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View Full Version : Thinking of getting a bore sighter


POINTMANDDT
11-01-2007, 9:54 AM
I'm thinking of getting a laser bore sighter for my PTR 91. Are these things only good for bolt actions? Also, what range do I set it at 25 yrds? Or can I do it at a shorter range? Lastly, I'm looking at the bullet type bore sighter, any recommendations for brand?

wildcard
11-01-2007, 10:10 AM
With a bolt action, a person can just look through the bore and adjust their scope to the same location +2MOA? and pretty much be on paper.

Either way, I think the best thing to do is just fire a few rounds at a hillside or whatever the backstop at your local range is. After you start seeing puffs of dirt where you put your crosshairs, start hitting some paper and get it fine tuned. Boresighter seems to be a waste of money to me. I'd rather fire the additional 5 rounds than use a bore sighter.

Prc329
11-01-2007, 10:18 AM
What I usually do is place my target at 25 to 35 yards. Get on paper and a decent zero for that range. Then move back to 100 and adjust. You should be on paper atleast. Looking down the bore works well also.

aplinker
11-01-2007, 8:18 PM
I would say a boresighter is useless. It only gives you a gross indication of the general direction that your bullet might travel. You can look down the barrel or even line up the ends to get the "windage" adjustment. Elevation can be found by looking for dust.

Sighting in on paper at 25yd then moving to 100 works great, too.

I can't imagine a boresighter saving me more than 2 rounds.

.22guy
11-01-2007, 9:53 PM
I've used a couple of different ones that my friends and family have, and I have found them completly useless.

Just sight the rifle in. Besides is any pull of the trigger not fun?

PistolPete75
11-01-2007, 10:25 PM
yep, i've done the same for all my rifles. old fashioned way of just looking through the bore, and estimate it. take it to 50, then push it back to 100.

Timberwolf
11-01-2007, 10:27 PM
Ditto - take out the bolt, line up the bore with the target & align the scope. Set target at 35 yrd, zero, move target to 100 & fine tune.

By the way I probably average sighting in 5 - 6 rifles per weekend, especially during deer season and this is the technique I use - never fails me.

bruce_ventura
11-01-2007, 11:34 PM
Certainly, you can sight in your rifle several ways. They all work just fine. One thing I've noticed about shooters is they get used to doing things a certain way. Then they take the attitude, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." As I read the threads here suggesting that you shoot extra ammo, or start at the 25 yard target and move to the 100 yard target, I'm thinking that a good boresighter makes a lot of sense. Plus, looking through the bore isn't possible for a Garand type auto-loader and is a pain in the neck for an AR-15.

I'm a family man, so my time at the range is precious. I would rather "get on paper" at home without having to fire a shot or waste time moving between positions at the range, paying for extra targets, etc.

If you share my situation, then pass on the laser boresighters and get a reticle type with adjustable arbors (I have a Bushnell). The later type are far moire versatile. Two extras that you get with these boresighers:

1) You can "level" the scope reticle (get the horizontal lines parallel to the top of your reciever). You do this by removing the scope, inserting the boresighter, and holding a straight edge across a flat part on the top of the receiver. Looking across the top of the straight edge into the boresighter, rotate the boresighter to get the hoizontal lines parallel to the straight edge. Then put the scope back on. With the rings still loose, rotate the scope to get it's reticle parallel to the boresighter reticle.

2) Once you get the rifle sighted in, you can install the boresighter and record the scope crosshair location on the boresighter reticle. If you ever get confused or have to remove the scope, you can easily get it back to "zero" (or close) without firing a shot.

One caviat is that you need an adapter to use the boresighter on an AR-15, because the scope height is too tall for a standard boresighter.

The two problems I have with the laser type boresighter are that the laser spot is too dim to see in bright daylight at any reasonable distance, and I have to mess around a bit to get the scope crosshairs at the correct height above the laser spot. No big deal, but the reticle type is far easier to use and has some bonus uses.

Oh yea, if you use a boresighter at the range, be sure to remove it before taking your first sighting shot!

Bruce

Allent
11-01-2007, 11:56 PM
If you are just looking to buy a bore sight for one gun I probably would not wastes the cash. I have a cheapo from wal-mart that fits different cals. Using the appropriate bushing for the caliber it is inserted into the barrel, then you can line up the scope. I have found that it will get me on paper on the first shot. Which is kind of cool. Like others have said sighting in without is also pretty easy. I like to pick out a rock or dirt clod on the berm behind the targets and aim for that , makes it easy to see your shot and adjust you sight.

maxicon
11-02-2007, 12:01 AM
Simple AR boresighting at home:

Remove the BCG from the upper and prop it on something stable:
http://maxicon.com/guns/ar/ar_boresight_setup_1a.jpg

Look down the barrel and sight it on something easy to spot - this is a mirror ball out in the yard:
http://maxicon.com/guns/ar/ar_barrel_boresight_3.jpg

Adjust the scope so it's centered on the same thing:
http://maxicon.com/guns/ar/mueller_boresight_1a.jpg

That should get you on the paper and save some ammo.

5968
11-19-2007, 8:16 PM
Certainly, you can sight in your rifle several ways. They all work just fine. One thing I've noticed about shooters is they get used to doing things a certain way. Then they take the attitude, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." As I read the threads here suggesting that you shoot extra ammo, or start at the 25 yard target and move to the 100 yard target, I'm thinking that a good boresighter makes a lot of sense. Plus, looking through the bore isn't possible for a Garand type auto-loader and is a pain in the neck for an AR-15.

I'm a family man, so my time at the range is precious. I would rather "get on paper" at home without having to fire a shot or waste time moving between positions at the range, paying for extra targets, etc.

If you share my situation, then pass on the laser boresighters and get a reticle type with adjustable arbors (I have a Bushnell). The later type are far moire versatile. Two extras that you get with these boresighers:

1) You can "level" the scope reticle (get the horizontal lines parallel to the top of your reciever). You do this by removing the scope, inserting the boresighter, and holding a straight edge across a flat part on the top of the receiver. Looking across the top of the straight edge into the boresighter, rotate the boresighter to get the hoizontal lines parallel to the straight edge. Then put the scope back on. With the rings still loose, rotate the scope to get it's reticle parallel to the boresighter reticle.

2) Once you get the rifle sighted in, you can install the boresighter and record the scope crosshair location on the boresighter reticle. If you ever get confused or have to remove the scope, you can easily get it back to "zero" (or close) without firing a shot.

One caviat is that you need an adapter to use the boresighter on an AR-15, because the scope height is too tall for a standard boresighter.

The two problems I have with the laser type boresighter are that the laser spot is too dim to see in bright daylight at any reasonable distance, and I have to mess around a bit to get the scope crosshairs at the correct height above the laser spot. No big deal, but the reticle type is far easier to use and has some bonus uses.

Oh yea, if you use a boresighter at the range, be sure to remove it before taking your first sighting shot!

Bruce

I have never had any luck with the laser bore sighters; however one like what Bruce talks about might be alright. Guess I'll have to pick one up and give it a try.

nikonuser
08-12-2008, 10:20 AM
Good info here for doing your homework at home before you go to the range. I hope my neighbor wouldnt mind using his house as an aimpoint. Agree on not buying useless laser boresighter since the laser gets lost in the bright sun. I owned one and never used it again.

westcoastr
08-13-2008, 5:50 AM
this is a timely thread. if you pay a shop to get a scope mounted how close to center would you expect it to be? if it was high and right by 16" each at 100 yds would you guys consider that getting your money's worth? seems i could have done that myself. my scope has 64" of adjustment range so there is plenty of room, but seems like a poor job for a pro.

since the scope is now so for "off-center", will there be any issues with POI/POA at other various ranges?