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FastFinger
09-27-2007, 9:28 AM
I have a Ruger MKII that I thought I'd clean up a bit. Started with a field strip, but unlike most MKIIs my mainspring pin doesn't come out too easily, in fact I need to use a punch to drive it out. Getting it back in is even harder.

While securing the frame to knock in the pin I scratched and put a few marks on it. I tried steel wool to smooth out the marks, but no go. I don't think I need to resort to a file, but maybe a Dremel?

Any tips on how to proceed?
Also I'll need to re-blue or touch up the blueing in some areas, what's a good blueing agent to use, hopefully available in the Hollywood area, and do you have any blueing tips?

Thanks!

-hanko
09-27-2007, 2:09 PM
I have a Ruger MKII that I thought I'd clean up a bit. Started with a field strip, but unlike most MKIIs my mainspring pin doesn't come out too easily, in fact I need to use a punch to drive it out. Getting it back in is even harder.

While securing the frame to knock in the pin I scratched and put a few marks on it. I tried steel wool to smooth out the marks, but no go. I don't think I need to resort to a file, but maybe a Dremel?

Any tips on how to proceed?
Also I'll need to re-blue or touch up the blueing in some areas, what's a good blueing agent to use, hopefully available in the Hollywood area, and do you have any blueing tips?

Thanks!
Try cloth backed abrasive paper...maybe 220 or 320 grit size.

I like oxpho blue from Brownells...it's a cold blue that is very nice for touch up stuff. Easy to use and wears well for a cold blue. Before you blue, make sure what you're bluing is completely FREE of dirt/oil/fingerprints/etc. 75 per cent of a good blueing job involves preparation;) Wear rubber gloves. Get some swabs and pipe cleaners for small parts & a clean scrap t-shirt for big pieces. DO NOT put anything you've used to apply blueing BACK in the bottle if you need more blueing...use a fresh cloth or swab or pipecleaner.

You can download more info than I can remember from Brownells web site. You picked an ideal gun to practice with.

-hanko

FastFinger
09-28-2007, 8:50 AM
You picked an ideal gun to practice with.

-hanko

To be honest I wish I didn't need the practice, but you're right, this is a good candidate to start with.


I'm somewhat handy with most typical home and car fixes, but I've always shied away from metal work. Maybe because screw-ups can be so permanent.

But this Ruger is a plinker I've had for years, and for years I've wanted to try a little gunsmithing 101, so this might work out ok.

Is there any good online resource that has a library of general gunsmith tips, tools to use, techniques etc?


Thanks for the tips!

-hanko
09-28-2007, 2:05 PM
Is there any good online resource that has a library of general gunsmith tips, tools to use, techniques etc?


Thanks for the tips!
www.brownells.com (http://www.brownells.com)

-hanko

FastFinger
09-29-2007, 5:32 PM
www.brownells.com (http://www.brownells.com)

-hanko

Thanks! Ordered their catalog and a basic gunsmithing book.

-hanko
09-29-2007, 8:04 PM
Thanks! Ordered their catalog and a basic gunsmithing book.
Don't let a credit card get too close to the catalog;)

-hanko

ar15barrels
09-29-2007, 11:09 PM
Don't let a credit card get too close to the catalog

:rofl2:

Wiser words have never been spoken.

NeoWeird
09-29-2007, 11:32 PM
All I have to say is if you think a dremel is a better answer than a hand file then PLEASE stay away from my guns.

Keep in mind if you have a blued gun and you GOUGED the metal it will require metal removal and that will remove finish. Obiovusly this will make a big spot. Partial refinishing will produce horrible results. Even if finished inthe EXACT same manner as the original finish it will be noticed that it was refinished at one point in time. If you're ever seen painted words that have been painted over you will know that they ALWAYS show through unless properly preped and having the entire thing refinished - this goes for houses, cars, billboards, etc.

So if you looking for a small spot fix to just blend it in so you have a slightly lighter/darker spot in one tiny spot than shiny metal against a blued gackground then you will be ok, but if you are planning on removing the finish over a small area and then refinish you will end up with a gun that looks like a mulit-colored cow. My advice is leave good enough alone or do the whole thing right the first time and do the WHOLE thing. Another option is of course to remove ALL the finish and get it down to a nice polished shine and have a stainless steel look or a bi-tone look. Another option is also a layered inish like Duracoat or Molyresin.

Good luck and let us know how it goes out.

And yes, GREAT advice to keep your credit card away from the Brownells book. It's also a very good idea to keep the catalog away from the bed, desk, and crapper - or anywhere else where heavy thinking while reading is done.

Ghugly
10-06-2007, 11:53 AM
Just a thought and probably not useful to the discussion. I've heard, on several occasions, that Ruger is a pretty amazing company to deal with. I've heard of a few people who have sent their guns to Ruger, for out of warranty repair, that got them back refinished to like new condition for very little money. One, in particular, was a MKII pawn shop find that was really in rough shape. He said that when he got it back it looked like a new gun.