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View Full Version : Transferring weapon to brother who is a quadraplegic


Risky1
12-29-2012, 8:47 AM
My brother, who lives quite a distance from me, broke his neck in an auto accident a number of years ago. He has two boys who go shooting with us when the cousins get together. Unfortunately, this is a rare occasion.
He would like to own a 10/22 so that when a other friend is available to take he had his boys shooting, he has one a available. He says that the adult friend would be the one who ensures the rifle is secured after each trip and that the keys would be stored with his father in law who lives down the street.

I don't see anywhere where he is prohibited from owning a weapon. Although he cannot actually sign the form. Is this correct? And anyone have any ideas how this could be done as he can't physically sign?

Jeff213
12-29-2012, 8:49 AM
If one of your parents is still alive, you can simply transfer the gun to the parent and they can transfer the gun to the brother, no paperwork required.

Risky1
12-29-2012, 9:48 AM
Short answer is no. Parents are not capable of participating in this.

lorax3
12-29-2012, 12:18 PM
And anyone have any ideas how this could be done as he can't physically sign?

Interesting question of not being able to sign the 4473. I do have to ask, is he under any sort of conservatorship?

Agro
12-29-2012, 12:28 PM
Who says the signature needs to look like John Hancock's? Cant he put a pen in his mouth and make an extremely crappy mark. This is where they get the saying "make your mark", since people wanting to enlist during the Civil War couldnt read or write, they just made some mark and you're good to go.

Wolverine
12-29-2012, 1:55 PM
Who says the signature needs to look like John Hancock's? Cant he put a pen in his mouth and make an extremely crappy mark. This is where they get the saying "make your mark", since people wanting to enlist during the Civil War couldnt read or write, they just made some mark and you're good to go.

I believe this is correct. I knew a quadriplegic that wrote with a pen held in his mouth. His penmanship was better than mine. Also, people that have lost the use of their arms routinely learn to write with their feet.

I wonder what would happen if he bought a handgun though. Would he be denied because he couldn't do the safety demonstration? My guess is Yes, he would be denied. Then the question is, can he legitimately be denied given Heller?

JoshuaS
12-29-2012, 7:38 PM
They make adaptive devices for hunting for those without use of hands (cf http://www.beadaptive.com/pages/hq100.htm ). I wonder if one could show they know how to use such devices (maybe without having to purchase) they could get the safety clearance

redcliff
12-29-2012, 9:00 PM
My brother, who lives quite a distance from me, broke his neck in an auto accident a number of years ago. He has two boys who go shooting with us when the cousins get together. Unfortunately, this is a rare occasion.
He would like to own a 10/22 so that when a other friend is available to take he had his boys shooting, he has one a available. He says that the adult friend would be the one who ensures the rifle is secured after each trip and that the keys would be stored with his father in law who lives down the street.
I don't see anywhere where he is prohibited from owning a weapon. Although he cannot actually sign the form. Is this correct? And anyone have any ideas how this could be done as he can't physically sign?

The father-in-law can give a rifle directly to one of his grand-sons (your brother's sons) without paperwork or registration if thats an option.

DarthSean
01-02-2013, 4:10 PM
If he has any use of his wrists, fingers, or elbows (any one will do), people have come up with all kinds of ways to attach a pen to make their signature.

RP1911
01-02-2013, 4:59 PM
Think ADA and how you can use it to your advantage.