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laabstract
12-11-2012, 9:27 PM
I am in the process of building B.O.B's for the family (1 year old daughter my wife and myself) and one of the walls I hit was what to pack for wet weather?

1st Option was get a small pup tent that we could all cram into.

2nd Option is to get every one each their own SOL Escape Bivvy or Goretex Military Bivy.

3rd would be Military style Ponchos and poncho liners

I am just curious what other people chose for their wet weather systems in the Bug Out Bags.

wheels
12-11-2012, 9:34 PM
I've got an MSR trekker wing - basically a lightweight tarp

wjc
12-11-2012, 10:22 PM
I have a tarp, a tube tent, and poncho.

I also have some clear plastic and some Hefty bags which can be used for tents, sleeping bags, rain gear, or a solar still.

It's only me and I've used them before so I'm used to using them.

oceanrider
12-11-2012, 10:25 PM
just poncho

speedrrracer
12-12-2012, 7:29 AM
A thread on wet weather suggestions is a great idea.

Shelter thoughts: Tarp on top, separate tent. You can get tents with built-in rain flys, but a separate tarp, a foot or more above the tent, keeps the noise level down better than a rain fly. Also, redundancy.

Make sure the tarp under your tent is angled to let any water which collects run off.

Make sure your tent isn't going to be located in an area which will become a big puddle or small creek...

For sure everyone needs their own poncho / rain gear for when they go outside. Ponchos are great for, among other things, going to the bathroom in the pouring rain...and as has been mentioned many times, don't pack tp, pack wipes. TP + water == useless mess. Wipes + water == wetter wipes, but job still gets done!

Since our BOL is a boat, our BOBs are Seal Line waterproof sacks. Totally recommend the Seal Line ILBE Sack 56, and I can vouch for it maintaining the contents dry even after a 500 meter ocean swim. If your scenario calls for lots of water, give it some serious consideration, if only as a pack liner...

mrboma
12-12-2012, 9:24 AM
I am still on the fence but have narrowed it down to one of the two following dry sleeping options:

Hennessy Hammock: Survivor Asym Universal Camo (http://hennessyhammock.com/catalog/specs/survivor_universal_camo/)

http://hennessyhammock.com/images/uploads/product_photos/surv-univ-680w.jpg

Clark NX-250 Jungle Hammock (http://www.junglehammock.com/store/product.php?productid=44&cat=0&page=1&featured)

http://www.backpacking.net/images/clarkjunglehammock.jpg

For less than 4 pounds you are off the wet ground and dry for the night.
Regards,
Mike

NotEnufGarage
12-12-2012, 9:25 AM
GHB, I have a couple disposable ponchos. For my BOB/INCH I have those, plus a waterproof windbreaker.

ZombieZoo
12-12-2012, 9:43 AM
I'd have some family fun "building skilz" with the large trash bag system.

Certain minor tweaks make diff between great and lousy "trash bag poncho", like just how much to cut neck hole 'forward' etc. Use smaller bags, with "roll splice" to make arms and legs.


Make tent by cutting bags into largest "flats", then "splice" those by rolling the edges together around a stick of some sort. That makes a water proof 'ridge'.

I saw some demonstration of all this in about 6th grade when we 'crashed' some hippie encampment in the woods. I seemed pretty cool and the skills were transferable to any sheet material.

Cnynrat
12-12-2012, 9:47 AM
We carry 3-day BOB/Get home bags in each of our vehicles. Since at any given time it may be both my wife & I that are in the vehicle, I tried to build each to support both of us.

I put two of the SOL Bivvy's in each bag, along with a two person SOL emergency blanket. I've also got raingear in each bag - one good rain jacket and a poncho. I'm looking to survive, not necessarily be comfortable.

There are two primary scenarios I'm planning for. One is we get the big killer earthquake when were away from home (we both work 20-25 miles away from home). In that event the chances are my wife and I will not be together when it happens, so the bags will likely only need to support one person. The other is we are out in our 4x4 and have some sort of emergency. In that instance the bags would need to support two, but we would also have other supplies and equipment to work with in addition to the BOB.

Here's a tip from a fellow off-roader - it's probably a good idea to head out some weekend and spend the night in the wilderness with only the stuff in your BOB. Figure out what you are missing, and maybe what's in there that isn't so important.

ElvenSoul
12-12-2012, 9:55 AM
One of the most comfortable hammocks made

http://wildernesslogics.com/Snipe-Snipe.htm

ElvenSoul
12-12-2012, 11:57 AM
Of course some people can get by with little to nothing.

Hiking Legend Grandma Gatewood only used a old shower curtain as she walked our Nations Trails.

NotEnufGarage
12-12-2012, 12:41 PM
I am still on the fence but have narrowed it down to one of the two following dry sleeping options:

Hennessy Hammock: Survivor Asym Universal Camo (http://hennessyhammock.com/catalog/specs/survivor_universal_camo/)

http://hennessyhammock.com/images/uploads/product_photos/surv-univ-680w.jpg

Clark NX-250 Jungle Hammock (http://www.junglehammock.com/store/product.php?productid=44&cat=0&page=1&featured)

http://www.backpacking.net/images/clarkjunglehammock.jpg

For less than 4 pounds you are off the wet ground and dry for the night.
Regards,
Mike

Way too heavy... 4lbs is 1/2 gallon of water or a couple days worth of food. For bug out, I'll rely on finding someplace dry enough to sleep, if that's a neccessity at the time. I don't forsee setting up anything that will let me grab an 8 hour sleep. More than likely, it'll be an hour here and there after establishing the safety of a given area.

mrboma
12-12-2012, 1:01 PM
Way too heavy... 4lbs is 1/2 gallon of water or a couple days worth of food. For bug out, I'll rely on finding someplace dry enough to sleep, if that's a neccessity at the time. I don't forsee setting up anything that will let me grab an 8 hour sleep. More than likely, it'll be an hour here and there after establishing the safety of a given area.

NotEnuf,
I see your point of view but respectfully disagree. Here's why...


I plan on the complete pack weighing 40 lbs
IMHO 10% of that weight spent on a water proof / off ground sleep system seems justified
They are very quick to deploy and even quicker to re-pack
They are very compact


That being said the OP was asking for wet weather gear to pack in his family BOB's. IMO a "BOB" needs some type of sleeping system, where as a "GHB" would not. One you are taking everything you have on your person and leaving the area. The other you are simply trying to get back to your sleep system (your home).

Without knowing the intended terrain for said bug-out a hammock (or any sleep system) may not be needed, such as in a more rural environment. Again I understand where you are coming from, just thought I would explain the thought process behind mine.

Regards,
Mike

kaligaran
12-12-2012, 1:45 PM
I love the Clark Jungle Hammock and I agree with Mike's comments on it.
They can be setup just about anywhere. I don't sleep as well on the ground and didn't want to carry a sleep pad or anything like that. Plus any ground system leaves an imprint where the hammock doesn't leave a mark.

I have the Clark NX150 with the XL tarp. It weighs in at 4 pounds with tarp. Now this is heavy for a hammock. There are some much lighter weight ones. I chose the heavier clark for a few reasons that aren't really the point of this post. :)
There's also a double capacity hammock for 2 people to sleep in.

In comparison, the weight of military ponchos are almost 2 pounds for a single one. And that doesn't really give you any ground cover. If you do the 2 poncho setup, you're already over the weight of a hammock setup.
Tube tents are usually about 1.5-3 pounds as well and don't give much cover in a storm nor enough for multiple people. Full tents are usually double that at least.

Depends on what you accomplish, a hammock is a very viable option.

Here's a pic of my Clark in action on my last camping trip before putting up the tarp:
http://i1171.photobucket.com/albums/r560/kaligaran/gear/IMG_1891.jpg

ElvenSoul
12-12-2012, 5:21 PM
Put this on the main BOB Thread

Repost it here

http://www.plasticbags.bz/cartbag.asp

150 Gallon Trash Bags.

Decoligny
12-13-2012, 10:14 AM
Whatever you get, be sure you have a way to test it out. The first use of any survival equipment should not be when your life depends upon it.

Set up a wet weather camp in your back yard and set up a couple of sprinklers to see how dry you can stay over night. Or even better try setting up your camp with the sprinklers already on.

slagusmc
12-13-2012, 11:20 AM
goretex clothing and footwear will keep you warm and dry even on the move...tents are luxuries, bivy is certainly a comfort..

ElvenSoul
12-13-2012, 11:31 AM
I bought one of these two years ago only to find out I was too tall for (6'5").

http://www.trailspace.com/gear/six-moon-designs/gatewood-cape/review/22763/

I gave it to my GF Daughter....she loves it!

Way better than a Poncho Tarp as it makes a complete solo tent. Add the Net Tent to keep insects out.

Onetyme
12-21-2012, 7:39 PM
I like the Clark and have it on my wish list. Currently, I have a tarp with and a military poncho/liner setup.

johnny1290
12-22-2012, 12:26 AM
I have precious little for rain. I'll have to do with my trash bags and bivy bag. No two ways about it, it will make for a miserable experieence to get rained on.

I have a get home bag though, so it's good enough. Honestly without a sleeping pad of some kind it just plain sucks sleeping on the ground. People do it all the time, but I'm not used to it and don't expect much sleep.

Librarian
12-22-2012, 1:17 AM
Have you hammock-users tried them in the cold?

My admittedly ancient experience with a low-quality hammock showed a lot of conductive heat loss (and I dislike sleeping in hammocks - always feel like I'm going to fall out).

johnny1290
12-22-2012, 10:42 AM
Have you hammock-users tried them in the cold?

My admittedly ancient experience with a low-quality hammock showed a lot of conductive heat loss (and I dislike sleeping in hammocks - always feel like I'm going to fall out).

From what I've read, hammocks are freezing. Good in the heat, but bundle up if it's cold out! The research I've done says theres a lot of emphasis put on hammock liners and whatnot to insulate.

I expect to freeze(travel light, freeze at night) in a get-home situation. I can suffer a few days. Bugging out, I guess it depends on how long you're planning to stay bugged.

Mighty_
12-22-2012, 3:23 PM
contractor refuse bags, the extra thick mil ones, make a great LDE backup for poncho, pack cover, and a dozen other uses. i have half a roll in my BO kit.

kb58
12-22-2012, 8:16 PM
Might want to also weigh the odds of how likely it is to rain where you plan on being. Around my area there's no point in carrying the weight of rain gear.

acegunnr
12-22-2012, 9:02 PM
Might want to also weigh the odds of how likely it is to rain where you plan on being. Around my area there's no point in carrying the weight of rain gear.

Agree- 95% of the time, my rain gear just stays in the bottom of my back pack.

Go with Dry Ducks or Frogg Toggs for cheap $20 - $40, lightweight rain gear. Available at Sports Authority, Walmart and most sporting goods stores.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/driducks_rain_gear.html

ElvenSoul
12-22-2012, 9:50 PM
Game Changer

Molly Mac Gear Survival Bivy Hammock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uM75rVMWxQ&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Main page
http://www.mollymacpack.com/hammock.html

Someone wanted to know about extreme cold
Underquilt
Winter Hammock Sock
Top Quilt
All these things make it possible to go bellow 0
On Youtube Shug Emery has a whole bunch of winter hammock camping vids.

I love War Bonnet Hammocks, that shelf inside fits a 1911 nice :)

dieselpower
12-23-2012, 4:50 PM
another vote for industrial garbage bags...at least 3mil thick. You can also get a can of spray glue to seal them together. I saw this once but never had the time to look into what it was. It was some sort of hobby fabric glue that works for thick plastic as well.