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View Full Version : How Big Should A B.O.B Be.


Gun_Owner_901
12-31-2012, 7:50 PM
So I was wondering If there is like a standard size that a B.O.B should be, I have 2 of the Molle II Large Assault Packs that are USGI here is a link to the one I am talking about.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5Jl4xkh3KU

Now there are 2 packs that I am thinking about getting and I don't really know which way to go, the first one I am thinking about getting is the USMC Digital Marpat Ilbe Arcteryx Main Pack which looks almost to big but looks extremely comfortable here is a link to that one.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006NSS0Q4/sr=8-3/qid=1357010680/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&qid=1357010680&seller=&sr=8-3

The 2nd Pack I am considering is the 5.11 72 Rush Pack and here is a link to that one.

http://www.511tactical.com/All-Products/Bags-Backpacks/Backpacks/RUSH-72-Backpack.html

Can a B.O.B itself be too big, Let me know what you guys think, and if any of you have ether of these packs please let me know how you like them, also any suggestions will be gladly taken. Thank You.

TheChief
12-31-2012, 11:10 PM
It depends on your ability, plan, purpose, equipment, etc. It is unique to each person as everyone wants to carry different items.

What are you intending this BOB for? Running out of a burning house and need a spare set of clothes, blanket, keys and docs, or evacuating your home from a hurricane or the invading horde. It all depends.

In general, you tend to pack to much the first ten or fifteen times you pack and there is a learning curve.

For me, I use the BOB as a general purpose just in case bag and am running with the 5.11 Covrt 18 http://www.amazon.com/5-11-ACKAM117-Covrt18-Backpack/dp/B005AG5N9C

Brien
12-31-2012, 11:21 PM
Although a big range, I would suspect most weight between 20-40 lbs. Mine weights 28 lbs. without ammo and I carry most of our supplies. My wife's BOB has mainly our first aid supplies and freeze dried foods and weights 25 lbs.

stitch_paradox
12-31-2012, 11:29 PM
I agree with what Chief said. My advice is to hike 5 miles with your B.O.B and from there you will see if you are carrying too much or not.

Gun_Owner_901
12-31-2012, 11:38 PM
Well I live in the Yuba City area which is considered a flood zone so It would mainly be for carry the stuff I would need if I had to hike out to Sutter, that being said I also want to carry stuff I would need to survive any type of situation whatever that be.

stitch_paradox
12-31-2012, 11:46 PM
Once you actually start hiking and "camping out" with your BOB, you'd start trimming down the stuff that you carry. You'll be surprised on how much gear that you can actually live with out. Have you tried hiking and using your gears?

Gun_Owner_901
01-01-2013, 12:08 AM
I have gone camping all my life so I more or less know what I need to get by, My main worry is carrying enough ammo or forgetting something so that if something happens where I need to live in the wild for an extend amount of time I would have plenty of supplies.

wheels
01-01-2013, 12:34 AM
I've got the RUSH 72 and the Moab 10. The Rush 72 stays in the Van and the Moab is a EDC depending on what I am doing. The TIER system let's me mate the Moab on the rear of the Rush 72. I need do a long hike to really wring it out but it's done a couple short tests just fine.

A BOB really needs to be specific to your area.

Gun_Owner_901
01-01-2013, 12:45 AM
@ wheels, I like those, do you have a site you would recommend.

johnny1290
01-01-2013, 2:51 AM
I have a molle 2 pack and one of htose conceal carry pistol case bags that goes over your shoulder.

both weigh about 45 pounds combined.

It's too much, to be honest. That's without a gun and with 50 rds of 9mm and some .22. Anyway the idea was the shoulder bag for a get home bag and the mollle for an extended 3 day bag. 3 days of misery, anyway LOL

I have a big Molle ruck but who am I kidding, how far can I possibly hump that thing.

Onetyme
01-01-2013, 8:46 AM
I have a UM21 Patrol Pack as my BOB. The larger main pack is setup as an INCH bag. The BOB weights 40 lbs. I hike about 4 miles every other weekend with it & that's a comfortable weight for me. I also jump on a treadmill from time to time.

What I have not done is hiked with the mesh gear on as well. Which I need to do. If you will carry more weight from your web gear, weapons & ammo consider how that will integrate into your BOB setup. UM21 is a complete system for you gear. Back pack, main pack, web gear as well as bullet proof vest. It's worth looking into.

As for the gear, I pack food & water plus the ability to get more food & purify more water as well as extra ammo. I also have layers of clothing & other items I feel are important for me. Looking to replace the tent with a Clark Hammock soon.

wheels
01-01-2013, 10:48 AM
@ wheels, I like those, do you have a site you would recommend.

Here's what I got from Optics Planet -

Ordered: 1 Shipped: 1
T5-PP-58602-328 5.11 Tactical Rush 72 Backpack, Sandstone 58602-328 $149.99
Ordered: 1 Shipped: 1
T5-BG-FACECB-56964-328 5.11 Tactical Rush Moab 10, Sandstone 56964-328 $89.99
Ordered: 1 Shipped: 1
T5-BG-RTS-56957-328 5.11 Tactical RUSH 4-Piece Tier Strap System, Sandstone 56957-328 $14.99

The only gotcha for me was the optics planet web site showed the tier strap system as a recommended accessory for the Moab 10 - when it actually comes with the Moab 10. The 5.11 site states that more clearly. But I've got a spare set of straps that I'm going to use somehow. :)

No tax & free shipping...

I have a lot of backpacks, these are pretty well suited to BOB/GHB/INCH use.

ElvenSoul
01-01-2013, 8:41 PM
Ummm we have a whole thread http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=147834

Stan08
01-03-2013, 12:11 PM
Just my .02; the 72 hour packs are good spring/summer weight packs for here in SoCal where you do not need too many warming layers or a sleeping bag.

However comma, they are limited in space and will fill up quick. Compact yes, but that means that you you'll need to stuff all of your contents in there and should you need to pull anything out you have to work the puzzle of pulling it out and putting the other stuff back in.

IMHO, you want to go bigger for your pack so that you don't need to fight it like above. Then you close it up and cinch it tight as necessary. A sleep system and warming layers are non-negotiable to me. You just don't know how long you'll be out. Travel light freeze at night. Also with a 72 hr bag you can't carry as much food and water. If you go with a bigger pack you can always carry less but with a smaller pack you can't necessarily carry more.

ElvenSoul
01-04-2013, 3:55 PM
If you ever have to pickup that 50lb pack and walk uphill you might want to read this

http://www.ultimate-ultralight-backpacking.com/

A few years ago I went to a survival weekend and I could not believe some of the gear people brought. There was one guy with a large Alice thing must of weight 120lbs. Part of the weekend was to break camp and hike to a new location 5 miles away. I was the only one not exhausted at the end. My pack weight was 12lbs.

With 50lb pack average person can go 5 to 8 miles in a day

25lb pack 10 to 14 miles

10lb and under some people can do 30 miles a day.

Stan08
02-03-2013, 9:38 AM
If you ever have to pickup that 50lb pack and walk uphill you might want to read this

http://www.ultimate-ultralight-backpacking.com/

A few years ago I went to a survival weekend and I could not believe some of the gear people brought. There was one guy with a large Alice thing must of weight 120lbs. Part of the weekend was to break camp and hike to a new location 5 miles away. I was the only one not exhausted at the end. My pack weight was 12lbs.

With 50lb pack average person can go 5 to 8 miles in a day

25lb pack 10 to 14 miles

10lb and under some people can do 30 miles a day.


You would be correct under the premise that you don't need warming layers, a sleeping bag, more than three days food, streams and rivers to get water etc.

Spring and Summer in SoCal you can probably make due on a 12 pound pack; pending survival skills, duration, food, water, etc.

Someone in say North, North/Eastern Cal in Winter/early Spring with a 12 pound pack will probably die.

Your pack itself is just a bag, the contents inside are driven by your situation, mission, enemy, terrain, weather, etc. etc.

I say go with a larger volume pack, it doesn't mean you have to fill it to the gills though.

Gabriel80
02-03-2013, 10:01 AM
The first pack looks good, with a decent price, but check the mixed reviews on amazon. The second pack looks pretty expensive for what you get.

IMHO, i think you're better off getting a true backpackers pack, around 65liters (or 4000 cubic inches) from a store like R.E.I.. Brands I would research are Osprey and Gregory. I'm personally not sold on all the military camo stuff....

Those huge backpackers packs weigh around 4 pounds, have internal aluminum frames and are meant to tote around your entire camp rig (shelter, food, clothing systems, tools, etc.

Personally I own the OSPREY ATMOS 65, and it's amazing, yet pricey, but also have a lifetime warranty, built for a water bladder and all the bells and whistles.

I also have a separate "bug out duffel bag" that I got at a Military Surplus store for like $20. It's pretty huge and would not lug it around, but I could throw it in the car if need be and it holds tools like a bolt cutter, pry bar, etc etc, heavy bulky things I wouldn't hump around in a backpack....

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 11:25 AM
Just a heads on the ILBE, the black padding is 1st gen. Go with the tan backing for gen2.

http://www.amazon.com/ILBE-Main-Pack-Generation-Assault/dp/B009ES1OK4/ref=pd_sbs_misc_1

To be honest, I love the idea of the ILBE. It has the day pack for a light 72 hour BOB bag. Use the Main pack for say a week or 2 BOB. Attach the main, assault, hydration systems and you have an INCH bag. Being a HAM, that radio pouch on the main pack is a plus. :)

If only it wasn't marpat. lol

Onetyme
02-03-2013, 11:34 AM
Just a heads on the ILBE, the black padding is 1st gen. Go with the tan backing for gen2.

http://www.amazon.com/ILBE-Main-Pack-Generation-Assault/dp/B009ES1OK4/ref=pd_sbs_misc_1

To be honest, I love the idea of the ILBE. It has the day pack for a light 72 hour BOB bag. Use the Main pack for say a week or 2 BOB. Attach the main, assault, hydration systems and you have an INCH bag. Being a HAM, that radio pouch on the main pack is a plus. :)

If only it wasn't marpat. lol

That's pretty high. eBay has them for much cheaper.

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 11:42 AM
Really was just wanting to show the OP the tan one. Not to actually buy it. Heck $150 for a 1st gen is crazy stupid.

Those in my link are also brand new. Plus I hate ebay.


For me, I can just ask some Marines on 29 and could probably have the whole setup for about $100-$150.

kaligaran
02-03-2013, 8:41 PM
IMO it depends on what you want your BoB to be. The definition of it.

A BoB IMO is usually a bag to get you to your bug out location. Some people use a BoB as an INCH bag or even a GHB.

What's most important is to pack up your bag and take a LONG hike with it. I mean LONG. See what you can do. Pay attention to how fast you move and how tired/sore you are the next day. Your body will tell you what's too much.

I did 5 mile (mostly uphill) on an overnight camping trip last summer with a 32# pack. I'm only 5'5" and 125 so needless to say, I was MISERABLE by mile 3. So in my current shape, I can't do that much weight. Valuable lesson learned.

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 9:02 PM
IMO it depends on what you want your BoB to be. The definition of it.

A BoB IMO is usually a bag to get you to your bug out location. Some people use a BoB as an INCH bag or even a GHB.



A BOB is a BOB or 72 hr bag.

A INCH bag is packed way differently than a 72 hour bag.

A GHB is packed way differently than a BOB.

If you want me to expand on my thoughts, let me know.

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 9:05 PM
IMO it depends on what you want your BoB to be. The definition of it.

A BoB IMO is usually a bag to get you to your bug out location.


Negative, that is a INCH bag.

kaligaran
02-03-2013, 9:10 PM
Negative, that is a INCH bag.

LOL, this is my point exactly. Everyone has a different answer and/or definition of a BoB.

Indeed, an INCH is definitely packed WAY differently than a BoB.

Why is a BoB only 72 hours for example. Are you coming back within 72 hours? If so, why are you leaving in the first place?
From what I read on survival forums, most seem to define a BoB as the bag to get you to an already stocked BoL, thus the 72 hour or so guideline.

Whereas an INCH seems to be no stocked final location.

Again, there's a million definitions out there. None wrong or right. But to the OP, depends on YOUR definition for how big based on what you put in it.

Eldraque
02-03-2013, 9:20 PM
Bug out bags are Nice. Though all you need is your brain, three knives, and as many ways to make fire as possible.

Handgun on your hip, and a long gun in your hands never hurt either

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 9:28 PM
LOL, this is my point exactly. Everyone has a different answer and/or definition of a BoB.

Indeed, an INCH is definitely packed WAY differently than a BoB.

Why is a BoB only 72 hours for example. Are you coming back within 72 hours? If so, why are you leaving in the first place?
From what I read on survival forums, most seem to define a BoB as the bag to get you to an already stocked BoL, thus the 72 hour or so guideline.

Uhhh, because due to flood, fire or earthquake, LEO's usually issue a warning to leave your home in an emergency.

DavidR310
02-03-2013, 9:31 PM
...
From what I read on survival forums...

Welcome to California.

kaligaran
02-04-2013, 10:45 AM
Uhhh, because due to flood, fire or earthquake, LEO's usually issue a warning to leave your home in an emergency.

Sounds like your BoB is intended for regional/natural disasters where LEOs and other support are still around. This is what I meant by the different definitions, some make them with the expectation that there may not be LEOs around (civil unrest, zombies, EMP, etc). Some have a bug out location, some don't, etc.

Regardless, there's no right or wrong answer. I'm not trying to argue so not too sure why the sarcastic tone. Just that the OP may want to consider these things before taking mine or anybody's suggestions.

Welcome to California.

I don't even know what the point of this reply is.


Regardless, the main thing I'm sure we can all agree on is to NOT just pack a bag with a bunch of unused/untested gear and shove it in a closet and forget it. You should take hikes with it packed and use the gear to familiarize yourself with it. Camping is a fun way to use that cool gear. Learn what works and what doesn't, what's too heavy, make adjustments, rinse, repeat.

DavidR310
02-04-2013, 11:44 AM
Sounds like your BoB is intended for regional/natural disasters where LEOs and other support are still around. This is what I meant by the different definitions, some make them with the expectation that there may not be LEOs around (civil unrest, zombies, EMP, etc). Some have a bug out location, some don't, etc.

Regardless, there's no right or wrong answer. I'm not trying to argue so not too sure why the sarcastic tone. Just that the OP may want to consider these things before taking mine or anybody's suggestions.



I don't even know what the point of this reply is.


Regardless, the main thing I'm sure we can all agree on is to NOT just pack a bag with a bunch of unused/untested gear and shove it in a closet and forget it. You should take hikes with it packed and use the gear to familiarize yourself with it. Camping is a fun way to use that cool gear. Learn what works and what doesn't, what's too heavy, make adjustments, rinse, repeat.


Cuz you didn't have one too many Buds yesterday. I apologize if any of my remarks came off as rude or incomprehensible.

Decoligny
02-04-2013, 11:46 AM
Depending upon your bug out route, and your requirements, you might want to consider a bug out cart. Something like a game cart. Properly balanced a single person can move a significant amount of weight with minimal effort.

Two people make it a breeze.

http://gametote.com/images/cart-reviews/thediyhunter-single-wheel-elk-deer-cart.jpg

hultgrenks
02-11-2013, 11:12 PM
Lots of good info here... But what you will find out is; there is no bag that is perfect for every situation. What you have to do is define your worst case scenario and go from there.

My worst case scenario is being stuck at work as a first responder and if our system breaks down and I cannot drive home, I have to hike (31 miles by freeway, and between 31 and 36 for other routes). So, define your worst case scenario, and build a modular bag for this environment. I have.

1. 5.11 72 hour bag with most of my supplies (similar to contents needed for backpacking trip, minus tent and cooking equipment)
2. Load bearing harness and belt for lightweight and tactical movement (holster, ammo pouches, dump bag, canteen, first aid, knife, etc.).
3. Plate Carrier with ammo pouches, etc. if it is really bad.

This set-up should give me the clothes and supplies to last 4 days, the time I think it would take me to get home, if I have to evade and keep away from as much human contact as possible.

So find out what your specific scenario(s) is/are and build your bag(s) to meet your needs. (lightweight = faster movement and more terrain covered in less time).

9-12
02-13-2013, 8:48 AM
Having a BOB is only part of "bugging out". Just as important is knowhing where you're "bugging out" to. What you have at your bug out destination will dictate what you need in your BOB. It;s a lot easier to store survival supplies somewhere that you can reach in a day's walk, rahter than have to survive for who-knows-how long on whatever you have in your BOB. If you're bugging out with no destination or plan, you're only delaying the problem, not solving it.

9-12
02-13-2013, 8:56 AM
If you ever have to pickup that 50lb pack and walk uphill you might want to read this

http://www.ultimate-ultralight-backpacking.com/

A few years ago I went to a survival weekend and I could not believe some of the gear people brought. There was one guy with a large Alice thing must of weight 120lbs. Part of the weekend was to break camp and hike to a new location 5 miles away. I was the only one not exhausted at the end. My pack weight was 12lbs.

With 50lb pack average person can go 5 to 8 miles in a day

25lb pack 10 to 14 miles

10lb and under some people can do 30 miles a day.
Few people can do 30mi in a day, regardless of the load. A brisk walk is 3mph. You need to do that, sustained average pace non stop to do 30 mi. in ten hours. Most times of year, that will mean moving in darkness since bugging out probably isn't going to be on a schedule of 7am to 7pm.

IN reality a 15-20 mi walk in one day is a LONG, long walk and I;d say at least 50% of the people reaidng this are going to ahve a tough time with that, no load at all.
Just an observation.;)

ElvenSoul
02-13-2013, 4:24 PM
Few people can do 30mi in a day, regardless of the load. A brisk walk is 3mph. You need to do that, sustained average pace non stop to do 30 mi. in ten hours. Most times of year, that will mean moving in darkness since bugging out probably isn't going to be on a schedule of 7am to 7pm.

IN reality a 15-20 mi walk in one day is a LONG, long walk and I;d say at least 50% of the people reaidng this are going to ahve a tough time with that, no load at all.
Just an observation.;)

I know a bit about walking as I walked the Green Tunnel aka AT Trail in 91'. Hmm I had to bug out twice in the 90's living in Florida. One thing I remember is the Panic. You just feed off the energy of it. I remember people passing out from exhaustion after arriving at the EVAC Point even if they just road all day in a car.

hultgrenks
02-14-2013, 10:07 PM
Like I said, my situation (where my work is located) is 31 miles from home. I suspect it will take me 3 - 4 days to get home. Keeping myself in great shape is a priority for me, and if things are that bad and I know I have a family that is counting on me... I will be able to make it home. I backpack in the Sierras up to 7 days at a time above 10,000 feet while walking up to 10 miles a day with a heavy pack... at sea level it is much easier. Also, I had SERE (Survival Resistance and Escape) training when I was in the military. It is the evading the zombies that will be the greatest problem. Not everyone has had extensive survival training that would be necessary in a situation like this, I have been lucky.

It may take me a while, but the situation will dictate when I can travel, but I have a few routes that keep me away from 99% of the population.

IMHO you have to come up with your own worst case scenario and build your BOB based upon that. Also, keep your self in good physical condition at all times. Everyone needs to keep up on those things under your control.(Physical conditioning, Land Navigation, survival skills outdoors, weapons training, etc.) so that you minimize the situations that are out of your control.

9-12
02-21-2013, 1:20 PM
Like I said, my situation (where my work is located) is 31 miles from home. I suspect it will take me 3 - 4 days to get home. Keeping myself in great shape is a priority for me, and if things are that bad and I know I have a family that is counting on me... I will be able to make it home. I backpack in the Sierras up to 7 days at a time above 10,000 feet while walking up to 10 miles a day with a heavy pack... at sea level it is much easier. Also, I had SERE (Survival Resistance and Escape) training when I was in the military. It is the evading the zombies that will be the greatest problem. Not everyone has had extensive survival training that would be necessary in a situation like this, I have been lucky.

It may take me a while, but the situation will dictate when I can travel, but I have a few routes that keep me away from 99% of the population.

IMHO you have to come up with your own worst case scenario and build your BOB based upon that. Also, keep your self in good physical condition at all times. Everyone needs to keep up on those things under your control.(Physical conditioning, Land Navigation, survival skills outdoors, weapons training, etc.) so that you minimize the situations that are out of your control.Lot of truth in this last paragraph.;)

wood carver
02-22-2013, 3:12 PM
Depending upon your bug out route, and your requirements, you might want to consider a bug out cart. Something like a game cart. Properly balanced a single person can move a significant amount of weight with minimal effort.

Two people make it a breeze.

http://gametote.com/images/cart-reviews/thediyhunter-single-wheel-elk-deer-cart.jpg

I like the looks of that one, especially since it has a brake on it. Do you know the manufacturer?

Brien
02-22-2013, 8:52 PM
Depending upon your bug out route, and your requirements, you might want to consider a bug out cart. Something like a game cart. Properly balanced a single person can move a significant amount of weight with minimal effort.

Two people make it a breeze.

http://gametote.com/images/cart-reviews/thediyhunter-single-wheel-elk-deer-cart.jpg

Wow, that thing is cool. I could totally see using that.

Stan08
02-22-2013, 9:34 PM
^
OK for a permissive environment. After more than a few days and into a non-permissive environment it would be a rolling supply buffet for the not-so-friendly.