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SonorousAria
11-23-2012, 1:57 PM
So my RIA 1911-MS is at the gunsmith getting modified. Among other things, they're installing a beavertail rip safety.The gunsmith told me he got a "drop-in" safety, but it still requires some fitting, He gave me the potion of modifying the beavertail, or the frame. He told me that functionally, it should work either way. My concern is for warranty and aesthetics. Armscore confirmed that the beavertail would not void the warranty, but modifying the frame might. Has anyone had this done and trimmed the safety itself to fit? do you have a picture of the back so I can see how it looks?

I should add that this is my first 1911 and I bought it used for a relatively low price. Because my initial investment is relatively low, if the modified beavertail looks really bad, I might be willing to take the chance on voiding the warranty.

Thanks

morrcarr67
11-23-2012, 2:34 PM
I would always do any work to the new part and not the frame. If they take too much off, get a new part and start over. much harder to do that if you're working on the frame.

ar15barrels
11-23-2012, 2:36 PM
Drop-in beaver tails suck.
Get a proper one and cut the tang off the frame.
That's the right way to do it.

As for fitting the safety, there is a fitting pad on the part that you cut JUST until the safety functions.

Press Check
11-23-2012, 2:47 PM
Actually, the correct way is to weld-up the frame tangs, followed by fitting, blending and contouring.

9mmepiphany
11-23-2012, 4:14 PM
The gunsmith told me he got a "drop-in" safety, but it still requires some fitting, He gave me the potion of modifying the beavertail, or the frame. He told me that functionally, it should work either way.
If I went to a gunsmith and he told me this, I'd walk out immediately...unless there is something else you told him that we don't know about.

While the fitting of most parts entails fitting the new part, fitting a beavertail grip safety is a completely different matter. While it may function the same, blocking the movement of the sear, it isn't the same thing when you are shooting it. Besides the way it may look, a improperly fitted grip safety will bit the web of your hand suring long practice sessions.

Here is a pretty standard one, which isn't fitted badly...Rock Island (pretty nice for a RIA)
http://www.bullseyesport.com/images/arm_51431.jpg

Here is a drop-in one that I wouldn't choose to shoot much with...Colt
http://img834.imageshack.us/img834/2719/coltlwc01.jpg

Here is one fitted correctly
http://www.10-8forums.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=download&Number=7339&filename=tangs%20colt%20023.JPG

1. The line between the grip safety and the frame should almost disappear
2. When released, the curve on the top should be one continuous curve without a break
3. When depressed, the line under the curve should be a continuous line
4. There should be no gaps along the whole backstrap when the safety is depressed

This level of fitting is a bit costly, but what you should try for as close to it as you can afford

Chief-7700
11-23-2012, 4:45 PM
The only real bad part is when the Smith put the radius jig on your frame and says 'You don't want to watch this" as he heads for the bench grinder.

Press Check
11-23-2012, 4:50 PM
This level of fitting is a bit costly, but what you should try for as close to it as you can afford

Rob at Alchemy Custom does a fantastic job with the weld-up, fit, blend and contour, but the best out there is Jeremy Reid; hands down, bar none, and it'll set you back about $300.

You get what you pay for.

9mmepiphany
11-23-2012, 7:52 PM
Rob at Alchemy Custom does a fantastic job with the weld-up, fit, blend and contour, but the best out there is Jeremy Reid; hands down, bar none, and it'll set you back about $300.

You get what you pay for.
For that kind of money, I rather go with a Graygun's Hardtail conversion

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q29/Rln_21/IMG_0373-1.jpg

Press Check
11-24-2012, 5:53 PM
For that kind of money, I rather go with a Graygun's Hardtail conversion

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q29/Rln_21/IMG_0373-1.jpg

Innovative, and definitely outside the box, but in my opinion, an integral beavertail is best suited to the Browning Hi-Power, and Polymer pistols. I'd imagine that accessing the sear, hammer, trigger and likewise internals during a detail-strip of the pistol would be exceedingly difficult.

missiontrails
11-24-2012, 7:31 PM
Ya, I had to grind down my new mainspring housing just so the beavertail safety would work and not bind.

9mmepiphany
11-24-2012, 9:52 PM
I'd imagine that accessing the sear, hammer, trigger and likewise internals during a detail-strip of the pistol would be exceedingly difficult.
Bruce engineered it so everything comes out through the opening when you remove the grip safety

SonorousAria
12-05-2012, 10:19 PM
So I just got it back from the gunsmith. The fit of the beavertail is not of the same quality that I've seen on $2500+ guns, but all told he ended up charging me $199 for hammer, beavertail, ambi safety, trigger, trigger job, and polish feed ramp and internals, and I got the gun for $380. I'm really happy with what I got. Next stop, Trijicon sights!!!

Hi-Jacking my own thread: Has anyone used Tooltech Gunsights? They're the shop that Trijicon refers all custom work to. What is their customer service like (Warranty), and what was your turnaround time?

Thanks!!!