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View Full Version : What is the difference between 1994 gun ban and current california laws


Newbshooter
01-09-2013, 7:15 AM
everything Ive been reading about future gun legislation is that its going to be similiar to the 1994 gun ban. California seems to currently have alot of these restrictions already in place. How would 1994 law in reimplemented affect current california guns sales, wouldn't AR15s still be available just not with bayonet mounts. Im new to gun ownership so don't understand all the current concerns california gun owners are having.

LibertyDeath
01-09-2013, 7:18 AM
Well, the biggest difference, the 1994 ban expired.

wecf
01-09-2013, 8:11 AM
the new ban would ban rifles that have one disqualifying feature insted of 2, meaning if you have a pistol grip it's a AW.

RileyBean
01-09-2013, 8:15 AM
'94 you could not have pistol grip with flash hider, lug, or coll. stock - so the "post ban" AR rifles came with a comp instead, no lug, and an A2 stock.

Not really a big difference (certainly shoots the same), and I'd take that set up without a magazine lock over the current CA rifles any day.

[Edit: I was out of state at the time, so I'm only speaking of the '94 federal restrictions]

ptoguy2002
01-09-2013, 8:55 AM
California AWB is detachable mag + 1 evil feature. Expired fed AWB was detachable mag + 2 evil features. So basically, under the expired federal law, you could still have an AR or AK with detachable mag and a pistol grip, you just couldn't have any other evil features.
Pre-ban could also be transferred, so you could still buy one (used) with all the evil features. They didn't have to be registered either.

Mitch
01-09-2013, 9:30 AM
California AWB is detachable mag + 1 evil feature. Expired fed AWB was detachable mag + 2 evil features. So basically, under the expired federal law, you could still have an AR or AK with detachable mag and a pistol grip, you just couldn't have any other evil features.
Pre-ban could also be transferred, so you could still buy one (used) with all the evil features. They didn't have to be registered either.

The 1994 ban in fact was not much of a ban, because of the two evil features requirement. You were free to buy any AR-15 you wanted, as long as it didn't have a flash hider, bayonet lug or collapsing stock (and millions of folks did). Not only did the 1994 law not put much of a dent in AR-15 sales, it actually drew renewed attention to the platform and, in my opinion, accounts in no small part for the current popularity of the AR-15.

California's law is far more draconian, because of the single evil feature requirement, as opposed to two. Normally configured AR-15s are essentially banned here, since a pistol grip is an evil feature. The only reason we get away with buying AR-15s is because we render them "fixed magazine" (or more accurately, "non detachable magazine"), so they no longer fall under the "assault weapon" definition. This is why evil features like collapsing stocks and flash hiders are okay on bullet button rifles, because they don't have detachable magazine and so are not subject to the other aspects of the ban.

The bullet button only works in California because of the wording of a regulation clarifying whether or not an SKS magazine is detachable or not (combined with DoJ sloth once the bullet button movement started; there were things they could have done to get in front of it, but they dithered, and now it's too late). Without this crucial regulatory piece, a national one-evil-feature prohibition would essentially ban AR-15s (except with Monsterman grips, etc).

Luckily, I think the chances of this occurring are pretty slim.

morfeeis
01-09-2013, 9:45 AM
California AWB is detachable mag + 1 evil feature. Expired fed AWB was detachable mag + 2 evil features. So basically, under the expired federal law, you could still have an AR or AK with detachable mag and a pistol grip, you just couldn't have any other evil features.
Pre-ban could also be transferred, so you could still buy one (used) with all the evil features. They didn't have to be registered either.
Sounds like if it did pass the hammer head grip would see a huge increase in sales.....

pMcW
01-09-2013, 9:49 AM
Also, under the '94 ban you could still buy, sell, and use existing >10 round magazines that were manufactured before the ban.