PDA

View Full Version : Question for Gov't agencies


tankerman
09-08-2007, 5:42 AM
Since we alk know this sight is monitored by several government agencies, BATF, DOJ, and various local law enforcement perhaps we should have a forum to ask them questions relating to their area of expertise or regulation.

I am not talking about a forum for pissed off people that want everyone how much they dislike the government.

A place you could ask question about policy, regulations etc...

I don't know that any of the threads would ever get a response from anyone at one of the aforementioned agencies will ever respond, but we'll never know unless we try.

We are the American tax paying public, so they do work for us. Hopefully they would show us enough respect and we would get a response on occasion or maybe even fairly often

Dont Tread on Me
09-08-2007, 8:20 AM
Who killed Kennedy? Alison and Iggy, that may be above your pay grade but post if you know.

dustoff31
09-08-2007, 10:01 AM
Since we alk know this sight is monitored by several government agencies, BATF, DOJ, and various local law enforcement perhaps we should have a forum to ask them questions relating to their area of expertise or regulation.

This is a great idea, if there were some way to be sure we didn't just get a bunch of Iggy's spreading FUD.

SemiAutoSam
09-08-2007, 10:32 AM
By what process was the 16th Amendment ratified.

And just because philander Knox reported to the head monkey in federal Government that it was does not make it so if it wasn't ratified in a correct and accepted manner.


Bill Benson who wrote the book at this website states that it was not ratified correctly and that its VOID because of this fact. No matter what those at the IRS say.
http://www.thelawthatneverwas.com/new/home.asp

The authority of the federal government to collect its income tax depends upon the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the federal income tax amendment, which was allegedly ratified in 1913. After a year of extensive research, Bill Benson discovered that the 16th Amendment was not ratified by the required 3/4 of the states, but nevertheless Secretary of State Philander Knox fraudulently announced ratification.



The Discovery

Article V of the U.S. Constitution specifies the ratification process, and requires 3/4 of the States to ratify any amendment proposed by Congress. There were 48 States in the American Union in 1913, meaning that affirmative action of 36 states was required for ratification. In February, 1913, Secretary of State Philander Knox issued a proclamation claiming that 38 states had ratified the amendment.

In 1984, William J. Benson began a research project, never before performed, to investigate the process of ratification of the 16th Amendment. After traveling to the capitols of the New England states, and reviewing the journals of the state legislative bodies, he saw that many states had not ratified the Amendment. Continuing his research at the National Archives in Washington, DC, Bill Benson discovered his Golden Key.
http://www.thelawthatneverwas.com/new/goldenkey.asp
This damning piece of evidence is a 16 page memorandum from the Solicitor of the Department of State, whose duty is the provision of legal opinions for the use of the Secretary of State. In this memorandum sent to the Secretary of State, the Solicitor of the Department of State lists the many errors he found in the ratification process!

The 4 states listed below are among the 38 states that Philander Knox claimed ratification from.

The Kentucky Senate voted upon the resolution, but rejected it by a vote of 9 in favor and 22 opposed.
The Oklahoma Senate amended the language of the 16th Amendment to have a precisely opposite meaning.
The California legislative assembly never recorded any vote upon any proposal to adopt the amendment proposed by Congress.
The State of Minnesota sent nothing to the Secretary of State in Washington.
When his year long project was finished at the end of 1984, Bill had visited every state capitol and knew that not a single state had actually and legally ratified the proposal to amend the Constitution. 33 states engaged in the unauthorized activity of amending the language of the amendment proposed by congress, a power the states do not possess. Since 36 states were needed for ratification, the failure of 13 to ratify would be fatal to the amendment, and this occurs within the major (first three) defects tabulated in Defects in Ratification of the 16th Amendment.
http://www.thelawthatneverwas.com/new/ratification.asp
Even if we were to ignore defects of spelling, capitalization, and punctuation, we would still have only 2 states which successfully ratified.





I suppose I would only be satisfied by a independent audit of the states that sent in paperwork to confirm or deny Bill Benson's claims.

Quiet
09-08-2007, 11:23 AM
A place you could ask question about policy, regulations etc...

This would be a very good idea and helpfull for us law-abiding citizens.

However, it really is up the law enforcement/government to responded to this.

I know "hackers" have Q&A sessions with federal LE agencies (FBI, USSS, NSA, etc.) at "hacker" conventions (ie. Defcon), in order to determine what's legal or illegal in pertaining to information security.

So, I can't see why state/federal law enforcement agencies (CA DOJ & BATFE) can't have offical representation on this forum for Q&A.

MedSpec65
09-08-2007, 11:54 AM
Let 'em lurk. I'm no criminal and never will be.