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Blacklist231
01-09-2013, 11:03 AM
I've been searching trying to figure out the best way to treat pool water, or any water for that fact to make sure it's safe for drinking. looking to buy test kits / whatever chemicals etc to treat the water.

any links to some good test kits? and treatment tablets etc etc?

thanks

mej16489
01-09-2013, 11:28 AM
Filter to remove contaminants, boil for pathogens, drink.

I would also recommend some form of plan to reduce water evaporation. Some form of 'liquid pool cover' at a minimum.

Blacklist231
01-09-2013, 11:39 AM
trying to find a way to treat the water without boiling... such as bleach / chlorine etc, then test for drinkability.

TheChief
01-09-2013, 12:17 PM
I have also looked. No one seems to address all the rather deadly chemicles that are in most pools. While a gulp or two wont hurt, using it for your drinking water source is a different matter.

burr2of4
01-09-2013, 12:22 PM
distill it. a still is pretty easy to make.

TheChief
01-09-2013, 12:26 PM
distill it. a still is pretty easy to make.

Yup...if you got fire and the know how you can use your pots and pans to make stills.

Aldemar
01-09-2013, 12:34 PM
I've got one of these:

http://www.katadyn.com/en/katadyn-products/products/katadynshopconnect/katadyn-wasserfilter-endurance-series-produkte/katadyn-drip-gravidyn/

The carbon in the filters keep any chlorine taste to a minimum. As far as preventing evaporation, I've done some tests without a cover, with a solar cover and with a plastic tarp. The least amount of evaporation seems to be with the tarp: I suppose the solar cover heats the water too much and actually promotes evaporation.

paul0660
01-09-2013, 12:37 PM
Depends on the pool. Also, most cases of the squirts are not life threatening.

rsrocket1
01-09-2013, 12:51 PM
Don't you know how to make a solar still? All you need is a plastic sheet, a bucket to catch the purified water and a rock.

I guess Boy Scouts does pay off a little.

ElDub1950
01-09-2013, 1:14 PM
The tarp cover for evaporation, above, combined with the boy scout enginuity for a solar still, above, would seem to solve both problems.

Depending on the weather of course, a tarp big enough to cover a pool should make a solar still big enough to sustain a couple of people.

Librarian
01-09-2013, 2:28 PM
Looks like the standard sand/charcoal biofilter may be an answer - http://www.ehow.com/how_10032556_convert-pool-water-drinking-water.html

Making your own activated charcoal seems out of the question - http://www.buyactivatedcharcoal.com/how_to_make_activated_charcoal f the DIY is thinking ahead to some Survival scenario, then we can tell you from very real firsthand experience; you are not going to have access to any of the chemicals suggested above, and, more importantly, the effectiveness of plain charcoal will compare favorably with any activated charcoal in whatever emergency should come your way, as long as the final powder is sterile. They link to an article that says Making Charcoal Powder
Okay, time to teach someone how to make their own charcoal and demonstrate it. Hope, from Ghana, was more than willing, as Community Development was her main study. I purchased a 50 lb sack of charcoal - it was a mixture of different hardwoods including Eucalyptus and Guava. Hope selected out the hardest pieces, washed away the most obvious dirt, then washed again with boiling water to sterilize them. After being allowed to dry sufficiently in the sun, she then set to pounding it in a traditional hollowed out log with a five foot pole rounded on one end. After pounding, the mixture was first sifted through a coarse mesh flour sifter, and then a very fine mesh flour sifter. The large pieces were all returned to the urn to be pounded again, and the process repeated over and over. Four hours of this tedious and hard work produced five gallons of fine sifted charcoal powder. At this point it would suit me better to see the powder laid on metal trays and heated again to sterilize the powder, allowed to thoroughly dry, and then stored in sterilized glass jars. Sanitation can never be over emphasized, whether in a primitive village or a modern cosmopolitan city.

Or, as the charcoal seller suggests, you can buy some ...

KevinB
01-09-2013, 3:28 PM
Most pools are treated with chlorine the same thing they treat your water with.

I would drink the water out of my pool or hot tub.

jbj
01-09-2013, 4:19 PM
Pool water has vastly higher concentrations of chlorine than tap water. Highly recommend distilling or purifying to safe drinking levels (google for info). Renal failure can't be fun.

frankm
01-09-2013, 4:23 PM
You have to distill it, can't filter it enough.

Librarian
01-09-2013, 4:32 PM
Pool water has vastly higher concentrations of chlorine than tap water. Highly recommend distilling or purifying to safe drinking levels (google for info). Renal failure can't be fun.

For a while - see http://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=1599418&postcount=7
Chlorine in a pool or spa can get consumed in many different ways, but most have in common converting chlorine in an oxidation state of +1 into chloride ion in an oxidation state of -1. In an outdoor pool exposed to sunlight and with low bather load such as a private (homeowner) swimming pool, the greatest loss is due to the breakdown of chlorine from UV in sunlight: Pools should be (http://www.waterandhealth.org/newsletter/new/summer_2004/public_health.html) "Free chlorine, ppm 2.0 - 4.0 ppm";

"The proposed federal drinking water standard for chlorine is 4 parts per million (ppm)." http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/eh/chemfs/fs/chlorine.htm

It's still better to charcoal-filter pool water - more stuff than just the chlorine.

Maltese Falcon
01-09-2013, 4:35 PM
Looks like the standard sand/charcoal biofilter may be an answer - http://www.ehow.com/how_10032556_convert-pool-water-drinking-water.html

Making your own activated charcoal seems out of the question - http://www.buyactivatedcharcoal.com/how_to_make_activated_charcoal

Has anyone done this before?

What kind of sand? Like washed playground sand?

I checked out the Activated Charcoal web link, Seems like they have different mesh sizes available. The smaller the better?

.

joe_gman
01-09-2013, 4:37 PM
Chlorine dissipates from water fairly quickly. Leaving pool water in a 5 gallon bucket for a few hours will allow the chlorine to dissipate to easily safe drinking levels. If worst comes to worst, buy yourself a MSR water filter. Great thing to keep around.

BLC
01-09-2013, 4:41 PM
Does all this apply to hot tubs as well?

woods
01-09-2013, 4:48 PM
Pool water is not a good option. Distilling is the only method I trust because of many factors and we are not just talking about the chlorine. Just know that the fire department will be stealing it from you if there is a disaster and is hard to use . This should not be your primary or secondary water storage but don't completely discount it. I personally have 2 50 gallon barrels they are 10.99 new at the feed store and a supply store.

Get a 12$ bung wrench and kit so you can use the 2 holes they have on the top.

My uncle put a pneumatic fitting and air pump on one to pump the water out and it worked quite nice. the other hole had a straw that didn't quite go to the bottom so debris could settle and you would not drink them.

Maltese Falcon
01-09-2013, 4:54 PM
Does all this apply to hot tubs as well?

Probably more so as the warmer water is better for bacteria growth.

.

Backcountry
01-09-2013, 5:04 PM
Pool water has vastly higher concentrations of chlorine than tap water. Highly recommend distilling or purifying to safe drinking levels (google for info). Renal failure can't be fun.

Wrong.

daveinwoodland
01-09-2013, 5:16 PM
This may answer some questions:

http://www.disasterstuff.com/store/pc/Is-Pool-Water-Safe-to-Drink-d23.htm

mej16489
01-09-2013, 5:30 PM
Filter to remove contaminants, boil for pathogens, drink.

I would also recommend some form of plan to reduce water evaporation. Some form of 'liquid pool cover' at a minimum.

I've had lab tests run on several occasions using my method from above...it beats my water district faucet water every time. In fact, the unboiled water test results are identical to boiled. If fuel became scarce I wouldn't have a problem using it unboiled.

A properly chlorinated pool has roughly the same ppm of free chlorine as municipal water is allowed to have.

A couple years ago I let the pool go completely swampy because I was going to drain and refinish it anyway - the end results were the same as from a 'clean' pool.

My biggest concern about using the pool as 15k gallons of water storage is evaporation - I can easily lose about 100 gallons a day in the peak of the summer. I keep a stockpile of 'liquid pool cover' on hand which can reduce peak evaporation down to about 1/10th - but only if the water isn't disturbed much (wind, earthquake, etc)

Everyone should also keep in mind that I've seen pools lose upwards of 10k gallons in an earthquake simply from sloshing...

The filters I use are:
http://www.katadyn.com/en/katadyn-products/products/katadynshopconnect/katadyn-wasserfilter-endurance-series-produkte/katadyn-pocket/
http://www.katadyn.com/en/katadyn-products/products/katadynshopconnect/katadyn-wasserfilter-endurance-series-produkte/katadyn-expedition/

Librarian
01-09-2013, 6:12 PM
Has anyone done this before?

What kind of sand? Like washed playground sand?

I checked out the Activated Charcoal web link, Seems like they have different mesh sizes available. The smaller the better?

.

Simple tech - http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-purify-your-water/

www.aqsolutions.org/resources/DIY.pdf

http://www.squidoo.com/HomemadeCharcoalWaterFilter

Slightly different tech:

http://www.dowsers.org/service-to-humanity/appropriate-technology/slow-sand-bio-filters

http://www.cdc.gov/safewater/sand-filtration.html

Sunday
01-09-2013, 7:12 PM
Lots of bad advice!!!

Sunday
01-09-2013, 7:13 PM
Lots of bad advice!!!

Sunday
01-09-2013, 7:13 PM
Filter to remove contaminants, boil for pathogens, drink.

I would also recommend some form of plan to reduce water evaporation. Some form of 'liquid pool cover' at a minimum.pools should be clorinated!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sunday
01-09-2013, 7:15 PM
I've been searching trying to figure out the best way to treat pool water, or any water for that fact to make sure it's safe for drinking. looking to buy test kits / whatever chemicals etc to treat the water.

any links to some good test kits? and treatment tablets etc etc?

thanks A cared for pool water is pretty clean. My 14 year old dog only drank pool water 99% of his life.

Socalman
01-09-2013, 8:41 PM
The main use of pool water, actually a spa for us, would be for cleaning, Washing hands, dishes, using to flush toilets. Since we are on a closed septic system, I do not have to rely the city water mains to replenish the tanks.

Socalman
01-09-2013, 8:41 PM
The main use of pool water, actually a spa for us, would be for cleaning, Washing hands, dishes, using to flush toilets. Since we are on a closed septic system, I do not have to rely the city water mains to replenish the tanks.

jbj
01-10-2013, 1:28 AM
For a while - see http://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=1599418&postcount=7
Pools should be (http://www.waterandhealth.org/newsletter/new/summer_2004/public_health.html) "Free chlorine, ppm 2.0 - 4.0 ppm";

"The proposed federal drinking water standard for chlorine is 4 parts per million (ppm)." http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/eh/chemfs/fs/chlorine.htm

It's still better to charcoal-filter pool water - more stuff than just the chlorine.

I stand corrected. I was thinking about shocked pools chlorine values. Thanks for the links. (Still wouldn't drink straight out of it though)

DannyInSoCal
01-10-2013, 1:33 AM
I'm all set - 3500 gallons of salt water in my pool....

:43:

Saym14
01-10-2013, 7:50 AM
solar - google it - place water in PTE drinking water bottles ( like the nestles water comesin). place in sun for 8 hours. pathogens killed or nuetralized.

Decoligny
01-10-2013, 10:32 AM
Does all this apply to hot tubs as well?

Most spas use Bromide as a disinfectant, not Chlorine.

In the amounts used in a spa, the Bromide levels might be high enough to cause Bromide Toxicity if ingested.

If you plan on using a spa as an emergency drinking water supply, I suggest you completely empty the spa, clean the Bromide out of it thoroughly by filling it with clean water and running it up to temp, and then emptying and refilling it again. Once filled with clean water, change to using Chlorine.

Decoligny
01-10-2013, 10:37 AM
solar - google it - place water in PTE drinking water bottles ( like the nestles water comesin). place in sun for 8 hours. pathogens killed or nuetralized.

Can boil the water with only sunlight if you have a solar oven. Easy to make with a couple of carboard boxes, a piece of plexiglass, and a can of black spray paint.

BLC
01-10-2013, 10:43 AM
Most spas use Bromide as a disinfectant, not Chlorine.

In the amounts used in a spa, the Bromide levels might be high enough to cause Bromide Toxicity if ingested.

If you plan on using a spa as an emergency drinking water supply, I suggest you completely empty the spa, clean the Bromide out of it thoroughly by filling it with clean water and running it up to temp, and then emptying and refilling it again. Once filled with clean water, change to using Chlorine.

I would have to get awful thirsty to drink it, regardless of how its been treated!

mej16489
01-10-2013, 11:35 AM
lol - massive PMs on my two posts in this thread....

I'm not advocating directly drinking pool water!!!!!

Californio
01-10-2013, 1:18 PM
I would have to get awful thirsty to drink it, regardless of how its been treated!

My Spa is for sanitation only which leaves my stored water for everything else.

I am not sure of the ratio but the you need a gallon of water per person per day includes sanitation.

mudbud
01-10-2013, 10:59 PM
Depending on the owner of the pool most are just getting their chemicals from wal mart. ie shock it liquid and dry chlorine.

There has been alot of talk about this in the water industry.

Chemicals like dichlor and trichor which help maintain the free and total cl2 in your pool. While these are consider "safe" for pool standards they are currently investigating there effects on human consumption and establish limits to pool use, as well as drinking water in "public" pools and water systems.



depening on what and how much "junk" is is your pool the dpd and Thm's could be high.

But as stated private pools are less that 4ppm

Most public drink water maintains a cl2 residual of 2ppm or less

Where i work we like to maintain a system residual of around .45 to .87 to eliminate the cl2 smells and tastes.

If all you have is your pool wate left to drink. check the cl2 level with a dpd test.

You wont have "renal" failure at the cl2 levels listed above.

A list of chemicals in your pool and what they do

http://www.poolcalculator.com/chemistry.html:D

xrMike
01-11-2013, 9:17 PM
I have also looked. No one seems to address all the rather deadly chemicles that are in most pools. While a gulp or two wont hurt, using it for your drinking water source is a different matter.

Pool water has vastly higher concentrations of chlorine than tap water. Highly recommend distilling or purifying to safe drinking levels (google for info). Renal failure can't be fun.

A cared for pool water is pretty clean. My 14 year old dog only drank pool water 99% of his life.

My 16 year-old corgi mix has been drinking nothing but pool water for the last 13 years, and he's still doing fine. I think I can rely on it in a pinch.

Saym14
01-11-2013, 9:31 PM
I would rather drink filtered purified pool water in SHTF and die of cancer in 30 years than die of thirst in 4 days.

Saym14
01-11-2013, 9:48 PM
Can boil the water with only sunlight if you have a solar oven. Easy to make with a couple of carboard boxes, a piece of plexiglass, and a can of black spray paint.

dont even need to boil. we took green lake water. after 8 hours in the sun in bottles, all bacteria was killed or nuetralized.

tcd511
01-12-2013, 7:14 AM
Pool water has vastly higher concentrations of chlorine than tap water. Highly recommend distilling or purifying to safe drinking levels (google for info). Renal failure can't be fun.

Really...get your self a pool chemical test set and test your drinking water. We did this just for fun last year and was shocked to see the chlorine level of the faucet water register the same as the pools. We the put a filter containing charcoal on the faucet and re-tested. What a difference that filter made. I had no idea drinking water contained that much chlorine.

77bawls
01-12-2013, 2:29 PM
Really...get your self a pool chemical test set and test your drinking water. We did this just for fun last year and was shocked to see the chlorine level of the faucet water register the same as the pools. We the put a filter containing charcoal on the faucet and re-tested. What a difference that filter made. I had no idea drinking water contained that much chlorine.

It depends if you just shocked your pool or not. UV dissipates chlorine so you could put it in a bottle for a day with the top open and you would be fine. Or stop adding chlorine to the pool and in a few days all of it would be gone.

frankh7
01-12-2013, 3:03 PM
I picked up a gravy fed water filter called AquaPail. The model I got for $150.00 claims to filter 1000 gals of all harmful contaminants. I was told the filter system is a must have for pool owners bugging in.

frankh7
01-12-2013, 3:07 PM
I picked up a gravy fed water filter called AquaPail. The model I got for $150.00 claims to filter 1000 gals of all harmful contaminants. I was told the filter system is a must have for pool owners bugging in.

xrMike
01-12-2013, 5:57 PM
I would never drink pool water without either boiling first or filtering through one of those ceramic-type filters (like the Katadyns) that go down to 1 or 2 microns, to remove bacteria and pathogens.

Maintenance levels of chlorine are not an issue in a PROPERLY MAINTAINED pool, like somebody said above. 2- to 4ppm is not going to hurt you and is about what comes out of your tap. If you just SHOCKED the pool with chlorine, then yeah, I wouldn't treat/drink that without waiting a couple/few days for the chlorine to dissipate.

The only other concern I have with pool water is the mineral content (hardness). For example, unless I cover my pool in the summer, I lose about an inch of water a week to evaporation. That means I have to add a couple inches of water every couple of weeks in the summer.

When water evaporates from a pool, that's really no differerent from a distillation. In other words, all of the minerals that were originally IN the water that evaporated are left behind, in the remaining pool water. Over time, because you have to keep adding new water to the pool, your pool water becomes increasingly hard, or laden with minerals (calcium? lime? not sure what else... ).

The tap water here is really hard to begin with, so the pool loads up with minerals to the point where every year I have to empty about half my pool (which is 12.5K gallons full) and refill it with fresh water. Otherwise scale starts building up on the gunnite and tile at the water line.

I maintain mine fairly well. I just wonder if the super-high mineral content in a poorly-maintained pool would be bad for people if they relied on it for drinking for a long period.

I don't know.

MotoriousRacing
01-12-2013, 6:10 PM
dont even need to boil. we took green lake water. after 8 hours in the sun in bottles, all bacteria was killed or nuetralized.

How were you sure of this?

john67elco
01-13-2013, 12:26 AM
I'm also closed septic and have submersible pump that can pump pool water into house and light up my facets and toilets. All I need is a 12v batter or my gen to run. I need to test it out. My pool is like 5 foot from house I'm sure it will work pumping it straight into the garden hose spickit.

Saym14
01-13-2013, 12:57 AM
How were you sure of this?

bacteria test kits. my teenager ( and me) did a science project)

If I had to drink mine ( I do all my ow pool cleaning and treatment. I would flter it it, boil it ( if I had propane left) and then solar treeat it. but if I had no other choice I would solar treat it onlt and drink it.

I have 6 to 8 months of bottled water for the family - the 25,000 gallon pool is just a bonus.

tommyfly
01-13-2013, 1:32 AM
i work at a public swimming pool. The only chemicals we put in it are

Chlorine, which will dissipate by the end of the day if the pumps fails. We try to keep levels between 1-5 ppm

Acid, which is used to control the PH levels

and Sodium bi-carbonate for alkalinity. Sodium bi-carbonate is just a fancy work for baking soda. I actually saw Sodium bi-carb as a listed ingredient on a bottle of water once.

mej16489
01-13-2013, 9:37 AM
The only other concern I have with pool water is the mineral content (hardness). For example, unless I cover my pool in the summer, I lose about an inch of water a week to evaporation. That means I have to add a couple inches of water every couple of weeks in the summer.

When water evaporates from a pool, that's really no differerent from a distillation. In other words, all of the minerals that were originally IN the water that evaporated are left behind, in the remaining pool water. Over time, because you have to keep adding new water to the pool, your pool water becomes increasingly hard, or laden with minerals (calcium? lime? not sure what else... ).

The tap water here is really hard to begin with, so the pool loads up with minerals to the point where every year I have to empty about half my pool (which is 12.5K gallons full) and refill it with fresh water. Otherwise scale starts building up on the gunnite and tile at the water line.


1 gallon of muriatic acid poured directly over the deepest part of the pool. Leave the water undisturbed for a few hours before normal filtration (and of course no swimming) Oddly enough this method also has essentially no effect on the overall pH of the water.

I filter using DE, I don't know if it works for other filtration methods. I mention it because it seems like I remember reading that it doesn't work with salt-water chlorination/sand filtration combination.

I do this about every six weeks from late spring through late summer. This has eliminated 99.9% of my water hardness issues; I too used to semi-drain/fill. Hard water makes for a terrible swimming experience, it makes your skin incredibly dry and itchy.