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skscj
11-27-2007, 7:52 PM
Hi everyone,,my first post,hope its in the right place.
Im a truck driver in No.Ca..I take runs to L.A. to make deliverys..I am at different construction job sites from E-L.A to Watts early morning,nobody around..What do some of you think my chances are of obtaining a concealed carry?? If anything happens the police are there to make reports or put up crime scene tape....THANKS

Ten Rounder
11-27-2007, 7:57 PM
Northern California easily done. I live north and work in the bay area. I would rather carry iron on my belt than wear a toe tag. The further north from HWY 80 the easier the process is for the counties. You should tell us what county you are starting the process in.

Fjold
11-27-2007, 7:58 PM
It depends upon your home county of record. If Northern Ca means SF county your chances are nil.

skscj
11-27-2007, 8:02 PM
Alameda Co.

zinfull
11-27-2007, 8:27 PM
You are next to SF, ie next to nil. Marin and Sonoma are hard to get now days.

Jerry

1911_sfca
11-27-2007, 9:59 PM
Sorry, your chances are next to none for a CCW in Alameda. Consider a truck gun (i.e. 18" shotgun), carry it UNLOADED with shells nearby.

RAD-CDPII
11-27-2007, 10:26 PM
Agree with the above you're pretty well f***ed in Alameda Co., Fremont is worse, the CLEO here only has TWO for city with 210,000 population! And even if you could get one, you would have to post a $1M BOND in the SO's name to get one, probably $2K per year.

Ten Rounder
11-28-2007, 7:15 AM
Alameda Co.

You are toast. I'd say move like I did. I did a pistol class a few years ago and two of the students were truckers from Mt. Shasta with CCW's. They hauled bottled water to LA. Can be done, just move.

4D5auto
11-28-2007, 8:57 AM
I lived in Fremont before moving way up North, they laughed at me when I questioned obtaining a CCW. I've had my CCW now going on 20 years. Recently got my FloriDUH Permit, good for a 5 year period.

Knauga
11-28-2007, 10:54 AM
The US DOT forbids carrying loaded weapons in Commercial (DOT reg'd) trucks CCW or not. 49 CFR 173.54(f)

BTW, in the morning is the best time to be in Watts, it gets hazy after noon :eek:

Bobula
11-28-2007, 1:44 PM
The US DOT forbids carrying loaded weapons in Commercial (DOT reg'd) trucks CCW or not. 49 CFR 173.54(f)

BTW, in the morning is the best time to be in Watts, it gets hazy after noon :eek:

beat me to it

dustoff31
11-28-2007, 2:29 PM
The US DOT forbids carrying loaded weapons in Commercial (DOT reg'd) trucks CCW or not. 49 CFR 173.54(f)

BTW, in the morning is the best time to be in Watts, it gets hazy after noon :eek:

The section that you quoted pertains to the transportation of firearms as freight. Title 49 is after all the HAZMAT regs.

There is no federal prohibition against the driver having a firearm so long as they comply with the appropriate state law. Two examples come immediately to mind:

1. Armored Car Drivers.

2. Passengers on busses may surrender their firearm to the operator for the duration of the trip.

I've carried in the truck with a CCW for years. For CA, i follow the advice given by 1911 sfca.

ohsmily
11-28-2007, 2:37 PM
The US DOT forbids carrying loaded weapons in Commercial (DOT reg'd) trucks CCW or not. 49 CFR 173.54(f)

BTW, in the morning is the best time to be in Watts, it gets hazy after noon :eek:

Did you do this research yourself? Did you read the statute and what section and subsection it falls under?

TITLE 49 -- TRANSPORTATION
SUBTITLE B -- OTHER REGULATIONS RELATING TO TRANSPORTATION
CHAPTER I -- PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
SUBCHAPTER C -- HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS
PART 173 -- SHIPPERS -- GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS
SUBPART C -- DEFINITIONS, CLASSIFICATION AND PACKAGING FOR CLASS 1


49 CFR 173.54

173.54 Forbidden explosives.


Unless otherwise provided in this subchapter, the following explosives shall not be offered for transportation or transported:

(a) An explosive that has not been approved in accordance with 173.56 of this subpart.

(b) An explosive mixture or device containing a chlorate and also containing:

(1) An ammonium salt, including a substituted ammonium or quaternary ammonium salt; or

(2) An acidic substance, including a salt of a weak base and a strong acid.

(c) A leaking or damaged package or article containing an explosive.

(d) Propellants that are unstable, condemned or deteriorated.

(e) Nitroglycerin. diethylene glycol dinitrate, or any other liquid explosives not specifically authorized by this subchapter.

(f) A loaded firearm (except as provided in 49 CFR 1544.219).


This regulation has no bearing on carrying a loaded weapon; it only pertains to shipping or packaging a loaded firearm for transport.

Knauga
11-28-2007, 2:43 PM
Do they distinguish it from freight if it is on your person, or only does having it in the vehicle constitute it as freight? The section just says "A loaded firearm".

The reason I ask is that there are exceptions made, but they mostly pertain to Air Marshals. Air Marshals don't carry loaded firearms as freight, they carry them on their person.

ETA- have been told this by two instructors who teach use of force and also CCW classes.

ohsmily
11-28-2007, 3:01 PM
Do they distinguish it from freight if it is on your person, or only does having it in the vehicle constitute it as freight? The section just says "A loaded firearm".

The reason I ask is that there are exceptions made, but they mostly pertain to Air Marshals. Air Marshals don't carry loaded firearms as freight, they carry them on their person.

ETA- have been told this by two instructors who teach use of force and also CCW classes.

I am not going to take time to research the matter beyond citing the statute...BUT...you'll notice that the section for the statute you cited deals with "SHIPMENTS" and "PACKAGING."

If I feel like it later, perhaps I will do so research on caselaw with regard to this statute. However, as it is written, it appears to only apply to shipment and packaging of loaded firearms, not the carrying of one, concealed or otherwise, for personal defense.

With regard to your CCW instructors...they are not lawyers.

EDIT: After further research of the section this code is in, it appears that this only applies to "shippers" as in the sender of an item...hence the subchapter definition "PART 173 -- SHIPPERS -- GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS." On its face, it is clear this must only apply to shipments and packagings, not the individuals who transport these packages in interstate commerce.

The exception for air marshals must pertain to carrying a firearms in personal items such as a "fanny pack", carry-on bag, or other personal item containing a gun. I agree that the listed exception to the cited statute creates some confusion; however, one should defer to the plain language of the regulation and make the determination based on that.

dustoff31
11-28-2007, 3:09 PM
Do they distinguish it from freight if it is on your person, or only does having it in the vehicle constitute it as freight? The section just says "A loaded firearm".

The reason I ask is that there are exceptions made, but they mostly pertain to Air Marshals. Air Marshals don't carry loaded firearms as freight, they carry them on their person.

ETA- have been told this by two instructors who teach use of force and also CCW classes.

It's distinguished from freight because it's your personal property, just like your logbook, or your extra clothes. It isn't listed on the Bill of Lading. It is not being transported for hire.

Ask those instructors to explain the examples I gave above. Armored car drivers and bus passengers certainly aren't Air Marshalls.

Air Marshall's are however listed on the passenger manifest of the airline. And if you really want to get an eye opener, do some research on being a passenger on a common carrier. You are no more than self-loading freight.

Knauga
11-28-2007, 3:10 PM
With regard to your CCW instructors...they are not lawyers.

Fair enough, but they do teach at their respective law enforcement agencies.

Knauga
11-28-2007, 3:12 PM
It's distinguished from freight because it's your personal property, just like your logbook, or your extra clothes. It isn't listed on the Bill of Lading. It is not being transported for hire.

Ask those instructors to explain the examples I gave above. Armored car drivers and bus passengers certainly aren't Air Marshalls.

I don't doubt what you are saying, fortunatly I won't be concerned with it because I don't drive a truck, just passing on the info that was taught to me.

Are armored cars considered common carriers?

dustoff31
11-28-2007, 3:30 PM
Are armored cars considered common carriers?

They may be a common or a contract carrier. Both must be registered with DOT.