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SeANMcBAY
11-06-2007, 6:37 PM
I recently turned 21 and decided I would like to get and learn to use a handgun for self defense purposes. I would like to get a gun that's easy to learn with with not too expensive ammo but able to stop an attacker with. I plan on this being my only gun for a long while. I was recommended a Ruger GP100 but that gun is quite big for me. I'm not a big guy, about 5'9 and 140 lbs with not big hands. I'm open to both revolvers and semi autos. Plus I'd like a gun that I can eventually be able to carry easy too.

Can you guys give me some suggestions? Thanks.

Wyatt
11-06-2007, 6:44 PM
For a first handgun I'd choose a revolver in .357 that way you can shoot the cheaper .38 special also.
I have owned firearms for the last 18 years and have never had to use a firearm in self defence but it is reassuring i suppose just in case.

mecam
11-06-2007, 6:44 PM
Affordable and cheap ammo? XD-9 or Glock 17

!@#$
11-06-2007, 6:52 PM
glock 19

rorschach
11-06-2007, 6:53 PM
S&W model 66
Glock G17 (G22 if you want a little more oomph)
1911 (just because I think everyone should own one)

All are forgiving for beginners and are formidible in trained hands.

cal
11-06-2007, 6:58 PM
I started shooting with my father's glock 19 and I'm also in the same boat as the original poster, searching for a first gun. Any thoughts on the beretta 92fs?

CWM4A1
11-06-2007, 7:00 PM
I would suggest any center fire caliber semi-auto handgun that allows you to add a .22LR conversion kit, so you can save some money on ammo. G17/22, G19/G23, 1911, BHP and CZ-75 comes to mind.

cgmoe
11-06-2007, 7:00 PM
Glock G19, Springfield Armory XD Service Model 4"

What Just Happened?
11-06-2007, 7:08 PM
If this isn't going to be your only handgun, then I'd suggest that you start off with a .22 That way you can practice to your heart's content and not worry about ammo costs.

Otherwise, I'd suggest a 9mm that can accept a .22 conversion kit. That way you can practice at a very low cost (.22), practice at a reduce cost (9mm full metal jacket), or practice with the stuff for defense (9mm jacketed hollow point).

CWM4A1 has mentioned the ones to really look at. The GLOCK 17 or GLOCK 19 (depending on if you want a full size or a compact) and the CZ-75. Between those two, its a choice of reliable lightweight, plastic covering metal or a heavier full-on steel. Each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Anyway you go, good luck.

apbrian112
11-06-2007, 7:14 PM
Springfield Armory XD-9 or 40 in any barrel length. 9mm is still pretty cheap to shoot but 40's not too bad either... it has a growing aftermarket and shoot pretty well out of the box. they are quite inexpensive and springfield has a lifetime warranty.

CSACANNONEER
11-06-2007, 7:14 PM
Get a big .38/.357! A larger heavier gun is much easier to handle because there is less perceived recoil. Also, a SA/DA revolver is a better choice for handgun for someone's first handgun. In the unlikely event that you would ever need to use it in a self defense situation and have a FTF the next round is just a trigger pull away. I've seen many trained LEOs shooting their first IDPA with a semi-auto and have a stovepipe, faliure to fire or loose mag fall out. Normally, they panic and it takes them at least a few seconds to figure out that there is a problem, a few more seconds to figure out what the problem is and then a few more seconds to figure out how to rectify the problem. Now, at least 10 seconds later, they finally act and fix the problem. 10-15 seconds is a lot of LOST time and in a real situation you will probably be overpowered before you can "fix" a problem. With a revolver, you eliminate this potential problem. BTW, every LEO that I've seen have problems at a match, leaves very happy that he/she found out that with more practice he/she may be able to live though a firefight.

Black Majik
11-06-2007, 7:20 PM
A 9mm centerfire pistol would be great. There are many great platforms chambered in 9mm to consider. Some of the guys have also mentioned .22 conversion kits, which is an excellent idea. .22s are really cheap to shoot so you can practice more, and the low recoil and sound helps in not building bad habits.

CZ has .22 conversion Kadet kits, Glocks have .22 kits, Beretta also.

For 9mm, you can take a look at:
Springfield Armory XD-9
Glock 17 / Glock 19
SIG P226
CZ 75b
HK P2000 / HK USP9
Smith and Wesson M & P 9
Beretta 92FS

Either .22 or 9mm would be an excellent first pistol. Many people also like to recommend a .357 magnum revolver and shoot .38 spl out of it. A good recommendation indeed, but 9mm ammo is cheaper than .38 spl usually.

For .22s:
Browning Buckmark
SIG Trailslide
Ruger Mark III / MkII
Beretta Neos
Ruger 22/45
Smith and Wesson 22a / M41

Good luck and congrats on your first gun!

black_hawk06
11-06-2007, 7:22 PM
IN EITHER .40 OR 9MM COMPACT VERSION......CHECK UM OUT

black_hawk06
11-06-2007, 7:24 PM
ALSO TRY A BERETTA 9000S IF YOU CAN FIND ONE ...HAS LOTS OF OF BELLS AND WHISLES

Druac
11-06-2007, 7:25 PM
XD-9 Tactical is my first semi and I just got it. Great price for the quality and unless you plan on carrying, it will work fine for defending the home. I personally use a revolver and a shotty for home defense, this is my new 'Fun Gun'. :)

mike100
11-06-2007, 7:31 PM
cz-75b in 9mm (for the ammo cost as well as the gun)
k-frame Smith and wesson 38/357 with a smaller grip.
a used 12 ga shotgun (because I know you can scrape up $200 and long guns enjoy much less legal restriction compared to handguns).

Rob P.
11-06-2007, 7:47 PM
What you want/need is a gun that's cheap to buy, cheap to feed and easy to take care of. Right?

Buy a .22 revolver. Forget all the recommendations on Glocks, CZ's M&P's etc. Even the recommendations on .357/.38 special revolvers should be passed by.

Semi auto pistols have lots of little bitty parts that move. Revolvers have only a few itty bitty parts and one big moving part. Simple, easy, and effective. Revolvers are also easy to clean and care for. Semi auto's are more complex and take more understanding to get the best performance out of them.

.357/.38 special revolvers are more expensive to feed than a .22, and have pretty decent recoil. And, you've already mentioned that you have smaller hands and the Ruger seems too large(ish) for you. There ARE smaller revolvers but they weigh less and that means more recoil. Not a good learning situation for a new shooter.

.22 is better for learning to shoot. Low recoil, cheap ammo, and tons of fun to play with. You can either keep it for plinking and buy a second handgun or sell/trade it for something larger later on when you want to move up.

So, buy a .22 revolver with a decent barrel length and have some fun with it. The longer barrel gives a better/longer sight picture for a new shooter over that of a shorter barrel. This means it increases accuracy and gives more shooter satisfaction because you hit what you're aiming at more often.

aca72
11-06-2007, 7:49 PM
+1 to GLOCK 19

Gshock
11-06-2007, 8:02 PM
You definitely need to go to a range and rent some different guns to try out.
Above all you need a gun that is comfortable for you to shoot,
You don't want to end up with a gun that's uncomfortable to shoot, especially
if it is going to be your only gun for a while.

Fobjoe
11-06-2007, 8:11 PM
I assume at your age that you are probably more interested in magazine-fed semi automatic pistols rather than revolvers. XD-45 compact is a good gun on a reasonable budget. Since you say your hands aren't too big, then the compact grip length should be good. If you need more, then use the X-tension to give it the feel of the XD service. Downside (or upside!) to this choice may be the limitation to 45acp. I love this round and shoot it frequently, but the price on frequent shooting may play a factor in your choice. The prices on M&Ps and PX4s these days aren't too great, but they are some of the more comfortable fitting handguns (for me). I would suggest 9mm in either of these. Glock is also always a good option. There...I just made your decision 10x more difficult. You will likely be happy with whatever you get. Good luck

MedSpec65
11-06-2007, 8:19 PM
Browning BuckMark Camper. Real accurate.22LR Target Handgun. Easy to field strip and maintain. It feels good in you hand and is perfect for developing accuracy without also developing a shooting flinch. You should be able to find one available for around $350.00 brand new.
For bigger calibers, I'd echo what's been suggested here by other members, although the CZ 85 Combat has been looking real good to me lately in 9mm. Listed on CZ at $620.00. Your local Gun Shop can usually get it cheaper. If you want to go to .40S&W a Magnum Research "Baby Eagle" (A CZ Clone) made by Israeli Weapons Industries (The famous "Desert Eagle") is a great entry-level, extremely accurate pistol for less than $600.00 if you shop around.

philthy209
11-06-2007, 8:22 PM
glock 17 or 22.

RANGER295
11-06-2007, 8:26 PM
While it is unlikely that you will be in a situation where you need it for defense, I will be the last one to discount the possibility because I have been there, though I did not actually fire my weapon. There fore if it is going to be your only weapon I would go with something other than a .22lr. I would not however buy with carrying specifically in mind at this point. If you get a CCW at some point, get something specifically for that.

My first center fire handgun was a Sig P226. I filled out the DROS for it on my 21st birthday. To this day, it is my favorite sidearm. I have put thousands and thousands of round through it with flawless function. Just recently, a couple of parts started to get sloppy and I sent it back to the factory to be reconditioned and have new night sights put on it. You can not go wrong with this weapon quality wise. Mine is sitting about a foot away on my desk in its M12 holster. Drawbacks to this weapon is that it is expensive and I do not know of any .22lr conversion kits for it. Also some people with small hands do not like it. I am close to your size but have big hands at least lengthwise.

Next option is a 1911. I personally like the Springfield 1911-A1. This weapon is good for small hands. I find it to be a little narrow but still comfortable enough. It is easy to use, reliable, and sturdy. There are many .22lr conversion kits available for them so you can shoot cheap ammo. Draw backs, the .45ACP round is large and has a fair amount of recoil if you are not used to it, not all 1911’s were created equal, they can be a PITA to strip and reassemble if you are not used to it, and they are not a Sig (though Sig does make one).

Next option is a .357 revolver. People have already given the pros and cons of this option. I personally do not like revolvers that much but you cant beat them for simplicity and ease of use. They are easier for a novice to clear. With a revolver you are limited to 6 or in a couple cases 7 rounds and there are no conversion kits for them. Just as a note, if you get a semi auto, make sure you know how to properly clear (unload) it, strip it, and reassemble it. I am sure that a member in your area would be happy to help you with this, I know I would.

Finally, there are all kinds of other semi autos. Some people have mentioned Glocks. I personally hate them but in all fairness they are not a terrible weapon. One advantage to a Glock and some of the others is the availability of the .22 conversion kits. Another weapon that has a quality close or equal to the Sig is an Hk. Whatever you get, it needs to be something that you find comfortable. Go to a gun store and handle them. Narrow it down to a few and go to a range that rents weapons and try them out. Get something that is comfortable to shoot that you enjoy. A good weapon feels natural in your hand. Something that looks cool or is the in thing does you no good if you can’t shoot it or don’t want to shoot it enough to get proficient with it. Good luck on your quest.

Dilinger23
11-06-2007, 8:36 PM
Try out G27 in.40 this should be vervy easyly conseald and its easy to clean...or if you want you cant go wrong with G19.in 9mm theyre both light.and these are able to do the job... I also have small hand and these both guns feel comfortable to me. i hope it works out for you...good luck on your decision...

oghl888
11-06-2007, 9:12 PM
My #1 suggestion is S&W 686, 4 inch. You can dry fire it all day long without any damage, so you can get practice at home any time you want. A double action revolver will really help you learn the art of trigger control.

My #2 suggestion would be a CZ75 with a .22 cadet kit if you want only one gun. The CZ75 is in 9mm, and having a .22 kit allows you to learn to shoot with .22 ammo, which is a lot cheaper than 9mm. 1k rounds of 9mm is ~$140-200, so the savings will add up very quickly.

Dilinger23
11-06-2007, 9:19 PM
+1 on the .22 kit..besides the gun is no fun with out the ammo...:59:

Astig Boy
11-06-2007, 9:24 PM
What you want/need is a gun that's cheap to buy, cheap to feed and easy to take care of. Right?

Buy a .22 revolver. Forget all the recommendations on Glocks, CZ's M&P's etc. Even the recommendations on .357/.38 special revolvers should be passed by.

Semi auto pistols have lots of little bitty parts that move. Revolvers have only a few itty bitty parts and one big moving part. Simple, easy, and effective. Revolvers are also easy to clean and care for. Semi auto's are more complex and take more understanding to get the best performance out of them.

.357/.38 special revolvers are more expensive to feed than a .22, and have pretty decent recoil. And, you've already mentioned that you have smaller hands and the Ruger seems too large(ish) for you. There ARE smaller revolvers but they weigh less and that means more recoil. Not a good learning situation for a new shooter.

.22 is better for learning to shoot. Low recoil, cheap ammo, and tons of fun to play with. You can either keep it for plinking and buy a second handgun or sell/trade it for something larger later on when you want to move up.

So, buy a .22 revolver with a decent barrel length and have some fun with it. The longer barrel gives a better/longer sight picture for a new shooter over that of a shorter barrel. This means it increases accuracy and gives more shooter satisfaction because you hit what you're aiming at more often.

SeANMcBAY just said he would need the pistol for both self-defense and target. A dedicated 22lr would be out of the question.

Id follow RANGER295 advice. Something in a single stack possibly ...a cheap Sig P225 would be good for starters.
CZ-75 w/ 22lr conversion kit would be the route I'd go with. All the CZs and clones in 9mm have slim grips.

rkt88edmo
11-06-2007, 9:38 PM
About the gun being to big for you, the larger and heavier it is, the more the weight of the gun helps tame the felt recoil. A smaller gun will have greater felt recoil in your hands.

Don't count out a dedicated .22lr. It keeps you practicing. Buy whatever you like, chances are you will change your mind later on in any case. I'd vote for a Glock 19 or a full size revolver.

glockk9mm
11-06-2007, 10:34 PM
Like others said. Glock 19

xxG3xx
11-06-2007, 10:39 PM
glock 19

+1:43:

SeANMcBAY
11-06-2007, 10:44 PM
Okay well judging from the answers I got here and some reading I think I will try out the following at a range soon:

G19 (Love the idea of the .22 conversion kits)
XD-9 (I like this gun for its safety features I'm reading about, do they have .22 kits too?)
CZ-75 (Same as the Glock)
1911 (I love WW2 type things so this one seems bad ***)
GP100 (I do think revolvers are awesome and from my understanding you can only have 10 rounds in a magazine legally in CA handguns so why not go with 6 powerful .357 rounds?)

Do these seem like good choices? Any others I should put on my list to try?

Thanks guys for the very fast replies.

RANGER295
11-06-2007, 11:37 PM
Okay well judging from the answers I got here and some reading I think I will try out the following at a range soon:

G19 (Love the idea of the .22 conversion kits)
XD-9 (I like this gun for its safety features I'm reading about, do they have .22 kits too?)
CZ-75 (Same as the Glock)
1911 (I love WW2 type things so this one seems bad ***)
GP100 (I do think revolvers are awesome and from my understanding you can only have 10 rounds in a magazine legally in CA handguns so why not go with 6 powerful .357 rounds?)

Do these seem like good choices? Any others I should put on my list to try?

Thanks guys for the very fast replies.

I would put a Sig on your list to at least check out. I like the P226 but you may prefer something like the P225 which is single stack and has a narrower grip.

echang86
11-07-2007, 12:34 AM
I'm in the same situation as SeANMcBAY, and all these replies are great.

I'm curious about these .22lr conversion kits. Are they easily interchangeable; for example, just swap out the barrel? Or will I have to get a gun smith to do it for me? Are these permanent changes?

What are the pro's/con's of these kits?

TannerBoyl
11-07-2007, 8:46 AM
If you get a chance, go to a range and rent a few guns to see how you shoot them. It may seem expensive at first, but will help you choose the right pistol for you! If that isn't an option, you should head to your local gun shop and fondle as many pistols as possible to see what feels good in your hand.

First, I would decide on a caliber. If you want to shoot cheap, I would go with a 9mm auto. 9mm gives you many options in terms of target and self-defense ammo. It's very readily available and less expensive than most everything else. This is important because you'll need to practice to get proficient (not to mention that it's a lot of fun).

Consider what frame material you want. Some people like polymer frames, others like alloy, still others like steel and steel only. I like all three, but I prefer the weighty steel.

Many have mentioned the Glock 17 or 19. The Glock 17 was my first pistol (my mommy bought it for me when I was 16). :eek: I was 5'10" and 145lbs. It fit me well. Another great polymer is an HK USP (fullsize or compact). I was really surprised at how great it felt in the hand. Springfield makes the XD series which is very nice. I'm not really into them, but can see the good points of the pistol. Among my favorites is the SIG Pro series. I purchased an SP2022 in 9mm for under $500. Everytime I shoot it, I'm reminded what a great pistol it is!

For an alloy frame, I really like the SIG classic series. The ergonomics and function of the pistol is tops! I've read some recent less than stellar reviews of SIGs customer service, so be aware. While the Beretta 92FS grip is kind of large, I have to mention it because it is such a sweet pistol. It's uber smooth to shoot.

For a steel framed pistol, CZ makes some nice ones. They're an excellent value for what kind of pistol you get. SIG also makes steel framed pistols, but they're getting harder and harder to come by. S&W makes some nice steel frame autos. I didn't have much luck in terms of accuracy out of a 4006, but then again my technique was crap at that time. Lastly, there are a few 1911s in 9mm (or .45ACP if you wish) that have steel frames. I'm just waiting for a 9mm in my price range.

If I were you, I would stick with either 9mm, .40S&W or .45ACP. Find one that you like and go with it. While a .22lr pistol would be the cheapest and allow the most practice, I don't think that it would be a well-rounded pistol for fun and defense. Good luck with your decision!

battlehatch
11-07-2007, 8:58 AM
For a starter pistol, I would recommend the Ruger P944D in .40 S&W. The "D" model has a decocker on the safety mechanism. I had one as my first pistol and they are great. SA/DA, easy to clean, reliable, and I can't stress how great the decocker is for entry level. When you are on the firing line and you decide you are done shooting or you just want to put the pistol down, you point it in a safe direction, press the decocking lever and the hammer falls safely. If you want to resume firing, you can just pull the trigger for a double action shot.

If money is no object, then I would recommend the Sig Sauer P226 or P229R in either 9mm or .40 S&W. Similar features to the Ruger but it a much sexier package and better quality IMO.

All in all, there are alot of good guns out there. After all the reading and research I did, I found the best gun: One with which I can hit the target. I can't stress how great a feature a decocker is for entry level, though.

paradox
11-07-2007, 9:20 AM
I'm curious about these .22lr conversion kits. Are they easily interchangeable; for example, just swap out the barrel? Or will I have to get a gun smith to do it for me? Are these permanent changes?

.22 kits for Glocks/1911/CZs replace the entire slide assembly. No permanent changes or smith required.

AfricanHunter
11-07-2007, 9:27 AM
Like has ben said above, you need to go and shoot some/all of the firearms you are considering and then make a decision.

I think you should take a long, hard look at a high end 357 revolver (I like S&W personally). You can shoot 38 in it and it has enough power to be used as a self defense weapon. Also, a revolver is a great first handgun because of its simplicity, reliability, etc...

elbee314
11-07-2007, 10:30 AM
Okay well judging from the answers I got here and some reading I think I will try out the following at a range soon:

G19 (Love the idea of the .22 conversion kits)
XD-9 (I like this gun for its safety features I'm reading about, do they have .22 kits too?)
CZ-75 (Same as the Glock)
1911 (I love WW2 type things so this one seems bad ***)
GP100 (I do think revolvers are awesome and from my understanding you can only have 10 rounds in a magazine legally in CA handguns so why not go with 6 powerful .357 rounds?)

Do these seem like good choices? Any others I should put on my list to try?

Thanks guys for the very fast replies.

It looks to me as though you have plenty of information. I too would put in a vote for a revolver. Medium frame four inch barrel Smith & Wesson, maybe used, would be my first suggestion. Once you get accustomed to gun control you can add all the pistols [semi-automatics] you want. The simplicity and reliability of the revolver is hard to beat, and clean up is a snap. A revolver could actually be cleaned without taking anything apart, a significant advantage if you are unfamiliar with firearms. Also not mentioned, pistols are somewhat susceptible to “limp wristing”, meaning that the shooter does not give the weapon enough of a stable platform for it to use its energy to self load. The revolver is relatively immune to shooter induced issues. Once you get your personal style figured out then you can join the ranks of shooters that seems to acquire multiple weapons, some just for fun, others for purpose.

You are quite correct, I believe, in your assessment that revolvers have more options in ammunition. Both more powerful, and less powerful. The action of a pistol requires that the ammunition provide a fairly consistent power level for proper function.

What ever you do have fun and be safe. Try to find pistol range where you can rent and either have a friend, with experience, help or hire a professional to guide your introduction.

Astig Boy
11-07-2007, 12:21 PM
1911 (I love WW2 type things so this one seems bad ***)


You sound like you would really enjoy a 1911. I have 4 myself, thats how bad the 1911 bug is. The grip is slim, feels prefect in my hand compared to any other pistol. Maybe you should start off with a Springer GI45 or Mil-Spec(400-600 range) or a Kimber Custom II or even a cheapy Armscor/Rock Island(starting to hear a lot of great things about them). And they do make plenty of 22lr conversion kits for the 1911. No gunsmithing required.

My Springer GI45 w/ Ciener 22lr upper.
http://www.fototime.com/6D7DBB11556E116/standard.jpg

SeANMcBAY
11-07-2007, 1:13 PM
So many choices! Yeah I definitely will be trying a lot of guns before I buy one. Can you guys give me a rough estimate on how much it costs to rent handguns at a range? Thanks again.

CSACANNONEER
11-07-2007, 1:26 PM
So many choices! Yeah I definitely will be trying a lot of guns before I buy one. Can you guys give me a rough estimate on how much it costs to rent handguns at a range? Thanks again.

Don't worry. You won't stop at buying just one!

We rent guns for $8.00 for the first one and $6 each for two or more. You also have to pay for the ammo, targets and range fees.

Astig Boy
11-07-2007, 1:35 PM
So many choices! Yeah I definitely will be trying a lot of guns before I buy one. Can you guys give me a rough estimate on how much it costs to rent handguns at a range? Thanks again.


Don't worry. You won't stop at buying just one!

We rent guns for $8.00 for the first one and $6 each for two or more. You also have to pay for the ammo, targets and range fees.

The ammo is where they get you when it comes to renting. Usually, if you rent their gun, you HAVE to buy at least one bag of ammo...which can be $12.99 for 50rds of 9mm reloads. :rolleyes:

RaceDay
11-07-2007, 8:50 PM
+1 on renting somethiing to try out. I like the CZ75 but you'll have to find what fits you and what you like.

Also +1 on more than one. The second thing you'll do after buying your first (the first thing is going to shoot it) is try to figure out what your next gun will be. I thought I was set with what I owned and then I rented a Sig 229 on a business trip and now I've got the bug again.

elbee314
11-07-2007, 9:01 PM
Have to agree on the FACT that you need more than one handgun. Firstly: the little buggers are addictive, secondly, you mentioned SD. In the unfortunate event that you are ever forced to use force the nice men in blue uniforms will be required to remove the evidence. You will then be defenseless at a really bad time, like when you have recently irritated somebody by shooting a member of their gang.

If you can list all of your guns you don’t have nearly enough. Just try to remember in which one of your safes you left the one you are looking for.

mike100
11-07-2007, 9:24 PM
+9000 on getting into the mindset of a second gun when you can afford it.

The good thing about the 22 conversion slides are that you don't have to pay for a background check and suffer for 10 days to get it. You can just mail order them like any regular product. they usually just slide onto the top of your pistol in seconds.

The bad part is that the kits are well over $250 for all but one of the more basic 1911 conversion kits. So figure $300 to have the 22 top end kit. Almost as much as another firearm. I actually bought a ruger 22/45 for $229 back in the 90's and they aren't a heck of a lot more than $300 and something these days. The safety position is the same as a 1911, so if you get one of those, it's nice to only shoot other automatics with similar safety lever placement to avoid confusion. (the cz-75 has controls just like the 1911 as do the hk USP's so they automatically gain favor amongst 1911 fans- usually.

glocks and revolvers have no safety lever and just shoot with trigger pull- they are straight forward and regarded because of this. You may not like the trigger..you'll have to try one out. once again though, revolver can be shot in single action by cocking the hammer, so you always have the target light trigger option with those. revolvers are cool, but man can not survive on bread alone.

Wulf
11-08-2007, 7:06 AM
I second the idea of a Glock 19. Lots of good reasons to recommend it.

- Small enough to conceal should the need arise
- Large enough to shoot as well as a full size gun
- Extreme durability
- Easy to maintain w/out professional gunsmithing services
- 0 rust, cleaning issues
- Cheep 9mm ammo
- Tons of holster and accessory options
- Down the road it will make a great loaner/teacher gun for friends/wives/kids to start out on. Its a gun you'll NEVER have a good reason to sell.
- Learning on a glock trigger (sans manual safety) will build good trigger finger habits you'll carry with you for life
- More accurate as a defensive style HG needs to be.
- Well able to play with reasonable competitiveness at IDPA and USPSA matches.


If you dont get a glock I would caution you NOT to get a DA/SA style gun. IMHO NOBODY needs a gun with two trigger pulls on it. Its hard enough to master one trigger pull. It takes a lot of practice (all done with live ammo) to master the transition, and there are better, more important, shooting issues to work on that overcoming a "feature" built into the gun.