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bwiese
08-21-2007, 2:15 AM
DOJ's LE Division oversees BoF.... Sarna reported to Rick Oules, Dir. of LE division.


State Justice official quits after DUI-related crash

Henry K. Lee, Chronicle Staff Writer
Monday, August 20, 2007

(08-20) 20:30 PDT -- A high-ranking state Department of Justice official has resigned after a DUI-related crash near Walnut Creek, officials said Monday.

Pete Sarna, 37, of Clayton, offered his resignation Friday, a week after he collided with a tow truck on Highway 24 and refused to submit to a field sobriety test, according to Attorney General Jerry Brown's spokesman Gareth Lacy and the California Highway Patrol.

Sarna is a former Oakland police lieutenant who was hired by Brown to serve in the state justice department.

"He offered his resignation and it was accepted," Lacy said, declining to elaborate.

Sarna had been paid $132,000 a year to serve as deputy director of the state Department of Justice's Division of Law Enforcement, overseeing numerous state investigators and criminalists.

Sarna, who has been a confidant of Brown since he served as mayor of Oakland, declined to comment Monday night.

At about 12:45 a.m. on Aug. 10, Sarna was driving a state-issued 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe eastbound on Highway 24 near the Ygnacio Valley Road exit when he tried to pass a tow truck, said CHP Sgt. Les Bishop.

"He attempted to change lanes to pass it and didn't quite make it and rear-ended the tow truck," Bishop said. No one was injured, the CHP said.

Sarna declined to submit to a field sobriety test but was otherwise cooperative, Bishop said. Sarna was taken to the CHP's Martinez office, where officers gave him a breath test. Bishop declined to reveal the results, but based on the test, officers cited Sarna for misdemeanor driving under the influence and released him.

The next day, Sarna notified his employers, who asked Glen Craig, a former CHP commissioner and Sacramento County sheriff, to investigate, Lacy said. Sarna was then placed on paid administrative leave until his resignation Friday, Lacy said.

As deputy director of the Division of Law Enforcement, Sarna oversaw a number of crime suppression programs and served as a liaison to other state and local law-enforcement agencies through forensic sciences, narcotics investigation, intelligence and training.

During his 18 years with the Oakland police, Sarna served as a cadet, a drug and sexual-assault investigator and as a hostage negotiator. He rose to level of lieutenant and commanded the Special Operations Group, which sought to clamp down on street-level violence in the city. Sarna was instrumental in bringing "shot spotter" software to the city, in which gunfire could be automatically tracked through GPS technology.

E-mail Henry K. Lee at hlee@sfchronicle.com.

gotgunz
08-21-2007, 2:32 AM
oops? :rolleyes:

metalhead357
08-21-2007, 6:09 AM
I dunno.........

"Accepted his resignation...."

Methinks if it were you or me in a related field the boss woulda canned me, allowing a resignation rather than a firing (at least to me) sends the wrong signals.

((BUT))

But at the same time I now see a great chance for someone to approach this guy and "bring him over to our side" on everything gun-related.......well, thats if he can still be allowed to have guns after all the charges settle.......

Sutcliffe
08-21-2007, 7:08 AM
That whole scandal that Jim March exposed dealing with his bodyguard/drinking buddy that got a CCW despite having a very shady past.

Hoop
08-21-2007, 7:28 AM
He was going to be Rick's replacement as well. I think Rick is still on his way out though, according to my "inside source".

Sarna is a moron & total ******* from what I hear.

SemiAutoSam
08-21-2007, 7:35 AM
MY question is why was he only cited and released and not thrown in the tank and made to post bail like any other drunk driver?

biff
08-21-2007, 8:03 AM
MY question is why was he only cited and released and not thrown in the tank and made to post bail like any other drunk driver?

I was wondering the same thing myself.......interesting.

simonov
08-21-2007, 8:04 AM
MY question is why was he only cited and released and not thrown in the tank and made to post bail like any other drunk driver?

Some animals are more equal than others.

USMC_2651_E5
08-21-2007, 8:55 AM
;)MY question is why was he only cited and released and not thrown in the tank and made to post bail like any other drunk driver?

Sam,
DUI is only a misdemeanor unless there are injuries involved. Offenders of mis. DUI are cited and released after a sobering period, unless there is someone sober available to take responsibility of the drunk. There is no bail involved when someone gets a citation. By signing the cite they are promising to appear. It doesn't sound like he was treated better than any other drunk. Besides, he lost his job over it. How many people actually lose thier jobs for getting an off duty dui? I would wager that few do.
;)

Piper
08-21-2007, 10:18 AM
;)

Sam,
DUI is only a misdemeanor unless there are injuries involved. Offenders of mis. DUI are cited and released after a sobering period, unless there is someone sober available to take responsibility of the drunk. There is no bail involved when someone gets a citation. By signing the cite they are promising to appear. It doesn't sound like he was treated better than any other drunk. Besides, he lost his job over it. How many people actually lose thier jobs for getting an off duty dui? I would wager that few do.
;)

Well gee, that's not exactly correct. Every deuce I ever took was guaranteed at least a 4-5 hour stay at the CJ. That was to insure that they didn't get kicked loose, and taken home to drive while they were still deuce (yeah, that really has happened). Actually, he's very lucky the other driver wasn't injured. Even so much as an ambulatory injury would have gotten him a felony rap.

Rumpled
08-21-2007, 10:25 AM
I know a guy who worked for SCE and got a DUI in an accident in a SCE car off duty. He got fired.
I'd imagine most people in a company car who get a DUI in it would get canned.

I'm I the only one who thinks that guy got pretty far at age 37?
I thought you generally had to be older to make Lt, but I guess if he had 18 years in, that's a lot.

Won't he lose his license for a year now for refusing a test.

stealthmode
08-21-2007, 10:48 AM
good for him we dont need people like that to be in a position of authority

Fjold
08-21-2007, 11:01 AM
In Kern County, DUI's have to stay for a minimum 6 hour sobering up period unless you're a personal friend of the Sheriff and he comes down to the jail and takes you out personally. (He was defeated in the last election)

megavolt121
08-21-2007, 12:11 PM
Won't he lose his license for a year now for refusing a test.

No, if you are pulled over, you can refuse the test and ask for a blood test back at the station. If he completely refuses, then he loses his license.

Piper
08-21-2007, 12:27 PM
You can refuse to do the stance and balance tests, but you can't refuse the chemical test.

The "Trombetta decision" simply says in substance that you are required by state law to submit to a chemical test of your blood, breath or urine. The Vehicle code section IIRC is 13353 CVC and furthermore you don't have a right to consult an attorney before deciding what test to take.

formerTexan
08-21-2007, 2:39 PM
imho, he did the right thing in refusing the field tests. Anyone that gets into this situation should always opt for a subjective chemical test, because the DUI law specifies blood alcohol level, not how you perform in a field test.

Do LEOs even inform drivers of this choice? Are they taught to do so?

Steyr_223
08-21-2007, 2:48 PM
Yep, he manned up and resigned..I am sure there are others that would make excuses...Carol Migden comes to mind.

wilit
08-21-2007, 6:58 PM
WTF are people thinking? Drinking and driving in a company vehicle? Idiot.

jerryg1776
08-21-2007, 7:03 PM
I want to know who is paying for the damage to the state vehicle and the tow truck. if its the state they had better bill the guy or I will be mad as hell!

ccwguy
08-21-2007, 7:33 PM
I want to know who is paying for the damage to the state vehicle and the tow truck. if its the state they had better bill the guy or I will be mad as hell!


We the people, silly.Bend over, again.

HK fan
08-21-2007, 9:55 PM
Those DOJ guys are quite the outfit, another one bites the dust:
Top state cop arrested in sale of pills
Supervisor from the narcotics bureau allegedly sold erectile dysfunction drug to undercover officers.
By Larry Altman
Staff Writer

The supervisor of the state Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement's gang enforcement team in Los Angeles was charged Tuesday with selling 50 erectile dysfunction pills to undercover police officers in Long Beach.

Special Agent Henry Kim, who works in the agency's Commerce office, was placed on paid administrative leave while he faces criminal charges that could send him to jail and an internal investigation that could end his 18-year law enforcement career.

Kim - a former Los Angeles police officer - was held in high regard in his department, and had received two awards from the state attorney general for his investigations.

"He was one of our more outstanding officers," BNE Assistant Chief Jerry Hunter said. "We are extremely disappointed."

Long Beach police officers had no idea a veteran law enforcement officer was behind the advertisement they discovered on the Craigslist Web site.

Hunter said Kim agreed to sell 50 Cialis pills for $250.

Undercover Long Beach officers met Kim at 9 a.m. Saturday near the intersection of the Long Beach and Artesia freeways, Long Beach police officer Jason Evans said.

Detectives purchased the prescription medication from him and arrested him on suspicion of selling a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance for sale and possession of a firearm while in the commission of a felony.

Kim's duty gun was in his vehicle at the time of his arrest, Hunter said.

Kim, a 40-year-old Los Angeles resident, was booked at the Long Beach jail and held on $30,000 bail until his court appearance Tuesday.

Although initially considered a felony case, prosecutors on Tuesday downgraded Kim's alleged crimes to misdemeanors. The Long Beach City Prosecutor's Office filed four counts: dispensing drugs without a license, prescribing a controlled substance, unlawful prescribing of dangerous drugs without a prescribing physician and unlawfully using the Internet to deliver dangerous drugs without a prescription.

Kim pleaded not guilty during his arraignment Tuesday in Long Beach Court. Commissioner Gary Bounds released Kim on his own recognizance and ordered him to return to court Aug. 21.



If convicted, he likely would receive probation and possibly a short jail term.

Kim's attorney, Deputy Public Defender Steve Lund, did not return a telephone call.

Hunter said detectives had not determined where Kim obtained the Cialis. Kim did not supervise any of the BNE's drug teams, so it was unlikely he obtained it through his job, he said.

The BNE normally investigates larger drug cases, primarily busting up cocaine trafficking rings and taking down methamphetamine laboratories. It works closely with the LA IMPACT police task forces in Southern California.

Kim served with the LAPD from June 1989 to June 1997. The state Department of Justice hired him in August 1998. Kim was promoted to special agent supervisor in October 2004.

Hunter said Kim had never been in any trouble. He called the agent's arrest "very unusual" for the bureau and "extremely unfortunate."

"Our internal affairs investigators are conducting the investigation as we speak," he said. "The discipline will be swift."

MedSpec65
08-21-2007, 10:13 PM
What a heartbreaker. This person worked hard for his stellar career. Now it's over. One huge gap in his judgment on one night. This should be a lesson for all of us. Life can change forever in a flash.

ccwguy
08-21-2007, 10:16 PM
Funny that he had a "public defender" and not retained counsel!!!

CRTguns
08-21-2007, 10:16 PM
Someone slip IC something in his drink so he crashes too!

USMC_2651_E5
08-22-2007, 8:19 AM
Well gee, that's not exactly correct. Every deuce I ever took was guaranteed at least a 4-5 hour stay at the CJ. That was to insure that they didn't get kicked loose, and taken home to drive while they were still deuce (yeah, that really has happened). Actually, he's very lucky the other driver wasn't injured. Even so much as an ambulatory injury would have gotten him a felony rap.

Well gee, I guess its jurisdictional. Some of the dueces I have taken were released in the field. These were mainly the check point arrests in which they were booked in the field and a sober person or a cab could be called for them.

Fjold
08-22-2007, 8:28 AM
What a heartbreaker. This person worked hard for his stellar career. Now it's over. One huge gap in his judgment on one night. This should be a lesson for all of us. Life can change forever in a flash.


Do you actually think that this is the first time that he did something like this? I think that it's more likely that this is the first time that he was caught.

Solidmch
08-22-2007, 8:52 AM
You can refuse to do the stance and balance tests, but you can't refuse the chemical test.

The "Trombetta decision" simply says in substance that you are required by state law to submit to a chemical test of your blood, breath or urine. The Vehicle code section IIRC is 13353 CVC and furthermore you don't have a right to consult an attorney before deciding what test to take.

urine is out. Just breath or blood. Must have been a while since you have done a DUI.

Jicko
08-22-2007, 9:11 AM
Sarna declined to submit to a field sobriety test but was otherwise cooperative, Bishop said. Sarna was taken to the CHP's Martinez office, where officers gave him a breath test. Bishop declined to reveal the results, but based on the test, officers cited Sarna for misdemeanor driving under the influence and released him.


As I have said before.... this is the KEY thing to learn about this story.

Never submit a field sobriety test..... then they do not have "immediate" evident against you in the court.

The "chemical" test (mandatory, but performed back in the station; rather than on the roadside), which is either blood or breath or urine, that was taken back in the CHP station would have been taken some time after you actually "driving".... and all they have is a guesstimate how much BAC do you have in your body while you drove.... you stand a much better chance of getting away(with the case dismissed) than if they immediate evident of "field sobriety test" or "roadside breathe test", even tho these tests are known to be inaccurate!


Won't he lose his license for a year now for refusing a test.

If you try to deny the "field sobriety test" or "roadside breathe test", some cops will try to scare you by saying that "if you deny the chemical test, you will automatically lose your license for a year", which is true, BUT these 2 tests are NOT what he meant by "chemical test"!!!!! The "chemical test" is the one that you would have to let them perform back in the station - blood, breathe or urine.

If they try to tell you that "you will lose your lic if you deny", it is the time that you emphasize that you "are cooperating and you are willing to submit chemical test, but just to refuse to perform the roadside tests."

bwiese
08-22-2007, 10:14 AM
Damn, we got some reall winners at the DOJ... remember the DOJ personal protection guy (i.e, Lockyer's driver/bodyguard) busted for kiddie porn/underage?

supersonic
08-22-2007, 11:26 AM
I think my sig line says it all.:confused:
S.S.:43:

HK fan
08-22-2007, 4:45 PM
Is this the beginning of the house cleaning? Maybe this one will do a better job at keeping the troops in line, at least better than the guy that is retiring in disgrace Oulles:

Sacramento undersheriff gets state post
By Andy Furillo - Bee Capitol Bureau

Last Updated 10:11 am PDT Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Story appeared in section, Page A3

Print | E-Mail | Comments (0) | Digg it | del.icio.us

Sacramento County Undersheriff George Anderson was appointed Wednesday as the new chief of law enforcement for the state Department of Justice.

California Attorney General Jerry Brown announced Anderson's appointment at a press conference at his agency's headquarters in downtown Sacramento.

Anderson is a 28-year sheriff's veteran who was appointed as undersheriff in June 2006. Anderson also had served as head of law enforcement overseeing sheriff's operations in the county's recently-incorporated cities. In addition, Anderson was the first Rancho Cordova police chief.

Solidmch
08-22-2007, 6:44 PM
Well gee, I guess its jurisdictional. Some of the dueces I have taken were released in the field. These were mainly the check point arrests in which they were booked in the field and a sober person or a cab could be called for them.

+2 on that

SemiAutoSam
08-22-2007, 6:50 PM
I just found his new License Plate.

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j184/mag-lock/license_20070822184649_80220.jpg

Beatone
08-22-2007, 6:52 PM
MY question is why was he only cited and released and not thrown in the tank and made to post bail like any other drunk driver?

He's not a civilian like us. He gets a pass while we would have been crucified.
:mad:
:mad:
:mad:

Piper
08-22-2007, 11:54 PM
urine is out. Just breath or blood. Must have been a while since you have done a DUI.

Yeah, it's been a while. I guess all of those cops getting grossed out with someones pee finally won out.

HK fan
08-23-2007, 4:56 PM
I just found his new License Plate.

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j184/mag-lock/license_20070822184649_80220.jpg

How would you like to be the new guy and see that plate on your state car? Doh!

HK fan
08-23-2007, 6:14 PM
very nice, got it thanks.