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Shotgun Man
10-21-2007, 5:11 PM
Hi. I recently acquired a Ruger P95PR (manual safety version). It is my first semiautomatic pistol.

When I rack the slide with the magazine in the gun, the slide stop locks it open. I have to affirmatively hold it down while racking it to avoid this.

Are all currently manufactured pistols so configured? I think it would be better to have to affirmatively push up the slide stop if you want the slide to lock open. When the magazine is not seated, this is how gun operates. Why was it designed that way?

Usually, wouldn't I just want the slide to fly forward and rack a cartridge(especially in a tactical situation) without having to fiddle with the slide stop?

Also I'm right-handed, and I find I can't manually cock the hammer with the my right thumb while still holding the gun in a more or less ready-to-fire position with my bottom three fingers encircling the grip. I have to use my left thumb, then reposition my left hand in its support position. Is that normal?

Anyway, you guys got a great forum here. I've enjoyed reading many of your threads. Thanks.

aplinker
10-21-2007, 5:18 PM
If the magazine is EMPTY then the slide will be stopped by the slide stop. This is so the slide stays open when the magazine is empty. If you drop the mag, it will slide just fine, as it would if there were a cartridge in the magazine. It's the way it should operate. If it did not, the slide would close on an empty magazine.

Cocking the hammer is unlikely to be ergonomic on a semi-. There's little reason to do this. With a DA/SA, you'd pull the trigger through DA. With SAO, like 1911s, you'd really never want to have the hammer down on a chambered round. With a 1911 it's actually quite dangerous. You've been watching too many movies ;)

Hi. I recently acquired a Ruger P95PR (manual safety version). It is my first semiautomatic pistol.

When I rack the slide with the magazine in the gun, the slide stop locks it open. I have to affirmatively hold it down while racking it to avoid this.

Are all currently manufactured pistols so configured? I think it would be better to have to affirmatively push up the slide stop if you want the slide to lock open. When the magazine is not seated, this is how gun operates. Why was it designed that way?

Usually, wouldn't I just want the slide to fly forward and rack a cartridge(especially in a tactical situation) without having to fiddle with the slide stop?

Also I'm right-handed, and I find I can't manually cock the hammer with the my right thumb while still holding the gun in a more or less ready-to-fire position with my bottom three fingers encircling the grip. I have to use my left thumb, then reposition my left hand in its support position. Is that normal?

Anyway, you guys got a great forum here. I've enjoyed reading many of your threads. Thanks.

Shotgun Man
10-21-2007, 5:30 PM
Okay, that's helpful. So if I put a full magazine in there, the slide would fly forward. That makes sense. I had fired the gun at the range during the waiting period, but I obviously didn't remember that.

I wonder whether I got the wrong gun for me, because the DA action requires me to bring the trigger pretty far back. I wonder if my fingers are too long to do this efficiently.

Thanks for the advice. I was just practicing in my house, wondering why the slide wouldn't fly forward. Empty magazine. Makes sense.

bwiese
10-21-2007, 11:50 PM
I wonder whether I got the wrong gun for me, because the DA action requires me to bring the trigger pretty far back. I wonder if my fingers are too long to do this efficiently.

Your gun (unless you have a fairly unusual "DAO"='double action only' variant) is a DA/SA gun. That is, the gun can be initially fired (w/hammer down, uncocked) with the long double-action trigger stroke - but subsequent rounds fired after the first one re-cock the gun so these rounds are fired in SA (single-action) mode which uses far less trigger travel/pull.

Quiet
10-22-2007, 1:23 AM
So if I put a full magazine in there, the slide would fly forward.
When the slide is locked back and you insert a loaded magazine, the slide will not go into battery by itself. You will need to use (press down on) the slide stop/release or rack (pull) the slide back for it to go into battery.

thefinger
10-22-2007, 1:45 AM
Sounds like next time you take your gun to the range you should find someone at the pistol range and ask them about the general mechanics and operations of a semi-auto pistol. The mechanisms and operations are easy to understand once someone shows you what they are. We were all noobs at some point.:p

dee-vee
10-22-2007, 5:18 AM
Dont shoot your eye out. hehe. Good luck.

-hanko
10-22-2007, 5:36 AM
Did you get manual with the gun??:rolleyes:

If not, you'll find it here...http://www.ruger.com/Firearms/PDF/InstructionManuals/58.pdf

Check p. 10. Actually, might be a good idea to read the whole thing.

-hanko

donger
10-22-2007, 7:04 AM
Try to be nice fellas.

Welcome to Calguns and be safe.

Two Shots
10-22-2007, 8:18 AM
First Welcome to Calguns you'll find great info here.
I own a older Ruger P85 and it does take time to get used to it. Mine has been reliable over the years. Your right about the trigger it does have a long pull and will take some getting used to. If you go to the range ask another shooter as Thefinger said most people are happy to help. If thiers a range master he may be able to help you out. If you post your area maybe someone on here could meet you at a range and do some training with you.
If your in the San Joaquin Valley (Modesto area) I would be happy to help you at the range.

Kruzr
10-22-2007, 9:28 AM
No offense, but I'd strongly suggest you take a class and learn how to use and operate a semi-auto. You need to get a basic understanding of how your pistol works. BTW, there is never a reason to manually cock the hammer on a P95.

maxicon
10-22-2007, 9:52 AM
One of the few drawbacks of the Ruger P95 is the long DA trigger, IMO. By design, you can't carry the standard P95 cocked-and-locked (cocked with the safety on), as putting the safety on drops the hammer against the hammer block (always have the gun pointed in a safe direction when you do this!).

So, there will typically be 3 scenarios for the first shot.

- You've put a fresh mag in, racked the slide to load the first round, and are ready to fire. The hammer will be cocked from racking the slide, so you'll get the SA pull on the first round and every round after.

- You've put a fresh mag in, racked the slide to load the first round, and are going to put the gun away in a holster/bedstand/whatever for defense use, leaving the hammer cocked. This is slightly less safe than the next scenario, as it takes less to pull the trigger, but some people prefer this as the first shot is SA and is likely to be more accurate.

- You've put a fresh mag in, racked the slide to load the first round, then put the safety on, which drops the hammer, and put it away for defensive use. In this case, once the safety's off, the first shot will be DA, unless you cock the hammer manually so you get the shorter, smoother SA first shot. Which you do depends on how much time you have. It's not a bad idea to practice with the first shot DA, as this is the safest way to leave the P95 for defense or carry.

Once the slide locks back on an empty mag, you drop the mag, insert a fresh one, and either thumb the slide release or pull the slide back and release. This loads a fresh round from the new mag, and you're ready to go in SA mode with a cocked hammer.

Many experts recommend pulling the slide instead of using the slide release lever, as it requires less fine motor control, but whatever it is you practice regularly is what your hands will do when the adrenaline's flowing. You'll see arguments for both ways - it's a personal choice, and a good one to think about as you practice.