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View Full Version : Cheap fire starting option.


frigginchi
12-27-2012, 7:30 PM
Not tactical or cool but they work. $30 for a pack of 50.


http://s.ecrater.com/stores/185034/4cc7d4116ec4a_185034n.jpg

KevinB
12-27-2012, 8:11 PM
Yep, and most head shops have a lanyard that the lighter fits into and hangs around your neck.

Watch Wally World for cheaper prices sometimes.

OldShooter32
12-27-2012, 8:40 PM
Road flares guys. Every cop knows they will light anytime, anywhere.

OldShooter32
12-27-2012, 8:40 PM
Road flares guys. Every cop knows they will light anytime, anywhere.

frigginchi
12-27-2012, 8:51 PM
Is that a road flare in your pocket or are ya happy to see me? :D
Road flares guys. Every cop knows they will light anytime, anywhere.

Scuba951
12-27-2012, 9:00 PM
Lint is great kindling and sparks up very easily.
I keep some in my camping gear box that's with me every time I go camping.

Grizzled Bastard
12-27-2012, 9:21 PM
A smudge of vaseline on a cottonball. A lifetime supply of each for $2 at your local .99 Store.

Intimid8tor
12-27-2012, 9:22 PM
Cotton makeup pads work well as kindling as well. You can even throw some vaseline on them so they burn longer. Hand gel with alcohol in it is fantastic to start a fire as well.

Yehosha
12-28-2012, 9:16 AM
Not tactical or cool but they work. $30 for a pack of 50.


http://s.ecrater.com/stores/185034/4cc7d4116ec4a_185034n.jpg
Exactly. Every BOB or survival kit should have a few in addition to a fire starter/striker. Lighters could break/leak/dryout so it's good to have a striker as a back up.

SMOKEYMOUNTAIN
12-28-2012, 12:50 PM
How long is the shelf life on those bics?

CSACANNONEER
12-28-2012, 12:56 PM
That's no cheap. Learning how to start a fire with what you find in nature is cheaper and a hell of a lot more practical for a real world situation. I do carry a CC sized magnifier in my wallet but, I can start a fire with flint and steel or a hand drill.

SNCaliber
12-28-2012, 1:30 PM
flint and striker for sure, i keep one in the truck at all times

SNCaliber
12-28-2012, 1:30 PM
flint and striker for sure, i keep one in the truck at all times

sargenv
12-28-2012, 1:50 PM
I read once about paraffin wax with dryer lint impregnated in it makes a somewhat cheap, portable fire starter... Seemed to work pretty good for me.. the lint acts like several "wicks" when you light it.

stubbornbull
12-28-2012, 3:51 PM
Not tactical or cool but they work. $30 for a pack of 50.


http://s.ecrater.com/stores/185034/4cc7d4116ec4a_185034n.jpg

smoker here, so i always have at least one. fire the hard way is also a priceless tool

chillincody
12-28-2012, 4:02 PM
I use a 9v batt and steel wool :) works fine for me

Bobio
12-28-2012, 4:18 PM
That's the biggest problem with the no smoking movement. I know I'm gonna end sometime some where and need to start a fire and no one will have matches. Ever try to start a fire from a car lighter. I think I'm gonna through some lighters in my car tonight,

Grizzled Bastard
12-28-2012, 6:29 PM
That's the biggest problem with the no smoking movement. I know I'm gonna end sometime some where and need to start a fire and no one will have matches. Ever try to start a fire from a car lighter. I think I'm gonna through some lighters in my car tonight,


Boxes and boxes of "Strike Anywhere" matches are super cheap and if store in their wrapped and sealed container in a safe place, will last a decade.

acegunnr
12-28-2012, 6:32 PM
Lint is great kindling and sparks up very easily.
I keep some in my camping gear box that's with me every time I go camping.

Just make sure the lint you collect from the dryer is from cotton and not the polyester/nylon clothing. :eek:

Dutch3
12-28-2012, 7:14 PM
The Bic lighters are much better than the "no name" knockoffs. Bics have much less tendency to leak when stored for long periods. Worth the extra dollar, IMHO.

I use the Rutland "Fire Starter Squares" from TSC for lighting my pellet stove. Basically paraffin-impregnated cardboard. Very cheap and easier to store than bags of lint. I have a few boxes of them vacuum sealed in my BOBs and vehicles. Strike-anywhere matches, too.

Don't forget a magnifying glass/sun as a fire starter, too. Somewhere, I have a credit card-size Fresnel lens. I wish I could find it.

Road flares are getting hard to find around here. TSC has them, but I have so far been unwilling to cough up $4 for each.

Dutch3
12-28-2012, 7:18 PM
How long is the shelf life on those bics?

While rebuilding my front porch several years ago, I found a Bic lighter that had been under there for at least 15 years. It lit on the second flick. Good enough for me.

acegunnr
12-28-2012, 7:47 PM
I read once about paraffin wax with dryer lint impregnated in it makes a somewhat cheap, portable fire starter... Seemed to work pretty good for me.. the lint acts like several "wicks" when you light it.

Boy Scout firestarter:

Pack dryer lint (cotton not polyester/nylon) into cardboard egg carton trays (don't use styrofoam trays duh). Pour melted wax into lint filled trays. Cut trays to individual pieces.

DanM
12-28-2012, 8:10 PM
Here is something to check out, I've made these for years and have used them backpacking and in camp.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/mcdougall114.html

bill_k_lopez
12-28-2012, 8:42 PM
http://i263.photobucket.com/albums/ii145/Allen1901/OhioBlueTipMatches.jpg

Strike anywhere matches 'bout a $1.95 a box. 250 matches per box.

JoshuaS
12-28-2012, 9:28 PM
I prefer an adjustable disposable light. Pop the head off, crank it up, and you have a huge flame if you need it. Very useful in lighting a fire IMHO

The cotton and petroleum jelly works great. Parafin coated strike anywheres.

And my favorite I learned in boys scouts, steel wool and a 9vlt or 12vlt battery. Touch the steel wool to the terminals, and it burns for a while.

Eldraque
12-28-2012, 9:31 PM
Ive used my jumper cables + my cars battery to light a cigarette before lol

Gun_Owner_901
12-29-2012, 5:14 AM
I like to use a couple of gun cleaning patchs when I go camping.

spamsucker
12-29-2012, 6:05 AM
My oldest Bic lighter is 19 years old and still works. It just doesn't get used often... I lose it and find it some years later, light a smoke and immediately and deliberately lose it again. Shelf life is infinite as near as I can tell. Anyone ever tried to start an emergency fire without a Bic knows you want the Bic. Avoid crickett.

kali12bear
12-29-2012, 9:59 PM
this guy use vaseline & cotton

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF4WDVVDTp0

kali12bear
12-29-2012, 9:59 PM
this guy use vaseline & cotton

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF4WDVVDTp0

billetmann
12-30-2012, 10:36 AM
how about the lint I store in my belly button- never leave home without it :)

Kanoodler
12-30-2012, 10:36 AM
I have fun using Fritos for kindling. Well, any greasy corn chip will probably work, but I have only used Fritos. And yes, they really work! And you can eat your kindling!! Well, it's a multi-tasker at least! I always have a bag in the car because it serves as a snack or kindling and will keep pretty much forever in a ziplock! Give it a try!

donny douchebag
12-30-2012, 11:58 AM
Not flint, ferrocerium

jtv3062
12-30-2012, 12:09 PM
flint and striker for sure, i keep one in the truck at all times
+ char cloth.

CSACANNONEER
12-30-2012, 12:16 PM
+ char cloth.

Someone really knows what he/she is talking about! Sometimes, I use char rope instead but, 100% cotton rope isn't always easy to find.

C&Rtrader
12-30-2012, 1:51 PM
I have used dryer lint and cotton balls with vaseline. Both work very well. Get a zip lock bag and leave it by the dryer. after 6 months you should have a good supply... or just go to a local laundry mat with a zip lock bag and stock up there.

kaligaran
12-30-2012, 2:29 PM
I use a small ziptie and tighten it up under the button to keep it from getting pressed and releasing the gas while they are in my bag. So far it's worked for years without coming off (I have a few in various bags).

I also keep some gorilla tap wrapped around them. It's surprisingly handy.

sunborder
12-30-2012, 3:37 PM
The short version is that anyone who wants to have a reliable fire source with them at all times can do so, and for ridiculously cheap.

I have nearly a dozen ferrocerium rods of various sizes ("Firesteels") stashed in various places, and nearly always have one with me. I find them more reliable than any other technique/tool that is handy enough to carry around everywhere. I particularly like using an old tylenol/aspirin bottle with a small firesteel & striker inside, with cotton balls filling in the empty space. A little pill-sized ziploc contains a bit of vaseline, in case I can't make a feather stick for some reason (A good feather stick and a cotton ball should take you from spark to small cooking fire...).

sunborder
12-30-2012, 3:37 PM
The short version is that anyone who wants to have a reliable fire source with them at all times can do so, and for ridiculously cheap.

I have nearly a dozen ferrocerium rods of various sizes ("Firesteels") stashed in various places, and nearly always have one with me. I find them more reliable than any other technique/tool that is handy enough to carry around everywhere. I particularly like using an old tylenol/aspirin bottle with a small firesteel & striker inside, with cotton balls filling in the empty space. A little pill-sized ziploc contains a bit of vaseline, in case I can't make a feather stick for some reason (A good feather stick and a cotton ball should take you from spark to small cooking fire...).

wjc
12-30-2012, 3:47 PM
The short version is that anyone who wants to have a reliable fire source with them at all times can do so, and for ridiculously cheap.

I have nearly a dozen ferrocerium rods of various sizes ("Firesteels") stashed in various places, and nearly always have one with me. I find them more reliable than any other technique/tool that is handy enough to carry around everywhere. I particularly like using an old tylenol/aspirin bottle with a small firesteel & striker inside, with cotton balls filling in the empty space. A little pill-sized ziploc contains a bit of vaseline, in case I can't make a feather stick for some reason (A good feather stick and a cotton ball should take you from spark to small cooking fire...).

yup.

Don't forget the knowledge to make a bow drill or bamboo firestarter.

Me...I'll stick to Ohio Blue Tip matches...I have a case of them.

:43:

jtv3062
12-30-2012, 4:15 PM
yup.

Don't forget the knowledge to make a bow drill or bamboo firestarter.

Me...I'll stick to Ohio Blue Tip matches...I have a case of them.

:43:

You ever seen what happens when you drop a case of those?

A huge cloud of smoke and shocked looking faces of employees and customers in line of a busy grocery store.

sunborder
12-30-2012, 5:20 PM
I've mucked about with bow-drill method, gotten coals several times, could never get the coals to light even a cotton ball. Still working on that. Need to develop a better bearing block; something portable, like a knife handle or scabbard inset.

I like that the firesteels will work even when wet. My primary firesteel also has a magnesium bar and a little pill-ziploc with magnesium shavings pre-cut. That particular kit is NOT on the cheap side, however ($25+).

wjc
12-31-2012, 2:28 PM
Ive used my jumper cables + my cars battery to light a cigarette before lol

I've lit cigs with oxy-acetolyne torches and arc welders.

some fun...woot!

wjc
12-31-2012, 2:33 PM
I've mucked about with bow-drill method, gotten coals several times, could never get the coals to light even a cotton ball. Still working on that. Need to develop a better bearing block; something portable, like a knife handle or scabbard inset.

I like that the firesteels will work even when wet. My primary firesteel also has a magnesium bar and a little pill-ziploc with magnesium shavings pre-cut. That particular kit is NOT on the cheap side, however ($25+).

Well dried Redwood works really well for the board and shaft. I collect pine needles off the road to use as a birds nest. The cars break up the fibers and they work pretty well.

For the top of the drill, I have one of two choices. A small block of wood with a divet carved in..or...my Openel knife has a small hole drilled in the side to use as the block.

stix213
12-31-2012, 3:20 PM
Man guys, how can anyone here say you are prepared if you aren't EDC'ing a way to make fire? I usually am carrying my CGF Contributor Zippo, but I at least have a bic.

Dragunov
12-31-2012, 3:23 PM
How about this:

Fire steel.
Tinder bundle/dryer lint.
Or a medicine bottle with a couple of petroleum jelly soaked cotton balls.

wjc
01-03-2013, 1:27 AM
Man guys, how can anyone here say you are prepared if you aren't EDC'ing a way to make fire? I usually am carrying my CGF Contributor Zippo, but I at least have a bic.

um...I always carry this:

189579

I also have magnesium fire starters, a magnifying glass, and blue tip matches.

I also know how to make and use a bow drill and bamboo fire starter.

For normal everyday use I also carry an American Flag Zippo.

Am I unprepared?

HDoctane
01-03-2013, 6:58 PM
nothing beats a flint n steel considering the world is covered with flint quartz or churt stones and you can practicly make char cloth from anyhting

twinpalms1
01-03-2013, 11:25 PM
During college in Colorado, the locals trick to light a fire in the wind was using cheetos as kindling. They're pure oil and burn like a duraflame log.

Bic lighters. No brainer. They work even if soaking wet. Cotton balls in vaseline stored in old pill bottles or film canisters work great too. Magnesium and ferro rods work, but why bother? Hassle. I have them, but never use them.

Sanderhawk
01-04-2013, 5:11 AM
I like the magnesium stick they are fun to use but I have bic lighters in all my vehicals and camping hiking gear too. I want a fire fast :)

Sierra57
01-07-2013, 5:20 PM
Pine and fir pitch (sap) works well with dry broken down pine needles or dry ground up leaves. According to a buddy of mine it is also good for putting on wounds - he says it helps clot the blood faster, and supposedly has a natural anti fungal agent in it that can help fight infection.

Don't think I'd try it on a femoral artery bleed, though. :eek:

I always carry a couple of Bic lighters in a zip lock bag in my truck and some more with my camping gear. I also carry road flares - not only for an accident scene, but also for lighting fires if need be.

Flares can also be used at night for signaling for help, along with those little magnesium strobe discs you can buy at fire works stands. Those can be seen a long way off.

sunborder
01-08-2013, 1:00 AM
If I need to signal someone at a distance at night, I am not lighting magnesium. My 500 lumen rechargeable pocket flashlight will do...

http://www.hexbright.com/

The blinking mode @ 500 lumens will damn sure get someone's attention.

SMOKEYMOUNTAIN
01-08-2013, 2:35 PM
Just make sure the lint you collect from the dryer is from cotton and not the polyester/nylon clothing. :eek:

What happens?

Sierra57
01-08-2013, 10:17 PM
If I need to signal someone at a distance at night, I am not lighting magnesium. My 500 lumen rechargeable pocket flashlight will do...

http://www.hexbright.com/

The blinking mode @ 500 lumens will damn sure get someone's attention.

That looks like a good flashlight. I gotta get one.

slo5oh
01-08-2013, 10:52 PM
That flashlight charges off a usb connection?
$99 is pretty pricey imho. I'll stick with my $10 ultrafire 502b... I picked up 4 of them a couple months back and while i doubt the 900 lumens they claim, it throws a crazy amount of light. Only drawback is if you don't already have 18650 batteries and a charger.
Btw, loving this thread!! Keep it going.
Back on subject, i keep a fresnel lense in my wallet and a harbor freight magnesium fire starter in the car. For anyone that owns these but hasn't used it yet, test it out. There is a short learning curve and you don't want your first time to be during an emergency.

sunborder
01-09-2013, 7:41 AM
That flashlight charges off a usb connection?
$99 is pretty pricey imho. I'll stick with my $10 ultrafire 502b... I picked up 4 of them a couple months back and while i doubt the 900 lumens they claim, it throws a crazy amount of light. Only drawback is if you don't already have 18650 batteries and a charger.
Btw, loving this thread!! Keep it going.
Back on subject, i keep a fresnel lense in my wallet and a harbor freight magnesium fire starter in the car. For anyone that owns these but hasn't used it yet, test it out. There is a short learning curve and you don't want your first time to be during an emergency.

It is pretty pricey. I got in when the kickstarter was $60. That said, it's not just the USB charger. It's programmable, open-source, water-tight, and built like a tank. I believe it also has a motion sensor in it, for those who are going to do serious programming.

It is NOT EMP-proof, however, for those who are concerned about such things. I am not. Where I live, if there's an emp, I'm going to be a glowing wisp of sub-atomic particles or somesuch. Bracketed by military bases on every side. For an EDC flashlight, though, it is awesome (if a bit on the large side...but my EDC bag is a Maxpedition Falcon II, so I have plenty of room).

Crazyhorse
01-09-2013, 8:16 AM
I have flint/steel, lighters, striker and propane blow torch. Which btw, I love using my torch to light my charcoal bbq :P

CH

SURVIVOR619
01-09-2013, 7:16 PM
Lint is great kindling and sparks up very easily.
I keep some in my camping gear box that's with me every time I go camping.

We stuff all dryer lint in my home into an empty plastic water bottle that once full, slides into the BOB... This amounts to tons of lightweight fire starter!

Decoligny
01-10-2013, 9:55 AM
Cotton makeup pads work well as kindling TINDER as well. You can even throw some vaseline on them so they burn longer. Hand gel with alcohol in it is fantastic to start a fire as well.

Tinder is the very fine very dry flammable material used to take a spark from a flint and develop it from an ember to a flame.

Kindling is the small twigs and branches into which you put your burning tinder bundle to get the fire going. Once you have a fire of kindling going, you add larger sticks, and then finally logs.

You will find it almost impossible to light a fire starting with just kindling.

Most people who have a fireplace use kindling piled on top of newspaper (tinder) to get the fire going.

GeeDog
01-13-2013, 10:56 AM
Magnesium starters are what I keep stashed around. It burns so much hotter than a standard flame and will even start wet tinder.

Gun_Owner_901
01-26-2013, 3:23 AM
steel wool & a 9 volt battery.

wpage
01-26-2013, 1:51 PM
Melt down old candles and dump on pine cones for fire starters..