do i need to use one?

Gutz
10-16-2013, 4:37 PM
It's a plus to see what the rifle is really capable of doing.

I don't use one all the time, only when measuring the rifle's accuracy.

rm1911
10-16-2013, 4:58 PM
It's like hitting off a tee, which all major leaguers do a lot. And my boys spend majority of their swinging time on. It perfects your swing and points out any flaws. Any shooting errors will get magnified once away from the rest. Perfect your trigger squeeze, sight picture, etc on the rest. Then move onto more realistic positions.

Also load development when working up the most accurate loads. Sometimes it's just relaxing to shoot that way. And another thing is that most ranges have tables and it's kinda hard to move them so you end up shooting on the tables or benches and need to make it comfortable.

ohlone
10-16-2013, 5:30 PM
Which low priced rest do you guys recommend for a rookie? I have a $30 rest from big5 when it was on sale and i use as a cleaning station so far, will that one be ok for now?

ExtremeX
10-16-2013, 6:17 PM
Are you talking about a bigger larger rests that accommodate the whole rifle or something simple like a set of bags or just a rear bag?

I don’t use a big adjustable rest, but I do use a rear bag for accuracy testing and load development…

NoHeavyHitter
10-16-2013, 6:19 PM
I use a rest (and chronograph) when I'm doing load development. I really don't care if that makes people think that I can't shoot worth a crap. That's their problem.

smittty
10-16-2013, 6:39 PM
A test is a must for accuracy. I use a bipod on the front and a sandbag under the butt. If you don't already have a bipod make sure the one you get allows you to turn or pivot horizontally as well as vertically. Blackhawk makes one like this for about $50. Well worth it IMO!

desert dog
10-16-2013, 7:30 PM
I use a rest off a bench when I chrono rounds.

For actual shooting, I go prone with a bipod and a bean-bag. Getting your natural point of aim on a rifle is a perishable skill, so I try to use it as much as possible.

NorCalFocus
10-16-2013, 9:02 PM
Bi-pod and rear bag for me.

I have a couple of full gun rest, that I use to train my kids with.

ohlone
10-16-2013, 10:12 PM
thanks, i got it :)

Black Majik
10-16-2013, 10:29 PM
If I'm shooting for groups on the bench, I use an adjustable front rest and rear bags.

Ziggy91
10-16-2013, 11:06 PM
Shooting bags are very popular. Unfortunately, it has become a necessity for every new rifle owner to buy bags and rests before they hit the range. I also see way too much of those caldwell or w/e shooting vises that holds the rifle so tightly, the owner only has to pull the trigger. These things have removed all trace of skill from the shooter. Granted, I do understand the guys "testing their new loads"... but, for the others, what are you really trying to accomplish at 50 yards with a 16" AR and open sights? Crawl before you walk.

My first time shooting a rifle was proned out on grass, resting my arm between the ground and buddy's bolt action rifle, shooting at a fence 100 yards away. That was fun, but I didn't have a clue about accuracy back then.

Bastard
10-16-2013, 11:15 PM
I use a Caldwell rock (http://www.amazon.com/Caldwell-Rock-Deluxe-Front-Rifle/dp/B001AT4Q9Q/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1381990264&sr=8-6&keywords=caldwell+shooting+rest) when shooting off a bench @ the range.
I use it because it give me a much more stable platform than the leaning tower of sandbags that are avaliable at the local range. I have bipods as well that I use, but it really all depends on the rifle.
I have a few rifles that I refuse to use a bipod on so I default back to the shooting rest.

as far as a rear bag goes I use a Caldwell rear bag (http://www.amazon.com/Caldwell-Deluxe-Universal-Rear-Bag/dp/B000G79ADU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381990479&sr=8-2&keywords=caldwell+rear+bag) or just a sandbag if I happen to forget the rear bag.

wjc
10-17-2013, 12:00 AM
I shoot off the sandbags. I think it gets me a more "real world" setup.

When I hunt I use a shooting stick so I can make sure I make a steady shot.

Divernhunter
10-17-2013, 1:37 PM
I have a lead sled and a machine rest but usually just use bean bags. They are sand bags designed for shooting but filled with dry beans. They do not leak out like when filled with sand. They are also lighter and easier to carry/move.

Arnelcheeze
10-17-2013, 3:22 PM
easier to shoot off a bag, with a bipod you have to know how to load it to use them properly. I use them both, the bag if im lazy.

Vu 308
10-17-2013, 3:30 PM
I've used all of the above.

Rest, bi pod, bags, and rear bag or some sort.

Personally, I shoot my tightest groups prone, bi-pod, and rear bag, or I shoot off a back pack of some sort that will support a large portion of the rifle.

Those things you strap your rifle in are junk IMO because they do not have the adjustability to maintain the same point of aim. They are just good for the guys that want to shoot heavy magnums in 7lb rifles.

YMMV

Raralith
10-17-2013, 5:54 PM
I normally shoot off of a bipod and nothing in the rear, or bags front and rear if I am testing loads. I'm shooting at a bench, not hunting or in a warzone. I want to shoot 300+ yard targets comfortably.

Khromo
10-17-2013, 6:23 PM
Which low priced rest do you guys recommend for a rookie? I have a $30 rest from big5 when it was on sale and i use as a cleaning station so far, will that one be ok for now?

The Caldwell Rock Jr. is priced right ($25 or so) and is a very functional front rest. It comes with a front sand bag. Midway has them on sale pretty regularly, and they often sell them with a filled rear bag that can produce very respectable results for about $40.

Read up on the best techniques, and you'll produce the smallest groups you've ever shot. Get your sight alignment, trigger control, and breathing tuned up, and you can move on to a bipod in place of the front rest, and get into some more advanced shooting in no time.

LynnJr
10-18-2013, 12:41 AM
All of the most accurate rifles use a front rest from 22 long rifle to 50 BMG and everything in between.
If your on a budget you can make a very decent front rest out of wood and let your rear bag be your windage and elevation.

50BMGBOB
10-18-2013, 4:59 AM
I also see way too much of those caldwell or w/e shooting vises that holds the rifle so tightly, the owner only has to pull the trigger. These things have removed all trace of skill from the shooter.

The other day I was at the range and another shooter was upset at not being able to group with his new rifle. He shot his other rifles fine but had bought a lead sled for his new rifle and was on his third trip with different loads/ammo. After talking a little he asked what I thought and I pointed out that he wasn't even set up on the lead sled right, the sand bags where loose and it was a vary unstable set up (not the lead sled but how he was using it). He had thought that just buying a rest would take the shooter out of the equation. What he failed to realize in that there is a technique to learn when shooting of a rest. I helped him tighten things and explained the technique a little which helped him a lot and he started shooting much better. Then loaned him a bipod like he was planning to use eventually with his rifle and was use to. His groups where much better still.

I've used all of the above.

Rest, bi pod, bags, and rear bag or some sort.

Personally, I shoot my tightest groups prone, bi-pod, and rear bag, or I shoot off a back pack of some sort that will support a large portion of the rifle.


I to do my best shooting off the ground with a bipod. I have shoot off rest that cost a lot and even own them but I don't really see an advantage when I can shoot <1/2moa without them.

Switchbarrel
10-18-2013, 5:10 PM
The other day I was at the range and another shooter was upset at not being able to group with his new rifle. What he failed to realize in that there is a technique to learn when shooting of a rest.


Do you "need" to use one, No. However, if you do choose to...


One of my local ranges has wooden top benches. You probably wouldn't notice it with a low powered scope but, with my scope set at 42x, I can literally watch my reticle move ~3/4" from side to side on the target if I lean on the bench. So, the technique has to be the same every shot (now I don't lean on the benches there) to get the best groups.

-Rick

CSACANNONEER
10-18-2013, 5:19 PM
Shooting bags are very popular. Unfortunately, it has become a necessity for every new rifle owner to buy bags and rests before they hit the range. I also see way too much of those caldwell or w/e shooting vises that holds the rifle so tightly, the owner only has to pull the trigger. These things have removed all trace of skill from the shooter. Granted, I do understand the guys "testing their new loads"... but, for the others, what are you really trying to accomplish at 50 yards with a 16" AR and open sights? Crawl before you walk.

My first time shooting a rifle was proned out on grass, resting my arm between the ground and buddy's bolt action rifle, shooting at a fence 100 yards away. That was fun, but I didn't have a clue about accuracy back then.

Your ignorance is amazing. It's taken me years to learn how to shoot of a front and rear rest. Even after years of learning, I still shoot an occasional +20" group at 1000 yards and even bigger if the conditions really suck. I've proved my loads can shoot sub 2" groups at 1000 yards (the first four shots at my last record group at my last match proved that but, I rushed and threw the last shot to open it up to a +4" group) but, I've never been able to shoot anywhere near that well.

I do understand where you are coming from though. I shot metallic silhouette for several years and have some turkey pins around here somewhere. So, I can shoot off hand reasonably well. But, precision benchrest takes a lot more skill than you think it does.

frankm
10-18-2013, 5:21 PM
I only use them or bipods to sight in. After it doesn't matter, shoot with, shoot without.

Dontlook72
10-21-2013, 10:58 AM
Front sand bag just to site in to 100 yards. After that, it's all on me if I hit or miss. I just want to make sure my gun is sited in properly, my hands aren't as steady as they used to be.

Lucky Scott
10-21-2013, 7:25 PM
I like a front rest........

sffred
10-26-2013, 4:29 AM
For me, some reason I get better groups shooting off bags in the front and a single squeeze bag in the rear than bipod in the front squeeze bag in the rear, but that's me.

LCU1670
10-26-2013, 4:56 AM
That's because of the principal of : hard on soft. A bipod is : hard on hard, making it bouncy on recoil. When shooting off a bipod you have to lean into the legs and : load the bipod.

Ohlone, you don't have to buy anything, for your front rest, use a backpack or book bag, you can put some rolled up towels in it for proper height, for the rear, an old sock with some dry rice in it as a squeeze bag. Check your cheek weld, you may need some sort of padding on the stock, some people buy them, some make them out of a towel and tape, then find your natural point of aim.

CK_32
10-26-2013, 5:17 AM
I do. Not saying it makes or breaks me but I like to think it helps.

I just use my back pack and throw a hoodie in the big pouch for support.

webcruzzer
10-26-2013, 11:26 AM
I am using a buddys lead sled. But I get tigher groups when I go prone.