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Spark1815
12-24-2012, 4:29 PM
It is a Mod. 98
It appears all of the serial numbers match. 8296 is present on the receiver, bolt and bottom of the gun near the trigger mechanism.

The barrel indicates 141 41 and bys.
Just below that there is a German symbol and bcd. The rifle has mounts for a scope. I removed to get the pictures of the barrel.

There is a little rust on the bottom of the barrel. But other than that it appears to be in god shape. Even a little oil still in the bolt area. I have not disassembled.

I have attached some photos for review.

186782

186783

186784

186785

186786

Thank You,
Chris

7.62x63mmUS
12-24-2012, 4:49 PM
And your question is?

Rogerbutthead
12-24-2012, 5:24 PM
Your rifle appears to have been made in 1942 by Gustloff Werke, Weimar - marked bcd

Backbone of the Wehrmacht estimates 158,188 were made with that mark that year.

The barrel was made by Ruhrstahl AG- code bys in 1941.

Your rifle will never be considered all matching as the original stock was serial numbered to the action - as well as various other parts like bands also numbered appear missing from your sporterized Mauser.

Not sure was a rusty sporterized mauser goes for these days, but it is no where near what an untouched original sample would bring off of an auction site.

Spark1815
12-24-2012, 6:43 PM
Thank you for the information. I appreciate it. What determines that it was Sportsterized?
Also, is there any way to tell what caliber and ammunition this rifle is without taking to a gunsmith?

Dutch3
12-24-2012, 7:09 PM
What determines that it was Sportsterized?

For starters, the stock is not original. Recoil pad, cheek piece, way shorter that it should be, etc. No bayonet lug. "Scope mounts", etc.

cruddymutt
12-24-2012, 7:18 PM
Your rifle was originally issued to the German military in 1942. Its model is a Karabiner 98 Kurtz or, as we now call them, K98. Sometime after WW2, more than likely here stateside, your rifle was "sporterized".
By sporterize we mean your rifle has been modified from its original, as issued configuration. Your receiver has been drilled and tapped, not original. Your bolt looks to have been modified, not original. Also your stock is not original or even in original configuration. You are also missing the bayonet lug, front and rear barrel bands, band spring, upper hand guard, butt plate and stock from what I can see.
Many rifles were sporterized after being brought back by US GIs coming home from Europe. To me its part of that rifles history now but many will frown upon it. Definatly collector value is gone. Enjoy the rifle for what it is, not for what it isnt. Of course this rifle could have been sporterized yesterday as well. You may never know when it was done.
The barrel looks to have a military styled step taper and German barrel code so its pretty safe to think its still chambered in 8mm Mauser also known as 7.92x57 which is its original chambering. Try slugging the bore to get an actual measurement.

Spark1815
12-24-2012, 7:43 PM
I just realized that the first couple of sentences of my original post disappeared...

This gun was brought back from Germany during WWII. He was in the 38th Engineer Regiment. Originally sent to the Ascension Island to build an airstrip and camp, they were eventually sent to Germany.

He was the only owner between his return and now. He must have had it 'sporterized' when he returned.

I'm definitely not looking to get rid of it. Keeping it in the family.

Thank you for the info.

toby
12-24-2012, 8:09 PM
For the Collector or Purist it's a basket case, for the Enthusiast the Rifleman and the Hunter it is a great firearm and net worth is about $300-$400, I have many,Enjoy

Justin Case
12-24-2012, 8:42 PM
For the Collector or Purist it's a basket case, for the Enthusiast the Rifleman and the Hunter it is a great firearm and net worth is about $300-$400, I have many,Enjoy

What he said.

cruddymutt
12-24-2012, 8:59 PM
I just realized that the first couple of sentences of my original post disappeared...

This gun was brought back from Germany during WWII. He was in the 38th Engineer Regiment. Originally sent to the Ascension Island to build an airstrip and camp, they were eventually sent to Germany.

He was the only owner between his return and now. He must have had it 'sporterized' when he returned.

I'm definitely not looking to get rid of it. Keeping it in the family.

Thank you for the info.

This right here makes it priceless. If someone from my family brought back something from WW2 there is no way I would sell it, no matter the worth. Someday I will have my fathers CHP issued S&W .40 and 38 SPC that he carried while on patrol and his 38 SPC Detective Special he carried in his boot as back up. I could never sell those.

backstrap
12-24-2012, 10:50 PM
Cash value if sold is $250-$300. It's good to see someone on here looking for more than a buyer. I based my value off what Russian captured Mausers go for which is 3-$400. Any chance the original stock was kept around? I could link a photo but to descriptor it, look for a stock with metal disk in the buttstock slightly larger than a quarter.

Rogerbutthead
12-24-2012, 10:51 PM
Regarding the caliber of this rifle, some GI's were known to ream the chamber of a 98K and make it an 8MM-06 rifle.
http://www.reloadbench.com/cartridges/w8mm06.html

To be safe, a chamber casting is usually done by those who don't want their rifle to explode by accident (I really don't know what would happen if you fired a 7.92x57 in a 7.92x63 chamber, but I can't imagine it would be good.)

http://www.shootingtimes.com/2012/04/18/how-to-determine-an-unknown-chambering/

If my dad or grandpa ever left me a rifle, I would treasure it even if it were one of those POS Spanish 1916's in 308.

Rogerbutthead
12-24-2012, 10:55 PM
If you did find the original stock in good shape with the buttplate and bands, it would probably bring a comparable price on eBay to what the rifle would bring at an auction site sale.

Dutch3
12-25-2012, 8:30 AM
If my dad or grandpa ever left me a rifle, I would treasure it even if it were one of those POS Spanish 1916's in 308.

I have one of those. It makes great fireballs. :D

I also have a Chilean Modelo 1912 that has been sporterized. It does have the original stock, although seriously modified. A great shooting rifle, it exceeds my capabilities with iron sights.

I will never get rid of either one. Fun to shoot and historical.

Flouncer
12-25-2012, 8:53 AM
Regarding the caliber of this rifle, some GI's were known to ream the chamber of a 98K and make it an 8MM-06 rifle.
http://www.reloadbench.com/cartridges/w8mm06.html

To be safe, a chamber casting is usually done by those who don't want their rifle to explode by accident (I really don't know what would happen if you fired a 7.92x57 in a 7.92x63 chamber, but I can't imagine it would be good.)

http://www.shootingtimes.com/2012/04/18/how-to-determine-an-unknown-chambering/

If my dad or grandpa ever left me a rifle, I would treasure it even if it were one of those POS Spanish 1916's in 308.

He could also, with care, simply try to chamber a 30-06 cartridge. If it chambers, the original chamber has been opened up, lengthened, most likely to 8mm-06, 64mm. If the 30-06 does not chamber is most likely left in the shorter 8x57 stock dimension.

Either way a priceless piece of history and family.