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View Full Version : What do you really need to Duracoat a rifle?


swift
12-27-2007, 10:08 AM
Is this all that is needed to apply Duracoat to a rifle?
http://www.lauerweaponry.com/index.cfm?Category=218
(+ instructional DVD)
or are there additional items that really should be used?

TonyM
12-27-2007, 3:08 PM
Pretty much all you need.

I use Norrell's, not DuraCoat, and used all of those items, but added the following:

1. Heat Gun to pre-heat parts (makes it almost impossible to get runs in the finish)
2. Oven (makes the finish cure in about 1 hour vs. days).
3. Old Cookie Sheet and aluminum foil for smaller parts that go into the oven (think triggers, hammers, pins, etc).
4. Wire hanger bent and cut to hang receivers/frames from the oven's rack to keep them suspended.
5. Newspaper to line my outdoor bench that I used when spraying the finish.


The only thing that is bad about that kit is that if you have multiple guns to coat, you will want a better airbrush. the internals of that one have plastic and will eventually (read: quickly) start sticking and are not easily cleanable.

TonyM
12-27-2007, 3:12 PM
Forgot one.

0. Go to home Depot and spend $20 or so on a respirator and filters. YOU DO NOT WANT TO BREATH THOSE CHEMICALS.

Oh, If you do the oven route, do it when the wife is out and about. She may or may not be a little ticked off about you using gun parts in the oven.

Norrell's doesn't smell much as when you spray if you're heating the parts that evaporates the thining chemical and reduces the smell once you're ready for the oven. I don't know how bad Duracoat is.

swift
12-27-2007, 6:44 PM
That reminds me of another question: aren't you concerned about putting firearms in the same oven you use to cook food? Any concerns of lead (or some other stuff) contaminating your oven?


Forgot one.

0. Go to home Depot and spend $20 or so on a respirator and filters. YOU DO NOT WANT TO BREATH THOSE CHEMICALS.

Oh, If you do the oven route, do it when the wife is out and about. She may or may not be a little ticked off about you using gun parts in the oven.

Norrell's doesn't smell much as when you spray if you're heating the parts that evaporates the thining chemical and reduces the smell once you're ready for the oven. I don't know how bad Duracoat is.

TonyM
12-27-2007, 7:35 PM
That reminds me of another question: aren't you concerned about putting firearms in the same oven you use to cook food? Any concerns of lead (or some other stuff) contaminating your oven?

I cleaned the guns and parts more than ever, and all got an Acetone scrub before being refinished.

With all the stories I've read, I wasn't worried about contamination. My only worry was that I might completely screw up the finish on the first one I did. ;)

We have since remodeled the kitchen, so I have a nice 4 year old GE Convection oven in the garage now that gets 100% "shop work". :) :D

arfan66
12-28-2007, 12:37 AM
I suggest not buying the airbrush from them. You can get a decent one from an arts & crafts store for around $70 and it wil provide a much better finish and last longer. A compressor is a must as the propellant cans pressure is difficult to regulate (pressure drops as the gas cools during use). I used a cheap Craftsman tire/pool toy inflator and filled a 5 gallon air tank w/pressure regulator for my first paint job.

As TonyM pinted out, a respirator with spare filters is a must. Especially if you use the more potent cleaning solvents like MEK or toluene.

I would also recommend disposable latex/nitrile gloves to minimize skin exposure to paint/solvents.

Good Luck!

5968
01-02-2008, 10:49 PM
I suggest not buying the airbrush from them. You can get a decent one from an arts & crafts store for around $70 and it wil provide a much better finish and last longer. A compressor is a must as the propellant cans pressure is difficult to regulate (pressure drops as the gas cools during use). I used a cheap Craftsman tire/pool toy inflator and filled a 5 gallon air tank w/pressure regulator for my first paint job.

As TonyM pinted out, a respirator with spare filters is a must. Especially if you use the more potent cleaning solvents like MEK or toluene.

I would also recommend disposable latex/nitrile gloves to minimize skin exposure to paint/solvents.

Good Luck!

+1 I bought my airbrush from a hobby shop along with a compressor. My first attempt turned out great. I have since Dura Coated several of my firearms and have done a couple for friends. Just make sure that you properly prep the surfaces!

Prc329
01-02-2008, 11:53 PM
I'm going to attempt my first duracoat this weekend if the weather doesn't go south. There is a great write up on duracoat in this forum. Well actually its how to multi-cam a rifle but it has a lot of info on how to use duracoat.

Prc329
01-02-2008, 11:56 PM
As TonyM pinted out, a respirator with spare filters is a must. Especially if you use the more potent cleaning solvents like MEK or toluene.

I used MEK to strip krylon off of a rifle of mine and I did it completely outdoors. I got a bit toasted by the time I was done and that was outdoors with a slight breeze going on.

Gotta hit home depot tomorrow and get a respirator.

5968
01-03-2008, 2:16 AM
I'm going to attempt my first duracoat this weekend if the weather doesn't go south. There is a great write up on duracoat in this forum. Well actually its how to multi-cam a rifle but it has a lot of info on how to use duracoat.

Good luck. It is pretty easy to apply. Plus you already have done a rifle in the Krylon, so that helps with the nerves. I was worried that I was going to screw up my first rifle. Now I just go to town on them without thinking twice.;)

pklin1297
01-03-2008, 8:55 AM
Prc329: good luck with Duracoat but it is pretty simple to apply. I would definitely suggest the blasting of parts prior to application. This weekend looks like rain through the weekend so you might have to do it in the garage. Only thing about Duracoat is wait time.

I have applied Norrell's Moly Resin to my AR and without blasting, the finish has started to peel and is almost off. My pistol and other AR parts that was applied with Duracoat does not have that problem, but they were blasted prior to give it more "bite".

Swift: should you have reservations about doing it yourself, there is always Drew at Armory Airbrush for Duracoat. Do a search and you'll see posts with his work. I've personally dealt with him and had work done by him so I can vouch for the quality.