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dwtt
10-03-2013, 8:47 PM
I have a question for those of you who cut tatami mats. How do you go about sharpening the blade when it gets dull? Do you bring it to a sharpening service or do you sharpen it at home with a stone?
thanks.

Blademan21
10-03-2013, 10:42 PM
There is a shop in Loma Linda that does just that. Its across from the Spreen Honda dealership.The last time I was in the area it was there anyways. I can't recall the name but if its still open the shop owner is a real nice guy. He does it on a large stone that sits on a floor type map. He also sells swords and their parts.
If your sword is a nice one don't Bubba it up and try to sharpen it on a stone. Unless you really know how to use one. I have buffed swords on a buffing wheel and that is not an easy thing to do. Good luck.

Dark Mod
10-04-2013, 8:44 AM
its gonna get REAL expensive if you have to pay for someone to sharpen your sword everytime. Especially if you actually use it.

I have a few swords, none of which are particularly expensive, but they are all sharp, and i keep them that way.

Heres what i would do:

Learn how to hone your own edges, practice on cheap knives until your good enough to do it consistantly. This took me the better part of a year.

What kind of sword do you intend to sharpen? It sounds like a japanese sword like a katana. If thats the case, make sure you identify the grind before you even touch it.

A katana that was sharpened by stones will have a flat grind, one that was sharpened by a rotary stone will have a hollow grind, and one that was sharpened by a belt sander will have a convex grind.

If your katana has a flat grind, get a set of stones and learn how to use them. This is how the japanese sharpened their swords, and it will get them razor sharp.

If its a convex grind, just get one of those powered beltsanders they sell as sharpeners and your good.

A hollow grind is a different pony, and this is where you may want to start thinking about having it professionally sharpened, or changing the grind profile to a flat grind. You could always buy a wheel i guess, but theres a bunch of other problems involved in that.

All my swords have a flat grind, i did have to reprofile my saber because it came with a convex grind.

amd64
10-04-2013, 6:19 PM
I use waterstones (1000, 4000) for touchup and just maintain a shallow 2ndary bevel. This keeps the blades plenty sharp for at least a couple sessions and leaves the blade "niku" and geometry intact.

I don't trust myself to mess with the blade geometry, that's for those with experience or the pro polishers.

Bongos
10-06-2013, 2:29 PM
At $70-$100 an inch.. it gets expensive to sharpen one sword

Blademan21
10-09-2013, 9:39 PM
There is a shop in Loma Linda that does just that. Its across from the Spreen Honda dealership.The last time I was in the area it was there anyways. I can't recall the name but if its still open the shop owner is a real nice guy. He does it on a large stone that sits on a floor type map. He also sells swords and their parts.
If your sword is a nice one don't Bubba it up and try to sharpen it on a stone. Unless you really know how to use one. I have buffed swords on a buffing wheel and that is not an easy thing to do. Good luck.



Found the shop's business card

Masamune Sword Shop
Japanese Swords
Mike Christianson
Proprietor/Sword Polisher
Member:
Japanese Sword Society U.S.
Nippon Bjustsu Token Hozon Kai
Nanka Token Kai
Flordia Token Kai
New York Japanese Sword Club
Northern California Sword Club
909-799-2088
email:masamune@worldnet.att.net

I called the number and I understand if a message is left Mr. Christianson returns calls in a timely manner. Heis full of information. Speaks,reads and writes Japanese as well. Great guy to talk to. Good luck.

PS--its called polishing not sharpening by the inch :facepalm: