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View Full Version : My childrens 2nd rights.


savageevo
12-19-2012, 7:23 PM
Okay for you calgunners that have children, Say there is a ban and we, who have guns, we want to secure our kids future in passing down our firearms to them. How can we do that now before we can it is not too late. I was informed to get our kids legal CA id from the dmv. Once they have the Id, we can transfer it to them regardless of age. Please school me in the process. thanks all.

Lone_Gunman
12-19-2012, 7:38 PM
As far as I know no legal ID is required. A parent to child transfer is paperless until 1/1/14 when the long gun registration law goes into effect in CA. That may change on the federal level Re: assault weapons with new legislation I don't know.

What I'm going to do, to prove that the weapons belonged to my kids before any bans or long gun registration is to type up a statement that I am giving xxxx rifle in xxxx caliber, serial number xxxxx to my child on xxx date. I'm then going to have it notarized. I'm planning on doing this next week.

savageevo
12-19-2012, 8:05 PM
I am going to feel a little funny doing that especially when the notary reads that. Can we just write the letter seal it in a envelope and mail it to myself. its sealed and dated from a US agency. Do you have the link for that intrafamily paperwork from the doj. thanks

john67elco
12-19-2012, 9:10 PM
Nope I'm noterizing mine after Saturdays polish Ak UF build party. I'm serial the flat and noterizing through a good friend out of upland a gift of sale document. My 2 kids will own 14 guns by next week. I've been accumulating double rifles for years. 30-30s 12gauges ARs and AKs. If they sell one of them I'll come back from the dead and that will be in the document as well.

bigbully
12-19-2012, 11:01 PM
What about handguns?

AIMSMALL
12-19-2012, 11:19 PM
Those last 2 post are great! Haha, I like the notary idea too, I think I'll do the same for my kids, now the problem is, who gets what....

pardou
12-20-2012, 12:21 AM
can you 'legally' pass on a AR (fully legal bought in 2012) to my child? i would like them to have it of there is some bann on 'assult types' and a bann on grandfathering in weapons. Would it be considered 'grandfathering' if you give it to them now?

roushstage2
12-20-2012, 12:23 AM
I didn't actually think that far into it, but that's actually not a bad idea...

Librarian
12-20-2012, 1:33 PM
can you 'legally' pass on a AR (fully legal bought in 2012) to my child? i would like them to have it of there is some bann on 'assult types' and a bann on grandfathering in weapons. Would it be considered 'grandfathering' if you give it to them now?

Yes, you can.

There is no age limit to receive a long gun until 2014.

It's only 'grandfathering' now if a grandfather gives it. Grandfathering is a shorthand for 'the law we pass today will affect new stuff only - all the existing stuff is unaffected', for whatever stuff the law is about.

M. D. Van Norman
12-20-2012, 2:46 PM
Under no circumstances can we allow new bans to stand … for our children’s sake. :chris:

IPSICK
12-20-2012, 2:57 PM
So do I have to give them my guns now? Or can interfamilial transfer of banned weapons occur after a ban? My kids are only 5 weeks and 3 years old.

Garbageman69
12-20-2012, 3:52 PM
Interested to see where this goes, as it looks like I'll be giving all my guns to my kids so they can have them when they are grown up. Mods - Sticky this please!

oddball
12-20-2012, 3:58 PM
What I'm going to do, to prove that the weapons belonged to my kids before any bans or long gun registration is to type up a statement that I am giving xxxx rifle in xxxx caliber, serial number xxxxx to my child on xxx date. I'm then going to have it notarized. I'm planning on doing this next week.

I've done this already, glad to see others are doing this.

oddball
12-20-2012, 4:04 PM
What about handguns?

Nope. You can give your 18 yo or older child a handgun, but he /she needs a Handgun Safety Certificate and need to fill out a intrafamily form from CA. and send them some money.

Younger child is a no go.

bigbully
12-20-2012, 4:35 PM
Nope. You can give your 18 yo or older child a handgun, but he /she needs a Handgun Safety Certificate and need to fill out a intrafamily form from CA. and send them some money.

Younger child is a no go.

Oh well. I'm sure they will be happy with the AR-15s :D

fizux
12-20-2012, 4:48 PM
I'm then going to have it notarized. I'm planning on doing this next week.

PM me if you want a 2A friendly notary in the SF Bay Area that provides a $10 CGN discount.

Librarian
12-20-2012, 4:50 PM
So do I have to give them my guns now? Or can interfamilial transfer of banned weapons occur after a ban? My kids are only 5 weeks and 3 years old.

Since we can't know that until some new law is passed, that question cannot be answered.

six seven tango
12-20-2012, 5:44 PM
Might be a dumb question, but why couldn't you just put everything into a trust and name them in the trust?

Eldraque
12-20-2012, 5:53 PM
Nope. You can give your 18 yo or older child a handgun, but he /she needs a Handgun Safety Certificate and need to fill out a intrafamily form from CA. and send them some money.

Younger child is a no go.

how does DOJ know if the reciever of the interfamily transfer has a HSC??

BigfootHunter
12-20-2012, 5:58 PM
Also curious how a firearms trust might fit into all of this. I was considering setting one up anyway re: AOW items.

Intimid8tor
12-20-2012, 6:07 PM
I asked this same question not long ago and the trust was a route recommended. As soon as my prepaid legal subscription kicks in I am finding a firearms lawyer to write a firearms trust and my son will be a trustee.

six seven tango
12-20-2012, 6:14 PM
how does DOJ know if the reciever of the interfamily transfer has a HSC??

HSC has a unique number on it that is registered to the holder by name and CA ID/drivers license number. I've never seen the interfamily transfer form, but I'm sure there's a place on there for the HSC number if required, and DOJ would undoubtably verify it.

savageevo
12-20-2012, 8:04 PM
Anybody here that is in socal a notory. Im willing to drive out to you to do this. Im in the coachella valley area. I can drive out to you since I drive all over socal anyway. thanks

john67elco
12-20-2012, 9:27 PM
A trust is scary IMO. If its past jan 2014 alone and your kids are under 18 then they cannot own them. Someone will probably have to hold them until they reach 18. What if laws change by then? What about an AR ban by then? It ain't worth chance. Give them to them now while it is 100% legal. Just my opinion and it's cheaper way to go.

odysseus
12-20-2012, 9:35 PM
This is a good idea, I am going to produce a letter and have it notarized as mentioned.

Eldraque
12-20-2012, 11:58 PM
HSC has a unique number on it that is registered to the holder by name and CA ID/drivers license number. I've never seen the interfamily transfer form, but I'm sure there's a place on there for the HSC number if required, and DOJ would undoubtably verify it.

ok.

liberty
12-30-2012, 6:58 PM
The problem with transferring them to the children is that the banned guns will only survive the children's life, and not thereafter, since they will not be able to transfer them after the ban.

I've been researching the Trust approach myself this week, since you should be able to add your entire family as owners, thereby giving them full ownership of the weapons now, and after my death. And being owners of the Trust, they could add their own children thereafter, and the Trust survives through generations... so in theory, the banned guns should survive the life of the Trust and the guns themselves.

bigbully
12-30-2012, 9:33 PM
Please post more info if you figure out exactly what needs to be done. I'm very interested in what this entails and cost.

welchy
12-30-2012, 9:54 PM
Very interested. Need more info.

sseric75
12-30-2012, 10:00 PM
TAG for more info

HatersLOVEme : )
12-30-2012, 10:09 PM
Yes, you can.

There is no age limit to receive a long gun until 2014.

It's only 'grandfathering' now if a grandfather gives it. Grandfathering is a shorthand for 'the law we pass today will affect new stuff only - all the existing stuff is unaffected', for whatever stuff the law is about.

So wait am I reading this right you can do inter family transfer of a long gun to your child of any age and without paperwork till 2014 ? I thought that ended in 1993 or was that just handguns ?!?

InFamous20
12-30-2012, 10:14 PM
So am I SOOL (no kids)?

mosinnagantm9130
12-30-2012, 10:24 PM
So wait am I reading this right you can do inter family transfer of a long gun to your child of any age and without paperwork till 2014 ? I thought that ended in 1993 or was that just handguns ?!?

Long guns only.

MotoriousRacing
12-30-2012, 10:39 PM
can you 'legally' pass on a AR (fully legal bought in 2012) to my child? i would like them to have it of there is some bann on 'assult types' and a bann on grandfathering in weapons. Would it be considered 'grandfathering' if you give it to them now?

Yes, you can.

There is no age limit to receive a long gun until 2014.

It's only 'grandfathering' now if a grandfather gives it. Grandfathering is a shorthand for 'the law we pass today will affect new stuff only - all the existing stuff is unaffected', for whatever stuff the law is about.

Please verify if a stripped lower could be transfered. Thanks.

shellyzsweet
12-30-2012, 11:04 PM
Please verify if a stripped lower could be transfered. Thanks.

Stripped lower (unless you took extra, what I would call advanced steps to make it a pistol AR lower) is by definition a rifle and classified as a long gun.

So yes, stripped lower 99% of the time is classified as a rifle.

(there are some sneaky awesome people out there with AR pistols, but that is a very specific process you have to go through to achieve that)

shellyzsweet
12-30-2012, 11:06 PM
I'd also like more information regarding a firearms trust, being as I have no children yet and would love to have a way to ensure that my guns can be passed down to them and then grandchildren, and guns that my dad has that are willed to me that I will get one day and want to pass on as well.

mt4design
12-30-2012, 11:30 PM
I like the idea of placing a noterized letter away for my son.

But, his second Amendment rights are already protected in the Bill of Rights and restrictions upon the infringement of those rights is defined.

If that right, enumerated, passed by two thirds of both houses, signed by the president and ratified by three quarters of the states is not worth the parchment it is printed on then what good will a noterized letter do me or my son?

If the government chooses to act without regard for the law they are sworn to protect, they surely will have no regard for the law when it comes to my private property whether it be gold, land or the arms I acquire to protect them and my family.

odysseus
12-30-2012, 11:50 PM
If the government chooses to act without regard for the law they are sworn to protect, they surely will have no regard for the law when it comes to my private property whether it be gold, land or the arms I acquire to protect them and my family.

Sadly, it is we the people that are doing this to ourselves. We have consistently been voting in representatives, law, and regulation which infringe on our inherent rights to property and free use of. Firearms is of course the easy ticket to sell from fear and lies, but private property rights have been under attack for a long time, and currently the swell of using class-ism as the slaughter goat to the temple is to disguise further infringement to sell to the masses.

These are all attacks on individual rights, which in government means individual power, which for collectivist minded people is the enemy of their "progress".

Many on here on Calguns are ignorant of the concepts and only catch on to the emotional rhetoric that are vehicles to further limits on our freedom. You see it all all the time, they are emotionally entwined on a social issue or sold a batch about an emotional issue to steam their emotional anger erroneously, and are used by collectivists for their support. It is maddening how easy people sell off their reasoning.