PDA

View Full Version : ultra sonic razor oops shouldn't a cut that


slamfire
12-08-2007, 3:03 PM
123

thmpr
12-08-2007, 3:05 PM
Please use the search fuction....it really helps. :)

http://64.151.69.37/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=49855&highlight=ultra+sonic

Turbinator
12-08-2007, 6:10 PM
I probably posted this before, but I've read that some guns with coated finishes can get ruined by ultrasonic cleaners. I have not tried this myself, but I had read about a SIG with K-Kote going through and the finish came off. I suspect the guns that work best would be blued or parkerized, maybe stainless is ok.

Note that this is just what I've read and should be treated as such.

Turby

BigRich
12-08-2007, 6:38 PM
I use an L&R cleaner. It works very well. You have to do what the instructions say regarding immersion time or it will remove any paint (sights, safe/fire markings etc) on the firearm. Ask me how I know this. The instructions recommend no more than 15 minutes. At 30 minutes the paint markings on my CZ 75B were gone. It did not harm the actual finish. It does a remarkable job on dirt, old lube and firing residue. Normal barrel fouling comes out with a few brush strokes and a patch or two. It is important to replace the lube/rust inhibition with the dunk tank that is supplied with the L&R set up. I have since used it on a variety of handguns with all kinds of finishes. I have had great results.

maxicon
12-08-2007, 9:45 PM
Another thing to watch for with ultrasonics is that they can vibrate parts against each other, marring finishes and causing scuffs. You can get around that by hanging small parts in mesh bags and hanging larger ones on wires, or by using a basket with dividers.

I love mine for small internals. It really makes the crud fly out of a Remington 1100 bolt. If I bought another, I'd try to spring for one big enough for a large handgun frame, but even with a smaller one, I'll rest my Ruger MkII frame it so the chamber's immersed, and it really cleans out the caked .22 grime. I shoot it until it starts to misfire, then clean it, so the crud's pretty heavy by then.

A heated one is great, too, but you don't want to use it with flammable or noxious chemicals. I mostly use dishwasher soap and Simple Green type stuff.

DrjonesUSA
12-10-2007, 5:10 PM
Personally, I think it is a bad idea that could do more harm than good, as others have mentioned. I also believe it is unnecessary.

You'll probably end up damaging your firearms; removing finishes or creating rust before you'll gain any benefit.

They are guns, not surgical instruments or fine jewelry.

That does not mean that you do not take excellent care of them, but it does mean that there are certain ways you go about caring for them, and ultrasonic cleaners is not the way.

I'm curious as to what benefit you hope to gain from ultrasonically cleaning a gun?

SFFRONTMAN
12-10-2007, 5:56 PM
We have a giant one at the store, it just sits in the back. Its a bigger pita to clean our range guns with that than with my hands.

m24armorer
12-10-2007, 8:36 PM
To SFFRONTMAN

I'll buy it!

Sell it!

You just don't need it!

It has hazmats!

I really need a bigger one:jump:


It's good for silencers.

DrjonesUSA
12-10-2007, 10:57 PM
Well as I see it the main benefit is the ultrasonic cleans the gun and you don't


What do you use in the ultrasonic cleaner? I suppose you don't fill it with oil or CLP - you probably have to use water.

Water + guns = rust.

The way I see it, you'd have to spend quite some time oiling down every nook and cranny of your guns after sonic cleaning them to make sure you get all the water out and coat all the surfaces with oil again, as the ultrasonic cleaning would certainly leech all the oil out of the metal.

This just seems like a solution in search of a problem, since you asked for my opinion.

kmca
12-11-2007, 6:39 AM
I use Simple Green (the one that's okay for aluminum) for de-greasing. After that I soak the cleaned parts in diesel fuel. That absorbs the water and leaves a light oil coating on all parts. Blow off the excess, wipe it down, apply grease on the necessary parts and I'm done.

megavolt121
12-11-2007, 7:08 AM
What do you use in the ultrasonic cleaner? I suppose you don't fill it with oil or CLP - you probably have to use water.

Water + guns = rust.

The way I see it, you'd have to spend quite some time oiling down every nook and cranny of your guns after sonic cleaning them to make sure you get all the water out and coat all the surfaces with oil again, as the ultrasonic cleaning would certainly leech all the oil out of the metal.

This just seems like a solution in search of a problem, since you asked for my opinion.

I use Ed's Red cleaner in my ultrasonic cleaner. Cleaning takes 2-3 cycles at 480 seconds and then I'm done. Gun is cleaned and lubed!

maxicon
12-11-2007, 8:59 AM
What do you use in the ultrasonic cleaner? I suppose you don't fill it with oil or CLP - you probably have to use water.

Water + guns = rust.

The way I see it, you'd have to spend quite some time oiling down every nook and cranny of your guns after sonic cleaning them to make sure you get all the water out and coat all the surfaces with oil again, as the ultrasonic cleaning would certainly leech all the oil out of the metal.

This just seems like a solution in search of a problem, since you asked for my opinion.

They're disassembled first, of course, so the individual parts are pretty easy to get dry. I use water with a citrus cleaner, Simple Green type stuff, or dishwashing liquid. It works fine. After they're done, I rinse them in the sink in hot water, then take them out back and blow them out with the air compressor (this is a pretty critical step for me), which removes 98% of the water. After that, I put the parts under a heat lamp, which gets them bone dry, usually while I'm working on the next gun. Oil it as usual afterwards - I do that after cleaning a gun the normal way, too.

Even when I don't use the ultrasonic, when I shoot corrosive ammo (mostly in a CZ52), I take off the grips, pull the slide and barrel, and clean the whole thing under hot soapy water. No problems getting the water out after with the steps above, and I've never had a problem with rust or corrosion, either from the primer salts or the water.

Now, for people who fully clean their guns every time they shoot them, it might be more work than just running a boresnake and a chamber brush through. I'm not a big fan of frequent extensive cleaning, or I'd spend more time cleaning than shooting. My main range guns get cleaned when they start acting up, so they're pretty dirty, and that's a great time to run the parts through the ultrasonic. My main defense guns get a quick cleaning every time I take them out, but not a full breakdown.

I like the idea of an Ed's Red dip, but I'd try it after the ultrasonic step (since my cleaning solution gets really dirty quickly), and would still blow out the excess with the compressor (gotta wear the right clothes for this, I guess).

I find it's a huge time saver, because I tend to obsess about the nooks and crannies once I get started cleaning, and the ultrasonic gets rid of all that crud. Everyone's different, and YMMV, as always.

SFFRONTMAN
12-11-2007, 6:40 PM
Ill let the boss know ;)

DrjonesUSA
12-11-2007, 9:36 PM
I did ask for opinions and I appreciate the replies.Rust is also a concern of mine.Were getting some good tips on how to prevent it.Thanks for bringing it up.


No prob. Frankly, I think this all sounds like waaaaaay more time & effort than traditional cleaning, but I'm learning a thing or two from this thread.

Good luck if you decide to get an ultrasonic cleaner. :)