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View Full Version : what is the best .22 pistol for target shooting and copetition?


glockwitknocks
11-06-2007, 4:15 PM
list your top 3 pistol

AJAX22
11-06-2007, 4:19 PM
one of those sako olympic target pistols?

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=83910020

like this one.

followed by the colt woodsman with the elephant ear grips.

and finally those S&W semi auto's... I can't remember the model number, but they made a .22 pelet version as well as a .22LR/.22short version. The non firearm version was for olympic competitors to train with who lived in countries where firearms were prohibited.

gose
11-06-2007, 4:31 PM
Pardini SP
Benelli MP90S WC
Hammerli SP20 RRS

in order of preference. :)

Brownings, Colts, S&Ws or other "cheaper" .22s simply wont match any of the higher end Olympic style .22s.

For less serious practice/plinking/competition, pretty much any .22 will do.

SFFRONTMAN
11-06-2007, 4:36 PM
The smith and wesson you are reffering to is the model 41, a great gun. But however, smith and wesson as of late has had some major quality control problems with their model 41 finishes. If you could find an older model, id go for it. Their new ones however should be avoided until they fix their quality control issues.

COILSPRING
11-06-2007, 4:42 PM
I love both the Walther GSP and S&W Model 41's. I could name another but it would just be filler. Not that there aren't other good rimfire pistols but these are the two I have landed on. When I was a kid, I wanted a Browning Challenger so badly. I think the Challenger and the Medalist are pretty neat as well but I really love early Model 41's. I like the earlier ones with the cocked indicator. In the past I believed that all of the A-series had the indicator but have come to realize that a few later A-series do not. I'd stll say that any A-series Model 41 or earlier is a pretty great .22 autoloader!

I have to say that even a pretty pedestrian Ruger can be a lot of fun. I guess that the most important thing is just to get out there and shoot, whatever it is you have. I love rimfire.

Bronco
11-06-2007, 4:58 PM
Pardini SP
Benelli MP90S WC
Hammerli SP20 RRS

in order of preference. :)



That's a pretty righteous list you have there, gose. :) Can't say as I've ever had the privilege to own any of those, however.

If the OP would be willing to set his sights a tad lower (no pun intended) I can recommend the S&W Mod 41 as a pistol that I'm particularly fond of. I also have a small collection of 60's vintage Hi Standard semi-autos that are very accurate and a lot of fun to shoot.

gose
11-06-2007, 5:09 PM
That's a pretty righteous list you have there, gose. :) Can't say as I've ever had the privilege to own any of those, however.

If the OP would be willing to set his sights a tad lower (no pun intended) I can recommend the S&W Mod 41 as a pistol that I'm particularly fond of. I also have a small collection of 60's vintage Hi Standard semi-autos that are very accurate and a lot of fun to shoot.

Don't get me wrong, Hi-standards, 41s, Buckmarks etc are all fine pistols, but for competitions they're just not as good as the more "serious" pistols. However, unless you're thinking about getting into the ISSF/USAS disciplines, they're probably good enough.

I don't know where the OP resides, but you're more than welcome to try my Pardini if you live in the SF Bay Area.

tzahoy
11-07-2007, 6:04 AM
Browse the Olympic exempt list on the DOJ sight and you'll get a good idea. I shot a Benelli MP90 once and was thoroughly unimpressed with the trigger. In fact it sucked _ss. It's very likely there was something wrong with that example.

I like the more classic oldies like the SW 41 and the High Standards too. They're more versatile for most practice as you can shoot with either hand or both hands comfortably, and theyre very aesthetically pleasing. They'll outshoot you any day. I shot 599/600 at the Monday night PPC with my High Standard Victor, and it seemed easy. Granted this is a pretty easy course of fire. Any Olympic shooter would commit Hari Kari if he didn't hold the x-ring while eating a donut with his offhand shooting that course.

RAD-CDPII
11-07-2007, 7:53 AM
I'm not sure about competition, but I really like the Walther P22 with the 5 inch barrel for a cheap/fun trip to the range. Windage and Elevation adjustible rear sight, good feel and accurate.

AJAX22
11-07-2007, 9:27 AM
I'd really like an opportunity to shoot an olympic target gun side by side with my prewar colt woodsman....

I can't imagine that there can be a significant difference.

ohsmily
11-07-2007, 10:11 AM
I'd really like an opportunity to shoot an olympic target gun side by side with my prewar colt woodsman....

I can't imagine that there can be a significant difference.

There would be a significant difference in a number of ways. The bore axis on olympic pistols is very low reducing recoil for faster target acquisition in rapid fire stages. The grips are fully ergonomic and have a palm shelf and pronounced thumb rest (open class ones have grips that almost completely wrap around the back of the hand). The trigger pull will be much lighter than your woodsman as well. Additionally, the rear sights have a very wide blade which help to insure that you are holding the pistol level and they also have a precisely apportioned sight cutout in the rear to match the front sight width for optimum sight picture.

There is a reason some of those guns cost over $2000.00.

I have a lower level Olympic gun that is very highly thought of for the price. The IZH-35M.
http://izh.petebrunelli.com/izh35Med.jpg
http://izh.petebrunelli.com/
http://hunting.about.com/od/guns/l/aasteaaizh35mb.htm
http://tenring.blogspot.com/2006/03/one-from-vault.html

gose
11-07-2007, 10:16 AM
I'd really like an opportunity to shoot an olympic target gun side by side with my prewar colt woodsman....
I can't imagine that there can be a significant difference.

Maybe...

However, when I was competing and practicing a lot, my reason for getting the best stuff available was that even if the difference barely was noticeable and might only give me a few extra points over a full season, the extra money to get the top-end stuff still paid off. Every extra point over what I was shooting would cost me a lot of extra practice time and money in ammo, so it still made sense and when you're shooting for the top spots, that extra point, or tenth of an inch, might be what stands between you and the gold.

AJAX22
11-07-2007, 10:26 AM
Thats a neat pistol... I've heard good things about those. I just don't know how different they could be.. obviously improvements have been made over the last sixty years, but I wonder how they actually effect performance.

When I get home I'll post pics of my pre war woodsman.

It has very rare bakalite elephant ear grips (similar to the olympic pistols) and the geometry looks to be almost the same.

perhapse the sights are not as good. And the trigger may be slightly heavier.

but I'd still like to run them side by side just to see the difference.

Mine is a really rare factory match target model which is not supposed to exist.

I'm just having difficulty picturing the difference between the two... Its something I'll have to see about trying out sometime.

rawb
11-08-2007, 6:20 AM
I see a good chunk of Pardini's, Model 41's, walthers gsp's on the line for .22
I shoot a marvel conversion and compete with them.

if you go to pilkguns.com you can check out what the olympians use...

Bongos
11-08-2007, 7:09 AM
Smith & Wesson 41
Italy gun (the one in La femme Nikita)
Browning Buckmark
Ruger MKII

AJAX22
11-09-2007, 9:34 AM
here are some pics of my woodsman... it seems to be a predecessor of the olympic target pistols of today.

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u115/Ratduster77/DCP_0369.jpg
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u115/Ratduster77/DCP_0371.jpg

maxicon
11-09-2007, 11:35 AM
I can't speak for all Olympic class pistols, but one thing that would keep the Woodsman from performing in that class is that the front sight and rear sight are on separate assemblies that move relative to each other with each shot.

That is, the front sight's on the barrel, and the rear sight's on the slide, which moves with every shot. While a very tight and precise lockup will allow it to return to a very close alignment each time, that lockup will wear with every shot, and powder residue may cause small shifts as well (I'm not familiar with the internals).

For good long-term repeatability, you really need both sights fixed in relationship to each other, ideally on the same assembly. There may be Olympic class pistols where this isn't the case, but it's just another set of tolerances that need to be accounted for.

Stavros
11-09-2007, 12:30 PM
I have heard good things about the Sig/Hammerli Trailside, the only question is where to find one?

Someguy925
11-09-2007, 12:50 PM
I have heard good things about the Sig/Hammerli Trailside, the only question is where to find one?

I remember asking for one and Ade from Ade's gun shop told me they stop importing them last year. Gunbroker has a few trailsides from what I can search up, http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=84644702.

phish
11-09-2007, 1:29 PM
High Standard, either the Trophy or Victor models

I prefer the Trophy with the 7.5" barrel because of the better sight picture

good examples of the Hamden, CT ones are harder to come by though

I also have a Browning Medalist, but the sight picture isn't as good as the HS. It does feel more comfortable though.

I don't have a 41 yet. It seems everyone thinks the market is in CA, and charges accordingly...

CACitUP
11-09-2007, 3:30 PM
Where did you find the IZH-35M? I didnt think they were readily available here in the states?

Would love to have one. Maybe someone should start importing them again!


There would be a significant difference in a number of ways. The bore axis on olympic pistols is very low reducing recoil for faster target acquisition in rapid fire stages. The grips are fully ergonomic and have a palm shelf and pronounced thumb rest (open class ones have grips that almost completely wrap around the back of the hand). The trigger pull will be much lighter than your woodsman as well. Additionally, the rear sights have a very wide blade which help to insure that you are holding the pistol level and they also have a precisely apportioned sight cutout in the rear to match the front sight width for optimum sight picture.

There is a reason some of those guns cost over $2000.00.

I have a lower level Olympic gun that is very highly thought of for the price. The IZH-35M.
http://izh.petebrunelli.com/izh35Med.jpg
http://izh.petebrunelli.com/
http://hunting.about.com/od/guns/l/aasteaaizh35mb.htm
http://tenring.blogspot.com/2006/03/one-from-vault.html