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unbind
08-17-2013, 12:36 AM
Well this post may be premature as I have yet to buy my first gun but i just wanted to familiarize myself with some rifles for the future. I mostly shoot handguns and pistols and have only shot one rifle platform which would be the AR. Something I've always wanted to get into was long distance shooting and I've found the perfect range in SoCal called the Oak Tree Gun Club. If I were to buy a rifle I would prefer it to be a caliber bigger than the .308, like maybe the .338 Lapua Magnum.

I am not at all familiar with rifles and would love some input. My friend in the military was telling me to go to Gunbroker and buy my own parts but that seemed too far-fetched as I do not have an extensive knowledge of rifles. He tried giving me a quick tutorial on how to build an AR (assembling the lower/upper) but I wasn't paying much attention at the time. Anyways I'm looking to expand my horizons and was wondering what rifles you guys can recommend.

I guess my price range would be about $1000-$3000 but that would be after I purchase my new pistol first (which could take some time scrounging up the money after that).

-Thanks in advance

AeroEngi
08-17-2013, 1:04 AM
So are you looking for an AR type rifle or a bolt action rifle? If I were you, I'd stay away from the 338 Lapua Magnum, it's way too expensive. If you're going for a bolt action, stick with the .308. Start looking into the Remington 700. I have a Remington 700p and it's dead nuts accurate out of the box.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

unbind
08-17-2013, 1:23 AM
Sorry I didnt clarify, I was looking for a possible AR sniper platform, but I also might be interested in a bolt-action. I heard some great things about the Remington 700 and would like to do some more research on it. Bass Pro Shops sells a .30-06 Remington 700 SPS for about $600, should I just go for that one and build it up as I become a better long distance shooter or buy something a bit more expensive. Thanks for the advice.

ar15barrels
08-17-2013, 1:34 AM
Sorry I didnt clarify, I was looking for a possible AR sniper platform.

Average Calguns users are going to tell you that you can make a precision rifle out of an AR.

If you truly want a precision rifle, a bolt action is the way to go.
If you want to learn about precision rifles from local precision rifle shooters, go check out the forums on CAPRC.com.

-hanko
08-17-2013, 4:37 AM
Sorry I didnt clarify, I was looking for a possible AR sniper platform, but I also might be interested in a bolt-action. I heard some great things about the Remington 700 and would like to do some more research on it. Bass Pro Shops sells a .30-06 Remington 700 SPS for about $600, should I just go for that one and build it up as I become a better long distance shooter or buy something a bit more expensive. Thanks for the advice.
I'd spend more money and definitely look past the Remington and see what you can find. The Remington recommendations here are similar to those on the shotgun section on the Remington 870...i.e., it's a good starter rifle but why buy and "build it up" when you can get a turnkey weapon??

Waiting for inevitable herp/derp about the word "sniper"...many here wet their pants about it. :eek:


Average Calguns users are going to tell you that you can make a precision rifle out of an AR.

If you truly want a precision rifle, a bolt action is the way to go.
If you want to learn about precision rifles from local precision rifle shooters, go check out the forums on CAPRC.com.
/Thread.

This is not the place to learn about sniper rifles...see above.

-hanko

highpower
08-17-2013, 5:24 AM
Have you ever shot a .338 LM? I ask because you may want to try one before you buy. While it may be the best thing since sliced bread for very long distance shooting, they kick like a mule. The recoil is not helped by the fact that they are mostly shot off the bench and the recoil pulse goes straight back into your shoulder.

Added to the fact that was already alluded to that they are rather expensive, I would recommend that you look at a different caliber for your first long distance gun. I would say to maybe consider a rifle chambered in .308. They will have MUCH less recoil and it is cheaper to reload for than the larger calibers. And don't kid yourself, you will have to reload if you expect to wring the performance you will need to shoot a great distances.

Since you are new to rifles, you have a rather large learning curve to overcome and I think it is foolish to start with a heavy caliber rifle before you have the background skills to properly utilize it. Kind of like giving a novice driver a high performance sports car before they learn the principals of operating a motor vehicle.

Personally, I feel that most people think that they can shoot long distances without realizing just how hard it really is. Beyond 600 yards factors like wind drift and humidity add up and it is extremely hard to hit your target consistently.

The only way to get better at distance shooting is lots and lots of practice and that takes a lot of money and time.

Guapoh
08-17-2013, 5:35 AM
NEMO arms builds the Omen. It is a factory AR sniper platform in 300 Win Mag.

Keep in mind that If you are simply trying to hit targets a long way away, bigger bullets don't necessarily mean longer range. One of the preferred cartridges for long range hunting is the 7MM Remington Magnum. That cartridge was the US Secret Service's preferred countersniper round for 20 years until they switched to 300wm to maintain commonality with other LE organizations.

Check out GunWerks.com. They might change your mind on caliber and preferred action for looooooong distance shooting.

JohnnyMtn
08-17-2013, 6:01 AM
Oaktree is a fine range but it is not the place for long-distance shooting. Their range is 100 yards at the absolute max. If you want long range then head over to Wes Thompson's Piru range where you can get out to 500+. They even have gongs out to 1000.

As for a rifle, as others have said, start small. You can't really just start shooting like a sniper so getting a snipered-out AR is a stretch. Get some bolt gun in probably .308. A Rem 700 is good. Maybe a Howa 1500. Heck, even a Ruger American would get you going. This way you can learn fundamentals and learn what you like so you can then drop bigger money in an intelligent way.

choprzrul
08-17-2013, 6:27 AM
Buy a Marlin 795, 8 spare mags , and enroll in an Appleseed course. Hone your skills out to 100yds for a couple of years and then find an M1A.

After shooting a bunch of .308 out of a semi auto, then start thinking about a big belted magnum precision bolt action.

You need a solid foundation in the fundamentals and then you need to learn how to deal with recoil. It is really easy for you to learn a bunch of bad habits early on and they will be difficult to correct.

Good luck on your journey.

.

JohnnyMtn
08-17-2013, 6:51 AM
Absolutely 100% agree with the above post. For anyone wanting to get into rifle shooting, go to an Appleseed. Go to two Appleseeds. You will learn so much that you never even knew you needed to learn.

Everything that you learn on a .22 will apply directly to any other caliber you move up to. And you dont have to shoot .22 at an Appleseed because you can shoot any caliber you want. But considering you will shoot 350-450 rounds over both days, .22 makes that easier to accomplish. Or at least it used to before the shortages.

Highly recommend Appleseed!

brassburnz
08-17-2013, 7:12 AM
Buy or build a dedicated AR22 on a AR15 type receiver and lots of ammo. Even with the current demand, you should be able to find .22 rimfire ammo for close to 10 cents a round. 5.56 NATO or .223 Remington will run around 50 cents a round. For the same amount of money, you'll get 5 times the practice.

After you've learned the basics of rifle marksmanship, you can decide on a centerfire round you can use with the same lower receiver. There are several calibers and barrel lengths/profiles available. I can easily reach out to 600 yards with my 18 inch SPR in 5.56 NATO with a Nikon M-223 2-8X32 BDC scope. For distances past 600 yards, you might want to look at the 6.5 Grendel. There are quite a few specialty cartridges that will work with an AR15 lower.

You could even use a bolt-action upper on the AR15 lower, but I don't know how practical that would be. http://www.brownells.com/rifle-parts/receiver-action-parts/receivers/upper-receivers/ar-15-m16-tactilite-upper-receiver-t1-duty-416-barrett-29-bbl-sku100-005-532-40862-74888.aspx


Well this post may be premature as I have yet to buy my first gun but i just wanted to familiarize myself with some rifles for the future. I mostly shoot handguns and pistols and have only shot one rifle platform which would be the AR. Something I've always wanted to get into was long distance shooting and I've found the perfect range in SoCal called the Oak Tree Gun Club. If I were to buy a rifle I would prefer it to be a caliber bigger than the .308, like maybe the .338 Lapua Magnum.

I am not at all familiar with rifles and would love some input. My friend in the military was telling me to go to Gunbroker and buy my own parts but that seemed too far-fetched as I do not have an extensive knowledge of rifles. He tried giving me a quick tutorial on how to build an AR (assembling the lower/upper) but I wasn't paying much attention at the time. Anyways I'm looking to expand my horizons and was wondering what rifles you guys can recommend.

I guess my price range would be about $1000-$3000 but that would be after I purchase my new pistol first (which could take some time scrounging up the money after that).

-Thanks in advance

Hairball
08-17-2013, 7:14 AM
As you have described that you have no experience with rifles or shooting at distance, you need to learn to walk before you can run and this journey will take years to successful transition from one platform to another. As you have stated a max budget of 3K, that puts you at the lower end of builds to start your education.

For example, a Remington 700 Police in .308 with badger base and rings, Bushnell tactical elite HDMR scope and Harris bipod will set you back around 3K. This is what may be considered a standard entry build into long range shooting. As you have no experience at all, you may even need to go to a lower caliber (.270 maybe) as you learn the fundamentals of rifle shooting. If you do not have anyone to help you with basic fundamentals, take some entry level courses like Appleseed and progress from there.

It is common for new shooters to feel the need to have lager caliber rifles but you would do yourself a great disservice by starting out with a 300 win or larger and you may even give up the pursuit of long range shooting as you will not get the initial results you are hoping for. Over the years as you build up your skill level (and your bank account) you can progress into other platforms. Just remember, LR and ELR shooting comes at a price that many are not willing to spend. You mention a .338 Lapua but this round is more expensive to shoot than my .416 or .50 BMG Barrett’s.

Distance and precision equates to solid platforms and optics that are up to the task. Someone mentioned that a .338 Lap is heavy in the recoil but that all depends on the platform. I have an AIAX .338 Lap that has very little recoil that is topped with a S&B that allows for great visibility but all this equipment comes with a premium price tag.

If you are serious about LR shooting, you really need to think about becoming involved in reloading to not only have a more accurate round but you will save on the cost of ammo which allows you to shoot more often. Again, if LR and ELR is what you want, stay away from AR platforms because they don’t come close to bolt action rifles in the LR game. If you just want to bang steel with minute of man accuracy then you might be Ok but keeping tight groups for score in another story. Good luck and find a good mentor to help guide you through this process before you purchase stuff that will not work with what you intend to accomplish.

Divernhunter
08-17-2013, 8:29 AM
Your 1st firearm should be a 22rf and then practice. Then move up to 223 or 308win and practice.
As far a LR shooting you need to learn to crawl then walk before running a marathon. Get the idea?

russ69
08-17-2013, 8:42 AM
...yet to buy my first gun... long distance shooting...Oak Tree Gun Club...the .338 Lapua Magnum...

Son, you have a long way to go. Hang out here on CalGuns cruise around and get comfortable. Most of the info here is popular opinion but I will recommend you go to some matches and see whats going on. You'll want to go to a highpower match, a benchrest match and a tactical match. Watch and learn. See you in a few years.

OakTreeGunClub
08-17-2013, 9:03 AM
Well this post may be premature as I have yet to buy my first gun but i just wanted to familiarize myself with some rifles for the future. I mostly shoot handguns and pistols and have only shot one rifle platform which would be the AR. Something I've always wanted to get into was long distance shooting and I've found the perfect range in SoCal called the Oak Tree Gun Club. If I were to buy a rifle I would prefer it to be a caliber bigger than the .308, like maybe the .338 Lapua Magnum.

I am not at all familiar with rifles and would love some input. My friend in the military was telling me to go to Gunbroker and buy my own parts but that seemed too far-fetched as I do not have an extensive knowledge of rifles. He tried giving me a quick tutorial on how to build an AR (assembling the lower/upper) but I wasn't paying much attention at the time. Anyways I'm looking to expand my horizons and was wondering what rifles you guys can recommend.

I guess my price range would be about $1000-$3000 but that would be after I purchase my new pistol first (which could take some time scrounging up the money after that).

-Thanks in advance

For that price range, we can definitely get you set up with an awesome long-range setup. We have Remington 700s in .308 among many other options -even a Christiansen Arms .338 Lapua Carbon fiber.

If you come back to us, find Spencer or Buell in the gun shop, they will help you get information and price shop for quality gear. Let us know if we can help!

-OTGC

Metal God
08-17-2013, 9:32 AM
I think a nice starter gun would be this one :D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ft2j6J4NcY

unbind
08-17-2013, 9:47 AM
Thanks guys for the info, yeah I know the .338 LM is not meant for beginners. I'll definitely check out Appleseed, I guess its time to go to the range and test some of these guns.

The two guns I keep hearing about on this forum and in my social circles is the remington 700 and m1a, one bolt and one semi-auto. Which beginner's gun would you start out with? .308, .223, 300WN, .30-06?

I would also not be disinterested in an AR platform as you can do many things to modify it as you go. If I were to choose an AR what companies should i research on parts?

Thanks again

russ69
08-17-2013, 9:50 AM
...-even a Christiansen Arms .338 Lapua Carbon fiber...

Would you really sell a brand new shooter a lightweight 338? I'm glad to have you post about your fine store but I have my limits.

P.S. Can I come and watch him shoot his first shot? I'll have my money ready to buy that rifle cheap.

unbind
08-17-2013, 9:50 AM
I think a nice starter gun would be this one :D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ft2j6J4NcY

Ahahaha good one, I wish I had one of those but dont have 10-20k lying around.

hermosabeach
08-17-2013, 10:03 AM
Ignore the haters- buy what you want before they are not allowed in CA

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Some will say that while the .338 Lapua is awesome
Others will say-
$6.00 a shot- ouch
Recoil- ouch
Loud- ouch
Rapid fire will eat the throat in 400-600 rounds- ouch
Real optics- $2k and up- ouch

Have fun- buy any rifle you want


The .338 is an awesome round!!!!!

Sheepdog1968
08-17-2013, 10:14 AM
A 308 will get you out to about 800 yards. Unless you really plan to shoot much beyond that, a 308 is a good choice. A friend of mine likes to go a bit further so he went 300 Win Mag as Ammo was still reasonable.

unbind
08-17-2013, 10:33 AM
Ignore the haters- buy what you want before they are not allowed in CA



Some will say that while the .338 Lapua is awesome
Others will say-
$6.00 a shot- ouch
Recoil- ouch
Loud- ouch
Rapid fire will eat the throat in 400-600 rounds- ouch
Real optics- $2k and up- ouch

Have fun- buy any rifle you want


The .338 is an awesome round!!!!!

Ahahaha I'll take that into consideration, money isnt really an object for me but I do want to stop myself from going overboard with a hobby. I'm the type of person who gets into tennis the first week and buys like 9 tennis racquets only to not play tennis in years :) I do want an awesome rifle though that is one of a kind and looks a bit like it came from a video game (to show off). Are all the guns you linked on youtube legal in CA?

hermosabeach
08-17-2013, 10:57 AM
Many guns can be configured to be CA legal under the current laws.

If new to rifles, stop into a local store that carries the most common rifle in America and see what they have in stock.

If you want the .338 then u need to research to see if they can be made CA compliant.

hermosabeach
08-17-2013, 10:58 AM
OP
You mentioned Oak Tree in your post. To take a look and what they have and what they can order.

Thorax
08-17-2013, 11:21 AM
I have a 338-378 Weatherby in a Mark5 deluxe package.
It's very similar to a 338 lapuaa round....it's about 300 fps faster and shoots the same bullet.

Would I recommend it to a newbie ?
Oh hail no!

When I first shot it, it kicked my bootay .....bad, real bad.
Randall will know what this next bit means.
I acquired a full second trigger set (nice when your best friends mom works for Weatherby and you get it for free).
I took it and did a trigger job the *wrong way* so you had no idea when the hammer would drop (it's an angle thing).
I shot it like that for about 200 rounds, until I stopped flinching and fearing for the structural integrity of my shoulder.

I no longer flinch when shooting it and I have long since returned the trigger to a nice 4lb with no creep or overtravel.
I was a very experienced shooter when I first got the rifle and considered myself pretty dang flinch free.

There are some things that you really must experience first hand in order to truly know.
A extreme kicking rifle in a 7.5lb sporter package is a lesson that cannot be learned except by doing.

It is NOT for newbies.....heck, it isn't for most experienced guys.

russ69
08-17-2013, 11:23 AM
Ahahaha I'll take that into consideration, money isnt really an object for me but I do want to stop myself from going overboard with a hobby. I'm the type of person who gets into tennis the first week and buys like 9 tennis racquets only to not play tennis in years :) I do want an awesome rifle though that is one of a kind and looks a bit like it came from a video game (to show off). Are all the guns you linked on youtube legal in CA?

If you want a cool gun, it looks like Oak Tree can set you all up. If you want to be a good shot, you can't buy your way into that, I know, I tried. There is no easy way to learn about guns, it takes time and effort. The direction you are heading is not going to make you a good shot. Shooting will make you a good shot. For most of us, starting with a good bolt action 22LR is the right place to start. You can also start with a good AR-15 RIFLE (not a carbine), they are good shooters. After you become proficient, you can expand into other things. Although I have no problem, if you just want a fancy gun but you'll have to understand that others will know you are a poser, unless you know what you are doing. That takes effort.

AeroEngi
08-17-2013, 11:36 AM
A 308 will get you out to about 800 yards. Unless you really plan to shoot much beyond that, a 308 is a good choice. A friend of mine likes to go a bit further so he went 300 Win Mag as Ammo was still reasonable.

A 308 can get you out to 1,000 yards with the right load.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

unbind
08-17-2013, 11:38 AM
If you want a cool gun, it looks like Oak Tree can set you all up. If you want to be a good shot, you can't buy your way into that, I know, I tried. There is no easy way to learn about guns, it takes time and effort. The direction you are heading is not going to make you a good shot. Shooting will make you a good shot. For most of us, starting with a good bolt action 22LR is the right place to start. You can also start with a good AR-15 RIFLE (not a carbine), they are good shooters. After you become proficient, you can expand into other things. Although I have no problem, if you just want a fancy gun but you'll have to understand that others will know you are a poser, unless you know what you are doing. That takes effort.

Understand everything you're saying, I think I'm going try a couple guns and maybe take a lesson or two at Oak Tree as it is the closest outdoor range to me. I've fired a 22LR when I was really young and remember it firing almost like a toy gun. I am pretty proficient with an AR though and have no problems with tight shot groups from 50-100 yards away. I should not have said I am completely clueless when it comes to rifles, just a little inexperienced. As for the recoil, I am 6'3, 225 lbs and I like guns that have a little kick to them. But like any prudent thing to do, I'm just going to try a few rifles first before committing to any just wanted to know which ones I should be looking at. That's why I came here :)

AeroEngi
08-17-2013, 11:49 AM
I do want an awesome rifle though that is one of a kind and looks a bit like it came from a video game (to show off).

This statement right here tells me that you're not ready for a rifle, especially in 338 Lapua Magnum. Stop thinking about how to make your gun look like something from Call of Duty and start thinking about how to really learn how to shoot with a rifle.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

peppermintman
08-17-2013, 12:00 PM
Understand everything you're saying, I think I'm going try a couple guns and maybe take a lesson or two at Oak Tree as it is the closest outdoor range to me. I've fired a 22LR when I was really young and remember it firing almost like a toy gun. I am pretty proficient with an AR though and have no problems with tight shot groups from 50-100 yards away. I should not have said I am completely clueless when it comes to rifles, just a little inexperienced. As for the recoil, I am 6'3, 225 lbs and I like guns that have a little kick to them. But like any prudent thing to do, I'm just going to try a few rifles first before committing to any just wanted to know which ones I should be looking at. That's why I came here :)

Appleseed does recomment starting off with a 22lr. :D

unbind
08-17-2013, 12:17 PM
This statement right here tells me that you're not ready for a rifle, especially in 338 Lapua Magnum. Stop thinking about how to make your gun look like something from Call of Duty and start thinking about how to really learn how to shoot with a rifle.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

That was wishful thinking after seeing the three youtube videos he posted, the little kid inside me started saying "I want one of those." I have been trying to learn how to shoot a rifle and was wondering which ones I should look at it in order to keep a reference for the future in case I do buy one. Just because someone wants a cool gun they should not learn how to handle and fire a rifle? C'mon bro stop hating

NorCalFocus
08-17-2013, 12:34 PM
If your set against not getting a .22lr trainer, don't jump into a .308. You can get a Rem 700 Varmint in 22-250 and in .233. Both of those rounds will get you to 800yds pretty easy. However, the biggest part of eqiument to overcome, going to the distance isn't the caliber, its the glass.

glock17_1986
08-17-2013, 12:48 PM
Hey OP, this is mu .02 cents. I wanted to get into long range shooting and before asking anyone about it I bought a rem 700 in 7mm rem mag. That was a huge mistake for me. I asked everyone after I bought it and they told me all types of things to do that I didnt. Take the peoples advice who have done this type of shooting for years. Get a 22 and tons of ammo, and you can have enough money for a rem 700 in 308 also with your price range. I made the mistake and paid for it because I had no base skills to go off of. Do your self a favor and go slow so you dont waste your money like I did.

TMB 1
08-17-2013, 2:17 PM
I bet the Savage Long Range Hunter in 7mm Rem mag would be good since you want something more than 308.

Clever
08-18-2013, 1:35 AM
$3000 should get you a Remington or a Savage in 338 and a nice scope.. Try the caliber first.. I have been shooting 338LM for 4 years now.. Stepped up from 300Win.. I love it.

ar15barrels
08-18-2013, 7:15 AM
I have yet to buy my first gun but i just wanted to familiarize myself with some rifles

Anyways I'm looking to expand my horizons and was wondering what rifles you guys can recommend.

a Remington or a Savage in 338 and a nice scope.. Try the caliber first..

Yep.
That just happened.

Clever
08-18-2013, 7:30 AM
Yep.
That just happened.

WHAT HAPPENED? SON

Clever
08-18-2013, 7:38 AM
@ UNBIND
WHERE DO YOU LIVE. I WOULD GLADLY TAKE OUT MY TRG 42 338 LM AND LET YOU SHOOT IT. THE RECOIL ON THIS RIG IS THE LAST THING YOU WOULD BE WORRIED ABOUT. THE POST HAS VERY GOOD ADVISE, BUILDING UP TO THIS CALIBER TAKES ALLOT OF PRACTICE BEHIND SMALLER CALIBERS. BUT IF YOU ARE DEAD SET ON THIS PLATFORM, MY OFFER STANDS.

totus44
08-18-2013, 8:02 AM
OP, having broken into a few expensive hobbies (aka -lifestyles) your very first step needs to be to go see the experts in action. But to be that person that shows up with a note pad and a thirst to learn, then that guy with brand new gear and no clue how to use it. If there are classes or work shops, take them. Then you can start committing capital to invest in equipment, once you have a better sense of the disciplines you want to pursue.

Unfortunately the timing is not on your side here in CA. My suggestion would be to invest in a pair of lower receivers (AR-15 and LR-308) now. There are both semiautomatic and bolt action complete upper options in multiple calibers to choose from. Keep them in a safe and go be a student. You'll know you've learned enough when you have the confidence to post, "this is my first longarm....I went with X after Y, Z....").

Good luck.

BayouBullets
08-20-2013, 8:46 PM
TOTAL agreement with everyone who advised you to learn proper form on a .22 before you ever take a shot with a centerfire. Learn the right way with much less chance of developing bad habits. Then shoot centerfire sparingly while returning to the .22 at 50-100(or .22 WMR at 125-200 for a windy day challenge) frequently. Good breathing and trigger control are SOOOOOO important with the rifle. Habits, habits, habits. Don't even think about what "big gun" you want yet. Start small. You may find that as you mature you are not so easily impressed by the mostest awesomest caliberest bad Boomer available, and find yourself asking questions more like what is the most efficient cartridge I can use in conjunction with my SKILL to get the job done.

bman940
08-21-2013, 5:49 AM
So many great answers and obviously many folks are speaking from personal experience. So much better to learn from someone elses mistakes.
I'd find a freind somewhere who shoots, hopefully a bolt action 22lr and see if they will take you to the range. Be ready to pony up for their generosity, especailly if they provide ammo. I saw a few folks here who invited you as well. Learn the right way to shoot and operate a rifle. A year from now you will be glad you did. Remember,SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY. There is no substitute and many times no second chances! Have fun, shooting is a great sport, my wife,sona nd I spend countless hours a year at the range and in the field,some great times!

Tac driver
08-22-2013, 6:31 PM
Buy something you can afford to shoot. Even reloading 338 is expensive. The problem is if you are not reloading, buying or finding quality ammo for whatever caliber you decide to go with will be pricey and hard to find. My point is if you want to shoot long range (or closer ranges accurately) you have to reload.

bman940
08-23-2013, 5:58 AM
A long range hunting rifle and a 1000 yard rifle are not always the same thing. I agree about going with the .300 Win., you can find ammo and brass easily. Plus the heavier bullet will be influenced less by wind at longer distances. Bottom line though, practice practice practice. I know when I go to ranges over 200 yards it is usually an all day trip. I don't think I have ever come away not learning something new either.

smittty
08-23-2013, 7:52 AM
I read thru the replies and now I'm dummer as a result!

New shooter wants a sniperesk rifle....buy a 22 and put a sniperesk scope on it. Seriously, the goal is to put holes in paper, not kill something. After you master the 22 or upgrade to a 223. Even recommendations for a 308 are stretching it, again the goal is holes in paper, not kill something.

bman940
08-23-2013, 8:59 AM
Smitty, I agree, hard to beat 22 LR for understanding drop, wind and many of the other factors that turn a new shooter into a seasoned shooter. Plus, 22's are just plain fun and affordable to shoot!

frankm
08-23-2013, 8:37 PM
I'm going to vote for the AR in .223 or possibly a bolt action like a Savage 10/11. He's shot it before, and it's relatively cheap to feed. Then he can get a big boy later once he masters it.