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Pugster
01-03-2008, 7:52 AM
When I go practice with my pistol at the range, I notice my hand shakes sometimes and it gives me pretty bad groups at 15 yard (3 - 4 inches). What is the best way to eliminate this? Should I lift more weights to beef up the forearm? I don't think this is a gripping issue since I always make sure I am not squeezing the life out of the pistol with my strong hand.

762cavalier
01-03-2008, 7:55 AM
Well, working on arm strength certainly can't hurt. I get the shakes when handgun shooting sometimes, but all it takes is about 30 rounds of shooting for me to settle in and calm down.Then I do much better.;)

VegasND
01-03-2008, 7:56 AM
A glass of cheap whiskey can help!

Sgt Raven
01-03-2008, 8:22 AM
You can't get rid of shakes or wobble completely. If fact many times the more you fight it, the worse it gets. Iíve found what helps me is dry fire practice with a heavy DA revolver. And jerking the trigger when you think the sights are lined up doesnít help. Smooth pressure on the trigger and a surprise break will go more for tight groups than jerking or slapping the trigger ever will. For most people you should dry fire 10 times for every round you send down range. Dry fire practice can be done at home and you donít need a bunch of special equipment to do it. Just make sure you donít have any live ammo anywhere near you when DF practicing, and donít reload the firearm right after DF practice. Put the firearm away till your mind has time to know youíre done with practice and you wonít have a ND. Itís reloading your practice firearm with live ammo and then picking it back up for one more DF shot that can bite you in the butt. ;)

Stanze
01-03-2008, 8:24 AM
Don't drink caffeine before trigger time.

Soldier415
01-03-2008, 8:30 AM
Lay off the Jenkem on range days

maxicon
01-03-2008, 9:13 AM
I find that heavy-recoiling handguns give me the shakes - mostly my P3AT, but other light handguns with powerful loads will do it. I wait until the end of the range session to shoot them, or they mess up my groups.

Aside from that, practicing and a little light weight work help a lot, as others suggested. I keep 5 and 10 pound weights at my desk at work, and will practice various stances with them when I get a chance.

Likewise, caffiene can contribute. I also find that taking a break partway through the range session helps calm things down.

liketoshoot
01-03-2008, 9:22 AM
try to practice breathing and slow shooting before you use live ammo.

virulosity
01-03-2008, 9:22 AM
Massad Ayoob taught me this technique:
Make fist as hard as you can while slowly pushing your arms down and slowly exhale. When you relax your hands they are now much steadier. Try it!

tankerman
01-03-2008, 9:56 AM
A glass of cheap whiskey can help!
Suggesting alcohol before shooting? Wow, that's some advice.

bbguns44
01-03-2008, 10:03 AM
"A glass of cheap whiskey can help!"

Olympics Biathlon competitors used to drink some alcohol to calm them
down before shooting. Then it was banned.

DVSmith
01-03-2008, 10:14 AM
"A glass of cheap whiskey can help!"

Olympics Biathlon competitors used to drink some alcohol to calm them
down before shooting. Then it was banned.

Suggesting that anyone should consume alcohol before shooting is irresponsible. Sorry.

Mac
01-03-2008, 11:16 AM
....

WokMaster1
01-03-2008, 11:53 AM
Suggesting that anyone should consume alcohol before shooting is irresponsible. Sorry.

You got the wrong guy! Sorry!!!!!!!!:p It was the Vegas guy.

DVSmith
01-03-2008, 12:16 PM
You got the wrong guy! Sorry!!!!!!!!:p It was the Vegas guy.Good point WokMaster1. Sorry bbguns44; I didn't notice the exact quote. Using the board's quote syntax would help a bit.

It is still irresponsible. :eek:

VegasND
01-03-2008, 2:25 PM
It's nice that you want to criticize, but this is the intarweb and advice is probably worth what it cost...

Cazach
01-03-2008, 2:41 PM
Nevermind. I misread the question.

GenLee
01-03-2008, 2:56 PM
If its a wheel gun, try loading every other chamber, shoot...then shoot again with the empty chamber.. See if you are ANTICIPATING the recoil...... This helped me big time tighten up my groups, I was amazed at how much i was "flinching" till i tuned myself with this method....JMHO... actually passed down from a good buddy in Texas but it works ...try it

Sgt Raven
01-03-2008, 3:02 PM
If its a wheel gun, try loading every other chamber, shoot...then shoot again with the empty chamber.. See if you are ANTICIPATING the recoil...... This helped me big time tighten up my groups, I was amazed at how much i was "flinching" till i tuned myself with this method....JMHO... actually passed down from a good buddy in Texas but it works ...try it

Load 2 skip 1 and load 1, then fill the other holes with fired brass. Close your eyes and spin the cylinder and stop it and close it. Then you won't know when a loaded round will come up. ;) Used that while practicing my slow fire, back when I shot Grand Master Class. :D

ar15barrels
01-03-2008, 3:36 PM
Get a 22.
Shoot it, a LOT.

I shoot steel challenge with both a 22 and a 9mm.
I always shoot the stage with the 22 first.
It makes me smoother/faster with the 9mm than if I was not shooting the 22 first.

5968
01-03-2008, 4:33 PM
Get a 22.
Shoot it, a LOT.

I shoot steel challenge with both a 22 and a 9mm.
I always shoot the stage with the 22 first.
It makes me smoother/faster with the 9mm than if I was not shooting the 22 first.

I can't believe it took two pages for someone to bring this up. I improved my accuracy dramatically with pistols and rifles by practicing a lot with 22s. I am in no way saying that you should only practice with 22s either. You need to practice with both.

M. D. Van Norman
01-03-2008, 4:33 PM
Skipping the morning coffee helped me a little bit but not enough to make an important difference. If I ever need to shoot in a real-life situation, Iíll most likely be caffeinated anyway.

psriley
01-03-2008, 6:39 PM
Double up on hearing protection...use plugs and muffs. Muffling the bang helps quite a bit with flinching.

Use the push/pull method. Press forward with your strong arm while pulling back with your weak arm. This will create some (isometric?) resistance that will help keep your wrists locked.

Anticipate that you're going to anticipate. Develop a sense of when it's going to happen and pause long enough to correct it before breaking the shot.

After breaking the shot, only let the trigger release enough to reset. Don't release it all the way.

If you have them, practice with heavier small-caliber guns. If you have access to a 1911, Browning HP, Beretta 92FS, CZ75 in 9mm, those work well for practice. The heavier weight delivers less felt recoil and builds confidence. As has been mention 22lr is good, too.

If you reload make up some lower-pressure rounds, or use some lighter projectiles in your usual calibers.

PressCheck
01-04-2008, 5:34 PM
When you aquire the target just press the trigger, IMHO Trying to get the "perfect" sight picture by taking too long will induse shaking

donger
01-04-2008, 5:42 PM
Dry firing will help a lot. But don't whip out your gun and start jerking the trigger. Aim, concentrate, don't let that front sight move as you pull the trigger. Remember, firing a gun is just dry firing with some noise.

The SoCal Gunner
01-04-2008, 5:58 PM
I get the shakes after shooting a few hundred rounds of .45acp. 9mm and .40s&w doesn't seem to bother me.

Pugster
01-04-2008, 6:51 PM
Thanks to all for the advice.

I have been practicing a lot on my .22 and I found the shaking problem when I placed an Eotech 552 on my Ruger MKIII (with Bull Barrel). I think it's the heavy weight that is straining my arms but I am going to lay off on the caffeine, alcohol, jenkum and whatever else there is out there :P