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Mottmcfly
01-14-2013, 8:25 AM
I apologize if this has been covered already. The search function leaves something to be desired.

With the dropping temps in SoCal, I'm starting to think more about the ability to safely provide heat for my family. We have twin infants to bugging out isn't really in the game plan as of yet.

I keep three 20lb tanks of propane and the usual assortment of mylar blankets etc..

Can I ask what solutions you guys are liking?

Thank you in advance,

Marty

TheChief
01-14-2013, 8:35 AM
Need a bit more...what situation are you looking at? Bug in, bug our, stuck in the vehicle? Long term or short term, etc. What is the coldest temperature you expect?

Fireplace - many chords of wood

Geotherm

Gas NG or propane heaters

Blankets and clothing alone will require lots of high caloirie food and expect to be miserable

My plan is to seal off most of the house and live in one of the rooms with the wood burning stove. I have a enough wood stacked in the back yard that will get me through an entire winter.

Cooking will be done via gas and charcoal.

Also have plenty of wool blankets and bedding for the cold nights.

ElDub1950
01-14-2013, 8:41 AM
you mentioned propane but didn't say what you would do with it.

keep the carbon monoxide problem in mind when thinking about in home heating. You need a vented system like a fire place or wood burning stove.

Californio
01-14-2013, 8:43 AM
Bibbed down filled powder pants, down jacket, insulated gloves, watch cap, uggs and boots, vapor barrier skins layered under, down bag for each person.

I swear by good old 800 fill goose down.

Dubious_Beans
01-14-2013, 8:46 AM
I do this:

http://www.weirdstuffwemake.com/blackhole/images/firewood_2012.jpg

Mottmcfly
01-14-2013, 9:11 AM
Thank you everyone. As mentioned, a bug out is really not realistic so an in-home solution is what I'm looking for. I do have propane and up until now only planned on using it for cooking/boiling water. I understand using it for indoor heating can introduce quite a bit of risk.

I think the clothing/fireplace options are going to work out best.

Again, thanks for everyone's input.

Mott

Decoligny
01-14-2013, 9:54 AM
Do not know how much room you have in your home, or whether you are in an are where burning wood is an option. If you have the room and can burn wood, check out building a rocket mass heater. They burn efficiently, and don't spew heat out of a chimney. The exhaust is only slightly above room temperature. They take about 1/10 the amount of wood as a wood stove to heat a house. The heat is stored in a thermal mass and is slowly released over a period of about 24 hours.

Mottmcfly
01-14-2013, 10:04 AM
Do not know how much room you have in your home, or whether you are in an are where burning wood is an option. If you have the room and can burn wood, check out building a rocket mass heater. They burn efficiently, and don't spew heat out of a chimney. The exhaust is only slightly above room temperature. They take about 1/10 the amount of wood as a wood stove to heat a house. The heat is stored in a thermal mass and is slowly released over a period of about 24 hours.

Thank you.

tommyboy619
01-14-2013, 10:18 AM
I was in the same boat as you. So I bought a Mr. Heater Portable Buddy, conversion hose, filter and extra propane tanks. They're safe for indoor use and everything can be had for @ $100 (not including propane).

Oh and good luck with the twins :) My boys just turned 2. Nothing like getting the 2 for 1 special.

bombadillo
01-14-2013, 10:34 AM
IF there were no natural gas or electricity, it would be wood, warm clothing, and propane heat.

ElvenSoul
01-14-2013, 2:58 PM
Amk Heetsheets
Wool Blankets
Down Sleeping Quilt
Winter Sock for my Hammock and Underquilt
Under Armour Winter Thermals
Wool Shirt
Wool Fleece Jacket
Wool Socks
Caribou II Boots

Current Temp at 1756 hrs in Caseyville, Il is 2
Now I'll get back to eating my sammich

Sunday
02-01-2013, 2:19 PM
Yep you need lots of warm clothing and bedding. Ask how the natives in Alaska used to survive the cold.

Onetyme
02-02-2013, 9:09 PM
Consider 1 or 2 of these as a possible solution. Granted you'll have to find a way to keep them charged.

Www.mrheaterhero.com

Cali-Glock
02-02-2013, 9:38 PM
Where in so-cal? I live in the sierras meaning SNOW and I have an OLD home; we heat with wood, but the reality is we could live with no heat: when i was single I frequently was to lazy to light a fire.

Just bundle up a bit!

Intimid8tor
02-02-2013, 9:43 PM
I was in the same boat as you. So I bought a Mr. Heater Portable Buddy, conversion hose, filter and extra propane tanks. They're safe for indoor use and everything can be had for @ $100 (not including propane).

Oh and good luck with the twins :) My boys just turned 2. Nothing like getting the 2 for 1 special.

I have a Mr. Heater as well. One word of advice, run it for a few hours before you store it away. Mine sat in it's box for about 5 years. After running it for a few hours, the fan inside broke all the mounting points. Had I run it when I first got it, it would have been under warranty.

In addition to that, I also have a kerosene space heater that can be used to heat a smaller area. It is indoor safe as well. I would make sure you have carbon monoxide detectors (you should anyway) as a failsafe.

Mottmcfly
02-05-2013, 2:10 PM
Thank everyone!

ElvenSoul
02-05-2013, 2:37 PM
I'm allergic to goose down, but I hear a lot of people rave about goose down booties.

wjc
02-05-2013, 7:53 PM
Propane. I keep it for the bbq but I'm going to buy a heater that connects to the tanks.

I also keep Sterno for a quick and dirty heat source.

badreligion
02-05-2013, 9:15 PM
I envy those of you with a working fireplace which actually heats your home, what a great built in prep item. Going back on topic for the OP, if your like myself and the typical American family you generate a lot of recyclable material from cardboard boxes, news papers and junk mail. Look into self made fire briquettes and a Peterson press, lots of info around the web and on you tube channels. I just started collecting my paper waste products in the last month and now have several 35 gallon bags filled with shredded paper. I have a green waste trash can filled with mostly dry leave also. Plan to build a press next weekend and get started. Really simple way to make your paper and yard wastes actually work for you instead of working for your city, plus except the materials to build the press, a few mixing/mash buckets and a couple of gallons of city water it is basically free fire making material.

Toyman321
02-05-2013, 10:56 PM
Never tried it but:

http://knowledgepublications.com/heat/images/Solar_Air_Window_Box_Collectors.gif

kaligaran
02-06-2013, 10:00 AM
Wool, definitly wool. Maintains most of it's heat retention even when wet.
Downside is it's heavy.

Get a tri-fuel generator and a very small space heater (ceramic would be a good option like they sell at costco b/c they are cool to the touch which is good for babies in the area) if a wood stove isn't an option. Start storing fuel when prices are low and rotate it regularly (stabil is a good option too).

Make sure you have plywood to cover windows (if you had a broken window from an earthquake or storm, a blanket isn't enough to insulate and keep the elements out).

Lifeon2whls
02-06-2013, 10:50 AM
Unless you're in one of the micro climates around Pasadena that might get a bit colder, we tend to see it drop to near freezing mid-winter a couple days during the season and the into the 40's for the majority of it. Given how much sun we tend to get, you should be able to maintain a livable temperature (with heavy clothes) in the house by increasing the amount of insulation you have, improving any of the older windows in the house, sealing drafts, etc. These improvements will help lower costs anyway and pay you back in the long run...a lot more than the likely hood of having to use any of the stores you considering for a SHTF scenario.

That said, have you tried turning the heat off during the winter to see how cold the house gets?

Doheny
02-06-2013, 10:57 AM
I was in the same boat as you. So I bought a Mr. Heater Portable Buddy, conversion hose, filter and extra propane tanks. They're safe for indoor use and everything can be had for @ $100 (not including propane).

Oh and good luck with the twins :) My boys just turned 2. Nothing like getting the 2 for 1 special.

Those look pretty interesting. I'm curious how something using propane can be approved for indoor use.

Do they throw-out the heat pretty well?

ireload
02-06-2013, 11:40 AM
I have propane, wood, and wool blanket are my primary three to keep warm. I also have fleece blanket since my wife gets super itchy with wool due to her sensitive skin.

Saym14
02-06-2013, 11:48 AM
its Pasadena? It rarely gets cold enough that thick clothes ( wool is good) and some activity wont solve.

at 38 degrees for a couple hours no one is going to freeze to death.

olhunter
02-06-2013, 12:40 PM
its Pasadena? It rarely gets cold enough that thick clothes ( wool is good) and some activity wont solve.
at 38 degrees for a couple hours no one is going to freeze to death.

This.

You're not in Minnesota or North Dakota.

Keep their feet, hands and heads warm with clothing, stay dry and out of the wind and they'll be fine.

stitch_paradox
02-07-2013, 5:13 AM
Like what the lat two posters said. You live in Socal, your cold here is warm in other states, and they manage to get by even with their harsh winters. For me I like to go back to basics.
1. If you have a fire place, stock up with wood.
2. For clothing, layer up. If your body doesn't tolerate wool very well, there are synthetic warmers out there. Make sure head, hands, and feet are warm. Use wool socks. I used mine for almost 5 days in rain and cold and it has excellent heat retention and it didn't stink.
3. For a warmer bed time, choose blankets that your body will tolerate well. While wool is great, it may be itchy for others. I Personally like the "wooly mamoth" blanket. TAD gear use to sell them but they are expensive as hell. I found one in a local swapmeet only with floral designs, but I can live with that. If you want something different and toasty, try the old 4 season military sleeping system. It kept me warm and toasty in 05 degree weather, what more inside a house?
4. I try to stay away from electrical or chemical heaters. They can be fire hazzard. Since you have infants, you can try this to heat up their room. Buy one of those steam vaporizers from your local pharmacy stores. Put a little salt in the water to make more steam. Not only its a safe way to heat an area but a healthy way as well.

cannon
02-07-2013, 6:42 AM
its Pasadena? It rarely gets cold enough that thick clothes ( wool is good) and some activity wont solve.

at 38 degrees for a couple hours no one is going to freeze to death.

^^ This ^^

Also since you have a fireplace get a heat-o-rater which helps your fireplace be more efficient and don't forget you can always group the family in the room with the heat source and seal it off to contain that heat.

Couple the above with warm clothes and down comforters or sleeping bags and you and your family should be nice and roasty toasty for the cold times.

TheChief
02-07-2013, 8:30 AM
Also since you have a fireplace get a heat-o-rater which helps your fireplace be more efficient...

Hello Cannon,

Can you provide any links to a "heat-o-rater" so we can understand what you are talking about.

I have never heard that term before and have had fireplaces in every house I have lived in. I am wondering if I am missing out on something.