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View Full Version : Preferred Break-In Ammo


SDJim
12-11-2007, 8:21 AM
Hopefully, if it dries out some down here in San Diego this weekend, Im planning on taking my new Savage 10FCP out finally get it broken in and sighted.

I have the following ammo available to use for the break-in process:

200+ rds of M852 Match (very small chance of getting more)
60 rds of 118LR (might be able to get more)
500+ rds of Black Hills 168s (can get more)

I also have several hundred pieces of once fired .308 brass (with LC head stamp), both 168 and 175 gr SMKs, RL-15 & IMR 4895 powder, #34 primers and the necessary tools to reload.

Im saving the 118LR for determining bullet drop and establishing a benchmark so the choice is between the M852 and the BH.

Is there any difference or advantage between using either the M852 or the BH for my intended purpose?

Mute
12-11-2007, 8:35 AM
I suggest using the ammo which will be your primary choice in the future. However, it's a good idea to get some data on various ammo and see if their is any change in POI for each.

wildcard
12-11-2007, 9:35 AM
Use the stuff you'll primarily/ exclusively be using in the future. I'm guessing the BH 168s. As for the rest, yank out 20 rounds of each to check for changes in POI after your break in-procedure and stash the rest away. Since there'll be a small liklihood you'll get enough of the other loads to actually practice/ compete/ use, no sense in doing anything with it except stash it or shoot it up.

ocabj
12-11-2007, 10:17 AM
Break-in and sighting in aren't necessarily going to be the same act, so using the same ammo that will be used for most of the future shooting isn't an issue.

I don't think you should be too concerned on what ammo to use for break-in.

Ideally you'd want something with clean burning powder and a bullet with a long bearing surface. That way, it's easy to clean the powder fouling and there's less of it so the jacket can do the real work on what may exist of any tooling marks in the bore. A long bearing surface gives you more bullet to bore contact for this action.

I would break in the gun and sight in after the break-in 'string'. Granted, there's nothing wrong with adjusting your sights or scope after each break-in shot to get it closer to center, but I like to try and shoot a group while breaking in.

Gunner1
12-11-2007, 10:53 AM
I think you will enjoy the FCP. I picked one up about a month ago and have been very pleased with it. I own six Savage Tactical rifles and they are all great shooters. The new detachable mag on the FCP seems to work great also.
I have been a competitive shooter for nearly 20 years and have used all different kinds of break in methods. To be honest I usually just get a couple of boxes of cheap ammo, clean after every shot for the first five then every five rounds until the two boxes are gone. I have been doing this for quite a while with very good results.
I use the Black Hills 168's for match use, However with the recent price increases I will be going back to loading my own again.

Gunner

DJDace
12-11-2007, 3:43 PM
I think you will enjoy the FCP. I picked one up about a month ago and have been very pleased with it. I own six Savage Tactical rifles and they are all great shooters. The new detachable mag on the FCP seems to work great also.
I have been a competitive shooter for nearly 20 years and have used all different kinds of break in methods. To be honest I usually just get a couple of boxes of cheap ammo, clean after every shot for the first five then every five rounds until the two boxes are gone. I have been doing this for quite a while with very good results.
I use the Black Hills 168's for match use, However with the recent price increases I will be going back to loading my own again.

Gunner

I am genuinely not trying to stir the pot, but what do you mean by "good results" with your break in procedure? Have you tried shooting one of your new Savages without a "break in" procedure to compare?

I am honestly just curious what people consider a "good" result from a break in procedure.

Prc329
12-11-2007, 3:50 PM
I never do a brake in procedure on a factory barrel and have had good results. Meaning solid groups and consistency. The gun I sold gunner was not broken in with a "brake in procedure per se. I did clean it, shoot about 20 rounds. Clean it and shoot about 20 more then used whipeout once I got home. i don't really consider that a brake in procedure. Everything I read on brake in basically says unless the maker of your barrel says to do it or void your warranty, don't bother.

PistolPete75
12-11-2007, 5:59 PM
I never do a brake in procedure on a factory barrel and have had good results. Meaning solid groups and consistency. The gun I sold gunner was not broken in with a "brake in procedure per se. I did clean it, shoot about 20 rounds. Clean it and shoot about 20 more then used whipeout once I got home. i don't really consider that a brake in procedure. Everything I read on brake in basically says unless the maker of your barrel says to do it or void your warranty, don't bother.

that's pretty much what i do when i get a new barrel. i just clean it about every 10-20 rounds for a few times and i'm done.

i only shoot jacketed bullets or soft point bullets, and i stay away from the moly stuff.

Gunner1
12-11-2007, 7:41 PM
By good results I merely meant that I have not had any "bad" barrels. I did not mean to suggest it was better than other methods. The rifle I bought from prc329 is the most accurate rifle I have ever owned at ranges under 300 yards. (consistent .27-.35 inch 100 yard groups with Black Hills blue box 69gr SMK if I do my job behind the trigger). It is kind of funny though, my "break in" procedure is just a ritual that I seem to do with every new precision rifle that I buy. I even did it with Nayt's rifle and it was used. I guess it is my way of introducing myself to the rifle.

Gunner