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View Full Version : i consider this a must have for long term survival...


IrishPirate
12-17-2012, 10:26 PM
anyone who doesn't plan on roaming around like Denzel Washington in Book of Eli after a SHTF scenario and instead decides to dig in and survive homestead style is definitely going to have to grow their own food. As we know, crop rotation is a vital part of ensuring years of sustainable farm land. Unless you have (and can adequately defend) at least a solid acre of usable land, it's likely that you'll end up depleting the soil and needing to supplement it with nutrients.

Since the local feed store or Ace Hardware probably wont be operational anymore, you're going to need some way to create your own fertilizer. Compost isn't your only option, but it's definitely your best bet. Only problem is that compost piles take up a lot of usable space, they tend to smell, and they take a while to produce viable fertilizer.

So, as a quicker, non-smelling, compact way to achieve nutrient rich fertilizer that guarantees larger crops with better yield, I suggest: A Worm Bin...

They can be made out of anything and can be as big or as small as you want them to be:
http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/images/step6.gif
http://www.naturesfootprint.com/wp-content/themes/twentyten/images/worm%20bin.png
http://www.ecorazzi.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/giant-worm-bin.jpg

Just throw your veggie scraps and anything else you can compost into the bin and let the worms break it down. Worm compost is some of the richest fertilizer you can get, and it can be mixed in with regular soil so that even a little goes a very long way. And, unlike a compost pile you end up with something called "worm tea". Basically it's a liquid substance that is a nutrient powerhouse. You can water it down and add it to your soil as a supplement between fertilization, or you can spray it on your plants for use as a pesticide.

Worms can be ordered online and shipped to your house for around $30-$35 for about 1,000 (small red worms...nightcrawlers don't do as well in smaller bins). Also, the worms replicate every 90 days, so your initial 1,000 worms will quickly become 2,000, then 4,000, then 8,000, etc.......basically, you'll be producing top quality fertilizer quicker and you'll be able to add worms directly to your garden to ensure it remains even healthier (or use them as fishing bait, or food for chickens, etc.)

My brother has been doing this for a while with some Styrofoam ice chests in his garage. His garden is one of the best I've seen. In a 150sq.ft. area he grows so many crops that he supplies 6 of his neighbors with Easter egg baskets full of vegetables each week, and that's what he has left over after he feeds himself and his girlfriend.

Here are some links for more info:
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/organics/worms/WormSupply.htm
http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/easywormbin.htm
http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/Redwormsedit.htm

Do a quick google or youtube search on worm bins for more info

OIFVet03
12-17-2012, 10:36 PM
Thanks for the tip. That's awesome Next season my wife and I will start growing our own crops so that will definitely come in handy.

Steve_In_29
12-18-2012, 6:55 AM
Plus according to a recent Dooms Day Preppers episode worms make great emergency rations. :D

Claybone
12-18-2012, 8:51 AM
Well there ya go I learned someting new, Thanks

IrishPirate
12-18-2012, 9:22 AM
Plus according to a recent Dooms Day Preppers episode worms make great emergency rations. :D

i like 'em with garlic in a red wine and butter reduction on a bed of wild rice....

KevinB
12-18-2012, 10:13 AM
Being married to a master gardener that doesn't like to use commercial fertilizer I have seen it all when it comes to compost and worms.

She stirs her compost pile with a tractor. Haven't bought a worm in 25 years.

Those little units really work well as long as you don't let them get too hot. We have had problems in the past with ours started steaming. They can get a little ripe so don't get them too close to the house.

IrishPirate
12-18-2012, 2:59 PM
Being married to a master gardener that doesn't like to use commercial fertilizer I have seen it all when it comes to compost and worms.

She stirs her compost pile with a tractor. Haven't bought a worm in 25 years.

Those little units really work well as long as you don't let them get too hot. We have had problems in the past with ours started steaming. They can get a little ripe so don't get them too close to the house.

thanks for the first hand input! My brother has told me that using the styrofoam ice chests helps keep the worms from getting too cold since the microbial breakdown of food generates some decent heat, and it helps trap the warm air inside, and keep the cool air outside. I can see it getting too hot though if you left it out in the sun, or had it in an area that gets in the upper 90's to 100's during the summer.

hopefully though, you can attest that unless heat is an issue, they don't smell bad at all...my wife is a bit turned off by the idea because she thinks it will stink up our garage, even though my brother has assured her that his doesn't smell at all.

nothinghere2c
12-18-2012, 3:02 PM
learn something new every day. Cheers.

Maltese Falcon
12-18-2012, 3:03 PM
I guess it would also help if you have arable land to grow stuff on lol. I live on the hillside, pretty much rock. :(

Good idea though, thanks for the heads up.

.

IrishPirate
12-18-2012, 3:06 PM
here's a testimonial from Worm Fancy:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_13oPW7YVuwQ/TARF0DSvsZI/AAAAAAAAABc/ENl8fi69g3Y/s320/comparison.JPG
This season I wanted to sprout my own plants with vermicompost but I couldn’t find seeds for the yellow squash variety I wanted so I decided to just buy some plants. Once I had my plants home I decided to plant the garden and the difference between the growth rates in the plants germinated with vermicompost vs. the store bought plants is so obvious this picture says it all.

The zucchini on the left was planted the same week I bought the yellow squash on the right. The zucchini is greener and so much bigger despite being weeks younger. No more pony packs for me, there is obviously no comparison.


healthier plants from seed that were planted at the same time as store bought packs....need I say any more???

KevinB
12-18-2012, 4:00 PM
I wouldn't want a composter in the garage. They smell.

----------kevin--------

Solid Foundation
12-18-2012, 4:19 PM
I'd be interested in seeing how the styrofoam box worked out.
I tried one of the plastic ones and that went well for one season. When winter hit and we had sub 40s overnight the worms didn't make it.

IrishPirate
12-18-2012, 9:01 PM
I wouldn't want a composter in the garage. They smell.

----------kevin--------

interesting....according to my brother and several youtube vids they don't smell at all....maybe it depends on the type of container, or on how warm they get. guess i'll find out when i start mine.

I'd be interested in seeing how the styrofoam box worked out.
I tried one of the plastic ones and that went well for one season. When winter hit and we had sub 40s overnight the worms didn't make it.

well, when they are full of ice you can't really feel the temperature difference on the outside so they would probably hold temp pretty well on the inside. Just depends on how many air holes you have in the styrofoam that contribute to your heat loss.

KevinB
12-18-2012, 9:35 PM
Okay, let me qualify that. We have lots of animals. Chickens, goats, pigs, and cows, so we use a lot of aged manure in our composting.

When it comes to gardens and abundance, my neighbors and friends won't answer the door when we show up. Never had anyone turn down fresh maters and eggs though.

Can't wait till May for a BLT made with fresh ripe maters and crispy bacon.

IrishPirate
12-18-2012, 10:03 PM
Okay, let me qualify that. We have lots of animals. Chickens, goats, pigs, and cows, so we use a lot of aged manure in our composting.

When it comes to gardens and abundance, my neighbors and friends won't answer the door when we show up. Never had anyone turn down fresh maters and eggs though.

Can't wait till May for a BLT made with fresh ripe maters and crispy bacon.

ahhhh.....got it!

guitar-nut
12-30-2012, 11:22 PM
Thanks for the cool info! The woman and I will actually be looking into using worms for fertilizer production.

G lock
01-01-2013, 1:12 AM
If you want an even faster method, also consider black soldier fly composting (then feeding grubs to chickens or tilapia). The advantage of worm bins is that RWW are great sources of protein and can be readily consumed in the event of no food

wjc
01-03-2013, 1:14 AM
Good stuff!

That reminds me...I need to buy a Bible.