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FEDUPWBS
01-03-2008, 3:43 PM
Idea. What rules would you put in place to purchase and share/use a big dillon 1050 or like reloading machine. Say 12 people split the cost and use the machine on a signup basis up to 1 mo reserved or meet on a weekend and crank out ammo? Could also do group buys in serious bulk components. Dillon equipment is lifetime so wear and tear doesnt factor in. Your input is welcome. Thanks, Fedup

anyracoon
01-03-2008, 4:24 PM
FEDUPBS

The last I heard Dillon does not offer lifetime warranty on the 1050 press.

I tell my Wife, "If you haven't grown up by the time you reach 60, you don't have to!"

FEDUPWBS
01-03-2008, 4:42 PM
FEDUPBS

The last I heard Dillon does not offer lifetime warranty on the 1050 press.

I tell my Wife, "If you haven't grown up by the time you reach 60, you don't have to!"

I think I meant Carbide dies etc? I dont know muchabout the subject.

ar15barrels
01-03-2008, 6:01 PM
Dillon 1050 is considered a "commercial" machine and therefore only carries a 1yr warranty.

I would not choose a 1050 for a machine that would be used for multiple cartridges.
It's a serious pain to re-configure.

The 650 would be my choice if I were to have only ONE Dillon press.

I have 8 Dillon presses though so I get to pick and choose the best tool for each job.

Each of my two 1050's is dedicated to a cartridge (9mm and 223) and I almost never change the setup beyond powder charge or bullet weight.

The 650 is seriously easy to re-configure from one cartridge to the next.
5 minutes if you know what you are doing.
Get multiple toolheads.
Leave each completely setup.

anyracoon
01-03-2008, 6:04 PM
I don't know about the dies but I had to pay for replacement decapping pins for my Dillon 223 carbide dies. I bought a dozen so as not to be up the creek on a large run.

I tell my Wife, "If you haven't grown up by the time you reach 60, you don't have to!"

ar15barrels
01-03-2008, 6:06 PM
12 people, figure $200 to $250 a person buy-in.
This will let you buy tooling for about 6 cartridges as well as incedentals like 3 tumblers, a gracey trimmer, scale, a bunch of loading manuals etc...

Then have the co-op members go together on primer/powder/bullet group buys.

You need some kind of waiver/agreement.
Everyone agrees to only load their own ammo.
Everyone agrees to only load ammo for their personal use.
Everyone agrees to hold everyone else harmless etc...

Don't store primers/powder at the "clubhouse".
Everyone brings their own components to the clubhouse and takes them away when they are done.

FEDUPWBS
01-04-2008, 6:46 AM
Great Ideas Randall thanks.

11Z50
01-04-2008, 7:05 AM
I used to do alot of reloading, and had a semi-coop going on. From time to time, a few of my buddies would get together and we'd load a bunch of ammo using a team approach. I owned all the gear, a 650, dies, etc. We'd do a mass order of components, and spend the weekend loading ammo.

One guy would do case prep, another would load primer tubes and keep the bullets straight, we'd switch operators, and another guy would tend the BBQ and ice chest.

It worked out great, we loaded thousands of rounds and had a good time.

I think a coop is a good idea, but group ownership of the gear might eventually cause heartburn. A 650 is plenty of machine for a group to use and is covered by the lifetime warranty. My .02 is for one person to own the press and others buy dies, toolheads, components, and other stuff. That way, should someone have to move or whatever the group can continue with minimal hassle. It's also more efficient to get a few guys together that shoot a common caliber/load and mass produce.

pbrand
01-04-2008, 7:15 AM
FEDUP you can count me in for a coop reloading.

FEDUPWBS
01-04-2008, 7:38 AM
As far as group ownership goes why not have "shares" start with the original 10-12 people. If one wants to leave the group he can just walk away and his interest will be absorbed by the other share holders. If you lose a member a spot will be opened up for a new member to buy in with some fresh equipment. There would never be more than the original # of members at any time.

I used to do alot of reloading, and had a semi-coop going on. From time to time, a few of my buddies would get together and we'd load a bunch of ammo using a team approach. I owned all the gear, a 650, dies, etc. We'd do a mass order of components, and spend the weekend loading ammo.

One guy would do case prep, another would load primer tubes and keep the bullets straight, we'd switch operators, and another guy would tend the BBQ and ice chest.

It worked out great, we loaded thousands of rounds and had a good time.

I think a coop is a good idea, but group ownership of the gear might eventually cause heartburn. A 650 is plenty of machine for a group to use and is covered by the lifetime warranty. My .02 is for one person to own the press and others buy dies, toolheads, components, and other stuff. That way, should someone have to move or whatever the group can continue with minimal hassle. It's also more efficient to get a few guys together that shoot a common caliber/load and mass produce.

AJAX22
01-04-2008, 7:46 AM
I'm going to respectfully dissagree with the coop team approach reloading being a good idea.

yes it can work, but if you've ever seen someone with a rifle bolt sticking out of their jaw from a doublecharged round it will sour you on the idea real quick.

IMHO all reloading should be done by the guy who will be pulling the trigger himself, with no alcohol or distractions involved, and a healthy appriciation of the very real danger that a misloaded round can represent.

i dont want to discourage you, a group buy/communal ownership of the equipment could definitly work, but just be carefull with this stuff.

11Z50
01-04-2008, 8:26 AM
As far as group ownership goes why not have "shares" start with the original 10-12 people. If one wants to leave the group he can just walk away and his interest will be absorbed by the other share holders. If you lose a member a spot will be opened up for a new member to buy in with some fresh equipment. There would never be more than the original # of members at any time.

That would probably work OK, just be careful a make sure everybody agrees up front. I live near you, shoot me a PM when you have time. I talked with Rex yesterday.

sergeantrex
01-04-2008, 10:39 AM
Can I reload my .22's? "Just kidding"

I think this is s great idea I always benefit from stuff like this, as long as personalitys don't get in the way and there are a decent group of people involved. There seems to be a pretty tight group of Fresno area Calgunners, this might work.

FEDUPWBS
01-04-2008, 11:14 AM
AJAX your 100% correct the man pulling the handle owns the ammo! But as far as say case trimming, etc can be done with the team approach.
Considering 1K of milsurp .308 is a "great deal" at $400 it wont take long to recoup your $ and wont have 2K$ invested in a machine and peripherals sitting in the garage thats not getting used most of the time.
11z50 small world aint it;).

FEDUPWBS
01-07-2008, 1:46 PM
bump any more ideas?

JeffM
01-07-2008, 3:00 PM
I like the idea of "dues". It could be a regular timed thing, like monthly or quarterly. That way the $$$ can be dropped into an account and the "to-buy" list of components can be worked down as the funds are available.

I just know that in deciding to make a major purchase, voting on it can be a pain depending on the timing. Someone may not have $200 at the time to throw down on a new 650. What happens when you have 90% of the members ready to go, but one or two hold outs? But if people sign up to drop ~$25-50 per month, then major purchases can be made at regular intervals.

But then you have the issue of who's holding the $$, etc.

Who wants to be treasurer? I call "not-it".

fast318
01-07-2008, 6:57 PM
I'll be the treasurer, but all events must take place in San Diego :-)

btw i'm at Disneyland right now staking out a spot for the firework show.

JeffM
01-11-2008, 12:09 AM
Bump. I'd like to hear more ideas too.

Anyone belong to a coop type club or organization that cares to shed some light on pros/cons/pitfalls?