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mike_the_wino
11-28-2012, 9:13 PM
Had a run in with a food slicer on Thanksgiving.

food slicer = 1, mike = 0

But I got to thinking about what is a fair amount of supplies to stock for a family of 4 in case of a large scale emergency where the local hospital is overwhelmed with more serious casualities and what can I handle? Due to playing with sharp/ pointy things on a regular basis I have what I thought was a robust aid kit. Additionally, I have "first aid kits" scattered around in various places (cars, camping gear). And I have patched myself up enough to feel pretty good about wound care. I have stocked in betadine, rubbing alcohol, gauze of different sizes/ types (patches, tubular, non-stick, etc.), steristrips and various bits.

I think I need more disinfectants (volume, not types), gauze (number of and types), adhesive tape and gloves. And First Aid courses for the wife and I.

Don't forget first aid in stocking up. One relatively minor, but painful, reminder made me look at how well I was prepared in case of a large scale emergency.

llamatrnr
11-28-2012, 9:33 PM
I had an uncle ( a butcher) who backed into his slicer one time. He wasn't very seriously hurt, but got a little behind on his orders for a few hours . . .

mike_the_wino
11-28-2012, 9:35 PM
oooohhh, that's bad. So very bad.

heypal
11-28-2012, 9:59 PM
Also an emergency Dental kit. since we're talking just in case.

mike_the_wino
11-28-2012, 10:05 PM
Link?

As to medical supplies, I was thinking an earthquake. Cuts, slices, and sprains. Not quite up for breaks but I would like to make sure no one dies from sepsis on my watch.

OliveDrab
11-28-2012, 10:10 PM
Mike, have you considered taking a CPR/first aid class? Although it can be a little dry sometimes, if you pay attention you can learn a lot of skills on first aid that you can put in your tool box for future use. Where are you located? I could possibly recommend some

Ninety
11-28-2012, 10:21 PM
I ran into a similar situation where a neighbor came over with his son that had a wound.. needed some gauze and for the life of me I couldn't find any.. In my motorhome I have a good supply of pain relievers , bandages first aid kits .. but I too would like to stock up.. My aunt was a nurse and I always had her bring me home some little things.. one thing i remember was sample anti bacterial , iodine wipes and that really nice tape that sticks to itself.

I would love to get some quick clot, gauzes, iodine.. all the stuff needed to quickly clean and stop a possible life threatening injury. The kits sold in stores are very pricey and commercialized.. I gotta believe that one could put together a much better kit for the same price. Quick Clot .. that stuff is awesome.

Ninety
11-28-2012, 10:22 PM
I ran into a similar situation where a neighbor came over with his son that had a wound.. needed some gauze and for the life of me I couldn't find any.. In my motorhome I have a good supply of pain relievers , bandages first aid kits .. but I too would like to stock up.. My aunt was a nurse and I always had her bring me home some little things.. one thing i remember was sample anti bacterial , iodine wipes and that really nice tape that sticks to itself.

I would love to get some quick clot, gauzes, iodine.. all the stuff needed to quickly clean and stop a possible life threatening injury. The kits sold in stores are very pricey and commercialized.. I gotta believe that one could put together a much better kit for the same price. Quick Clot .. that stuff is awesome.

taladeganite
11-28-2012, 11:09 PM
I have a descent BLS kit consisting of a good supply the important essentials, but I sure could see a use for some of the suggestions mentioned above. ie.. some suture kits, dental kits. I've heard you can get some of this stuff cheap from online veterinary supply sites.

madland
11-29-2012, 4:16 AM
I keep what I feel is a pretty decent kit stored in a used, but in good condition Vortex hard case I picked up at a surplus store for $50. I like that when we go camping, even though I have a FAK in our trailer, there is more stuff in this so I just load it in the trailer as well. In addition to the normal stuff you find in a decent FAK, (Bandages,alcohol wipes,disinfectant wipes,single use meds,etc) I have added:
1-Bottle of Alcohol
1-Bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide
1-Sam Splint
2-Saline Solution
2-Eyewash
1-Dental Kit
1-EMT Shears(Scissors)
1-Snakebite Kit (Don't know how well these work, and hope I never have to find out..but camping in the desert..I'd rather have it and not need it instead of the other way)
4-Ice packs
Anti-itch cream for Poison Oak/Ivy/bug bites,etc
Burn cream/gel
Moleskin/blister kit
Quickclot
Extra Ace Bandages
Extra 4x4s/Bandaids/Gauze/Tape..Albertson Mkt near me recently closed so when they had inventory blowout I cleared out a bunch of the first stuff for a ridiculously cheap price!!!
**GLOVES** (A bunch..especially if we're talking about an earthquake kit..I keep a ziploc bag full..estimate around 80 pairs), plus what I keep in my truck and trailer FAK
OTC meds of all the standard stuff..Tylenol/Motrin/Imodium/Cough n Cold meds/Allergy meds/Nasal spray/etc
Extra sunscreen/chapstick
Anti-chaffing cream
Foot powder
Baby powder
Extra Fem pads for the wife(can also be used for a heavy bleeding wound)
Pen,pencil,small pad of paper in a ziploc bag for writing down any important info
Small flashlight
Nail clipper kit(finger,toe,tweezers)
Balmex
Hand sanitizer/wipes
Clorox wipes
Cheap hospital face masks
Travel size soap/shampoo/toothbrush kits
I know I'm missing stuff off the top of my head, and I know it sounds like a lot or possible overkill, but its a family FAK/Hygiene kit,and the way I see it..it contains all the things we would use normally, and even though we have most of this stuff with us in the trailer for trips to the desert, if we were at home for example, and got displaced due to some kind of evac (major gas leak,haz-mat,power outage,etc) I can grab that case and we'll have all these items with us. There is a lot of first aid stuff especially in case of an earthquake.. which is my biggest concern living in SoCal.
New addition coming next month so I also need to make a new Baby-BOB for the little guy.
My .02

NaClAddict
11-29-2012, 6:39 AM
Coban-the non adhesive tape that sticks to itself is priceless. Once upon a time EMS workers used to pride themselves on their bandaging skills, or at least I did. Now you just wrap away and it all looks clean.

Besides band aids, gauze, etc. I've stockpiled some sulfa based antibiotics. Electrolyte powder. Also the burn treatment in the aerosol can. I've heard that you can use it to cover any bad open wound. A handle of cheap vodka. And lots of sanitizing materials. My feeling is that unsanitary conditions will claim just as many lives as injuries caused by trauma.

Also, work gloves, boots, safety goggles, and basic prying and cutting tools. If I'm going to have to do extrication work I want my personal protective equipment.

In regards to iodine. I've been told by an ER surgeon that it is only for cleaning skin w/o open wounds and sterilizing equipment if necessary. Iodine will actually kill tissue, making suturing more difficult and exacerbate open wounds.

speedrrracer
11-29-2012, 6:57 AM
Having a well-stocked first aid kit is great, but if you really want to be prepared for the absence of ready medical care, you are better served by modifying your behavior *now*.

Not a lot of people consider the origins of sayings like "Slow and steady wins the race" and "nice and easy" but these were life-saving bits of advice hundreds of years ago before we all assumed an ambulance would be rushing us to a waiting emergency room within minutes of a screw-up.

Playing with sharps and rushing around are luxuries which only exist because we all assume that ambulance will be there for us. If the SHTF that assumption may well be invalid, and your behavior could then kill you.

I don't care if you have a warehouse full of first aid, nick an artery and you may be dead without surgical care. If we assume, as mentioned in the OP, that care is not available after the SHTF, then controlling your behavior is the only thing that will save your life.

Practice controlling yourself now, because if it's not a habit before the SHTF, it sure as heck won't become a habit after the SHTF.

Californio
11-29-2012, 8:06 AM
I have a Spud 7 in Orange full of first-aid supplies with and inventory sheet and expiration dates, for Earthquakes.

http://www.mtmcase-gard.com/products/camping/dry-boxes-spud6.html


I started with a base like this,

http://www.costco.ca/320-pc.-Deluxe-Office-First-Aid-Kit-.product.10294632.html

Customized the Spud 7 for what I wanted, I like the fact that the box is water tight and bug proof.

It has a three pack of Costco saline eye wash, N100's, gloves and other stuff.

The top opening has an LED light, 2x glasses and other quick need items.

It's grab and go. Each vehicle has a small Sports First Aid kit as well.

heypal
11-29-2012, 9:05 AM
Link?

As to medical supplies, I was thinking an earthquake. Cuts, slices, and sprains. Not quite up for breaks but I would like to make sure no one dies from sepsis on my watch.

I totally agree on the first aid, but you can learn (I plan to take a course soon) to put a break in line and help the injured. I think dental care is one of those things that, like a foot or back injury, could easily lead to bigger problems and is often overlooked. Here's a link:

http://www.amazon.com/Travelers-Supply-Emergency-Dental-Kit/dp/B001MA316C

LCU1670
11-29-2012, 9:20 AM
Suggest: http://www.darkangelmedical.com/About.php, keep one in the house, one in the car. Also, always have one near-by when shooting!

Training is important. There are a lot of things you can do with whats around you in an emergency, its first aid. When it comes to first aid, better dirty and alive-then clean and dead. Meaning, use what you have, can take care of the infection later. Versus, trying to be sterile and the patient dies!

EFMB, Badged: 1992

adrenalinemedic
11-29-2012, 12:32 PM
+1 to LCU 1670. Get training.

Take an EMT course, or better an WEMT course. Knowledge is power, and knowing what you need to do means you can improvise with what's around you. WEMT especially emphasizes this.

I was a medic, medic instructor, an EMT instructor, and still am a firefighter, and I have enough medical supplies to run a small clinic out of my storage unit. There are a lot of whiz-bang things I have in my personal trauma kits that could help me save myself or someone else, but I also have the training and experience to know how to use it, and more importantly, when not to. Examples of these items would be HemCons, Crich kits, CATs, 14ga NCD catheters, IV sets, FAST-1 IOs, and EpiPens.

That being said, a lot of people get hung up on the 'cool stuff' when in most cases, it really is the basics (a **** ton of gauze and a lot of direct pressure) that saves lives. I learned from a former 18D (my team chief as a medic instructor) that if you can have nothing else, make sure you have 2" silk tape and lots of Kerlix. There isn't a whole lot of trauma you can't treat with those two things and some quick thinking.

Oh, and get training.

Keep things simple, and economical. If you can afford to have Combat Gauze and SOF-TT's sprinkled around like a squirrel hiding nuts, awesome. But if you can have one super nice kit, or five decent kits for the same price, think about where you can put those five kits (home, office, car, garage, RV) so that they're accessible when you need them.

Did I mention, get training?

WOLFPACK117
11-29-2012, 12:43 PM
I can put some First Aid kit and Get Home Bag together. Let me know if you're interested.

mike_the_wino
11-29-2012, 1:23 PM
Practice controlling yourself now, because if it's not a habit before the SHTF, it sure as heck won't become a habit after the SHTF.
Totally agree. Mrs. wino has all ready announced that I am getting a cut glove for Christmas. I am not normally fast and loose with sharp bits but I failed basic safety on Thanksgiving when I got the owie.

I had First Aid training and will be getting a refresher through work shortly, so I feel better about that. That plus years of practical experience make me feel a little better but I can't imagine one could be "too prepared".

Lots of good tips for additional items in my first aid kit.

Thanks all for the input.

ElvenSoul
11-29-2012, 1:48 PM
The sell ready made emt kits

97F1504RAD
11-29-2012, 2:19 PM
I have a few of the Adventure Medicals kits that i keep on hand but have also added various items to them. They come pretty complete and you can buy them from the very basic to the Guide Outfitter size.

http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/

jyo
11-29-2012, 3:09 PM
Well, I learned that most homes lack the stuff needed to treat larger wounds the hard way. I was walking one of my Pitbull rescue dogs (80lbs pure muscle) when she decided to suddenly check something out---pulled me down onto the pavement---scraped the shiit out of one of my hands and several other spots. Limped home, cleaned wounds and applied Neosporin and found out my supply of bandaging materials was sadly lacking---this has been attended to and now I know I needed more and better medical suppies. Everything healed well...

xgi1991
11-29-2012, 3:18 PM
+1 to LCU 1670. Get training.

Take an EMT course, or better an WEMT course. Knowledge is power, and knowing what you need to do means you can improvise with what's around you. WEMT especially emphasizes this.

I was a medic, medic instructor, an EMT instructor, and still am a firefighter, and I have enough medical supplies to run a small clinic out of my storage unit. There are a lot of whiz-bang things I have in my personal trauma kits that could help me save myself or someone else, but I also have the training and experience to know how to use it, and more importantly, when not to. Examples of these items would be HemCons, Crich kits, CATs, 14ga NCD catheters, IV sets, FAST-1 IOs, and EpiPens.

That being said, a lot of people get hung up on the 'cool stuff' when in most cases, it really is the basics (a **** ton of gauze and a lot of direct pressure) that saves lives. I learned from a former 18D (my team chief as a medic instructor) that if you can have nothing else, make sure you have 2" silk tape and lots of Kerlix. There isn't a whole lot of trauma you can't treat with those two things and some quick thinking.

Oh, and get training.

Keep things simple, and economical. If you can afford to have Combat Gauze and SOF-TT's sprinkled around like a squirrel hiding nuts, awesome. But if you can have one super nice kit, or five decent kits for the same price, think about where you can put those five kits (home, office, car, garage, RV) so that they're accessible when you need them.

Did I mention, get training?

^^^this x 1000
And just in case he forgot it, get trained. I buy alot of kit from here http://www.chinookmed.com/ but things like gauze etc, stock up from your local CVS and get alot of it. Make sure you have a look at the Chinook dental kit as well, a bit more advanced than what you might find on Amazon.

GunGreg2107
11-29-2012, 4:47 PM
I took a long look at the very expensive pre made kits that came in fancy tacticool bags and got on amazon with a list of the included supplies and bought everything for about 10% of cost of pre assembled kit. I keep various kits around house, trauma kit, basic snivel kit, kids kits ect. I keep a bag in the truck for various stuff as well as one designed for work and tailored both for what I thought I would need work is for dog bites, cuts ect car kit is basics with pain relievers sunscreen bug spray stuff I forget alot. jm 2cents

GunGreg2107
11-29-2012, 4:50 PM
just wanted to add that I advocate stocking things that you dont have the knowledge to use as you may have the oppourtunity to put them in the hands of someone qualified who can save yours or a family members life. I find that as i do this though I end up getting more and more training to use everything and now am pretty well versed in handling almost any situation from sprains,breaks,gs wounds,to suturing.

11HE9
11-29-2012, 9:19 PM
I have been trained in "First responder" emergency medicine (EMT cert. and Army "Combat life saver" course). I really need to put together a serious first aid kit (and keep my kids away from it). I have "better than the average Joe" first aid supplies, but nothing close to what I would like to have on hand.

mike_the_wino
11-29-2012, 9:43 PM
My next goal is learning sutures. I worked on a graveyard shift at a grocery store for 6 years when I was younger and I learned a lot about closing up slices and dices. Medical tape is awesome but duct tape works in a pinch as well. Also taught me about dealing with shock and recognizing when someone is on the edge.

adrenalinemedic
11-29-2012, 11:47 PM
just wanted to add that I advocate stocking things that you dont have the knowledge to use as you may have the oppourtunity to put them in the hands of someone qualified who can save yours or a family members life.

I advocate having more than sufficient quantities of supplies you can effectively use to save your life, or the lives of your loved ones... rather than spending space and money stocking useless-to-you supplies that will only be lifesaving on the off chance that someone more qualified just happens to be strolling along at the right place and time to help you.

But that's just me.

Dark Sky Solutions
11-30-2012, 5:40 AM
Mr. Wino, Glad you are doing better and your owie is fixing itself.

There is some good info in this thread. I would say the most important is to take a training course. Not to promote myself but everyone who wants to provide for their families in a situation where normal services are not available should get more training than what mom taught you. Chances are if normal services are not available, do to whatever reason, you will be working harder and performing more dangerous tasks you are not use to doing on a daily basis which can increase yours or a loved one's chance of serious injury/illness that you need to know how to treat, manage and assist during recuperation.

New first aid+ classes are going to be held starting after the new year down in San Diego. Keep your eye out for a post and PM if you have any questions.

billmaykafer
11-30-2012, 6:27 AM
put a couple tampax in first aid kit for wounds also. i also was a combat life saver. i have a army medic A bag just in case.

Taidaisher
11-30-2012, 6:46 AM
Pet Meds (http://www.1800petmeds.com/promo.jsp?CID=13152&PID=1000&MID=1435&DID=GMAIL.COM) Cyber week sales. I thought with the first aid stockpile discussions, you guys might be able to take advantage of this.

ElvenSoul
12-07-2012, 4:31 PM
Try thebuffshop.com

TheChief
12-07-2012, 4:52 PM
If one were to pickup a well rounded supply of antibiotics from Pet Meds...what would you get?

I am looking for a shopping list assuming you had nothing currently and cost was not a concern.

olhunter
12-07-2012, 6:25 PM
If one were to pickup a well rounded supply of antibiotics from Pet Meds...what would you get?

I am looking for a shopping list assuming you had nothing currently and cost was not a concern.

Good info and a list here -

http://www.truthistreason.net/guide-to-veterinary-drugs-for-human-consumption-post-shtf

Having it is one thing, knowing when and how to administer is the secret. There's links in his article about that, but I would research a second opinion. Then print it out and keep it near the drugs.

Some not only expire, but become dangerous when old. Tetracycline? I'd have to look it up, but you should too.

adrenalinemedic
12-16-2012, 1:15 PM
Just to rehash knowing the basics, I came across this:

"In 2010 the Navy conducted a comparison of Celox-A, ChitoFlex, WoundStat, and Combat Gauze hemostatic agents versus standard gauze dressing in control of hemorrhage in a swine model with penetrating trauma. They started with 80 swine and created complex groin injuries with a small penetrating wounds, followed by transection of the femoral vessel and 45 seconds of uncontrolled bleeding. Each animal received one of the above hemostatic agents, followed by 5 minutes of direct pressure and 500mL of Hextend over 30 minutes. They looked for initial hemostasis and incidence of re bleeding. Overall, no difference was found among agents with respect to initial hemostasis, rebleeding and survival. During this study standard untreated gauze performed similarly to the hemostatic agents tested. This supports the concept that proper wound packing and pressure may be more important than the use of a hemostatuc agent in small wounds with severe vascular trauma. It goes to show, the more basics you know the more advanced you are.

The study can be googled and is called, appropriately enough, "Comparison of Celox-A, ChitoFlex, WoundStat, and Combat Gauze Hemostatic Agents Versus Standard Gauze Dressing in Control of Hemorrhage in a Swine Model of Penetrating Trauma" by Lanny F. Littlejohn, MD, John J. Devlin, MD, Sara S. Kircher, Robert Lueken, MD, Michael R. Melia, MD, and Andrew S. Johnson, MD"

(emphasis added by me)

mindwip
12-16-2012, 3:15 PM
Shock. Treat for shock! Small to big wounds lead to shock and this can be worse then the wound.

I highly recommend a decent amk kit. I highly recommend a first responder course. First Responder training is about all you can do with out a bus or hospital and good drugs. I have taken emt and while good a lot of the added stuff would not suit a home situation without hospital access. Wilderness firtaid is good too.

L84CABO
12-27-2012, 6:05 PM
Overall I think it's cheaper to assemble a kit then to buy pre-made. Assuming you have the time. And you certainly end up with a greater supply of everything.

My main kit lives in my truck. Then again, I live alone and am either in the house (truck close by) or in the truck. But as I said, when you put together your own kit you end up with a fair amount of leftovers (refills) so that's all in the house if needed.

I would also recommend the Adventure Medical first aid book. There's no substitute for training. But this little book covers most of the basics.

http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Wilderness-Medicine-Adventure-Medical/dp/0965976807

Misc.
Med Bag
Space Blanket
Ammonia inhalants
Cold packs
Dental kit
The Extractor (Snake Bite Kit)
Sam Splint
Quik Clot

Wound Cleaning
Betadine 10% solution, 8 oz
Hand sanitizer
Alcohol pads
Gloves
Eye wash
Eye wash cups
triple antibiotic ointment
Hydrocortizone cream
Styptic powder/pencil
Vinegar
Applicators (Q-tips)
Tincture of benzoin swabs

Poison
Activated charcoal
Syrup of Ipecac

Bandages
Ace bandage 4" x 5.5 yds
Ace bandage 4" x 4.5 yds
Cohesive flexible bandage 2" x 5 yds
Triangular Bandage
Blood Stopper Trauma Dressing
Cinch Tight Trama Bandage
4x4 Sterile gauze pads
4x4 Sterile sponges
4x3 Sterile sponges
Fluff E (stretch) 4.5" x 4.1 yd sterile gauze rolls
3x4 sterile Telfa
Combine dressing
Sterile eye pads
Steri Strips 1/2" x 4"
Tape 1" x 10 yds (waterproof)
Mole Skin
Nu Skin

Burn Treatment
Aloe
Water Gel Burn Kit

Tools
Wilderness First Aid Book
Kelly forceps
Splinter forceps
Scalpal
CPR Mask
EMT Shears
Stethoscope/BP kit
Irrigation syringe
Syringes, needles, suture, IV Drip
Muzzle
Thermometer
Flashlight
Tourniquet

Medications
Motrin
Tylenol
Aspirin
Benadryl
Imodium
Kaopectate
Oral rehydration

Dark Sky Solutions
12-28-2012, 11:25 AM
Overall I think it's cheaper to assemble a kit then to buy pre-made. Assuming you have the time. And you certainly end up with a greater supply of everything.

My main kit lives in my truck. Then again, I live alone and am either in the house (truck close by) or in the truck. But as I said, when you put together your own kit you end up with a fair amount of leftovers (refills) so that's all in the house if needed.

I would also recommend the Adventure Medical first aid book. There's no substitute for training. But this little book covers most of the basics.

http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Wilderness-Medicine-Adventure-Medical/dp/0965976807

Misc.
Med Bag
Space Blanket
Ammonia inhalants
Cold packs
Dental kit
The Extractor (Snake Bite Kit)
Sam Splint
Quik Clot

Wound Cleaning
Betadine 10% solution, 8 oz
Hand sanitizer
Alcohol pads
Gloves
Eye wash
Eye wash cups
triple antibiotic ointment
Hydrocortizone cream
Styptic powder/pencil
Vinegar
Applicators (Q-tips)
Tincture of benzoin swabs

Poison
Activated charcoal
Syrup of Ipecac

Bandages
Ace bandage 4" x 5.5 yds
Ace bandage 4" x 4.5 yds
Cohesive flexible bandage 2" x 5 yds
Triangular Bandage
Blood Stopper Trauma Dressing
Cinch Tight Trama Bandage
4x4 Sterile gauze pads
4x4 Sterile sponges
4x3 Sterile sponges
Fluff E (stretch) 4.5" x 4.1 yd sterile gauze rolls
3x4 sterile Telfa
Combine dressing
Sterile eye pads
Steri Strips 1/2" x 4"
Tape 1" x 10 yds (waterproof)
Mole Skin
Nu Skin

Burn Treatment
Aloe
Water Gel Burn Kit

Tools
Wilderness First Aid Book
Kelly forceps
Splinter forceps
Scalpal
CPR Mask
EMT Shears
Stethoscope/BP kit
Irrigation syringe
Syringes, needles, suture, IV Drip
Muzzle
Thermometer
Flashlight
Tourniquet

Medications
Motrin
Tylenol
Aspirin
Benadryl
Imodium
Kaopectate
Oral rehydration

Great list!!

I agree that training is the key. Everyone does weapons training, most everyone practices survival "stuff" but a lot of people don't practice or train to a medical emergency. Start with the basics(see post in my signature) and move on from there.

We sweat in training so we don't bleed in war


Sent from my IPad so... Ease off the spelling

Onetyme
12-29-2012, 5:12 PM
Some cities provide CORE training. Oakland does Sorta like what FEMA provides. It's free and worth it. Contact your fire department & ask them. If your close, go to Oakland's.