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renardsubtil
11-02-2012, 10:13 AM
I was just thinking about the effects of the storm back east and thought about the potential natural catastrophes here in the Bay Area (an earthquake would be the top of the list) and I was wondering what you all think about this topic below.

How does one "prep" if your work takes you far away from your home? Like what sort of planning have you done or suggest for a person like myself? (See scenario below).

Example, I live in the East Bay (Tri-Valley area) and commute into San Francisco via BART. If a large earth quake hit the bay area and stopped basically all public transit, how should I prepare for this type of situation? I made myself a survival tin but that's about all I have planned....

I remember my dad getting stuck in traffic for 8+ hours in the earthquake of '89 because he worked at SFO but at least he had a car to take him around the San Mateo...alls I got is my two feet, I'm not sure BART would be open if an earthquake heavily damaged most of the Bay Area though....

gemoose23
11-02-2012, 10:18 AM
Some of my ideas for you:
Rent a Bicycle Locker at BART Station. Buy cheap but working bicycle and place in locker.
Carry "gethome" items in your commute bag.

Thus you'll have a method to get home in case of BART Failure and have minimal supplies, to provide in the couple of hours it could take you to get home via foot or bicycle.

paul0660
11-02-2012, 10:21 AM
Good walking shoes.

POLICESTATE
11-02-2012, 10:23 AM
Your situation is kind of screwed because you work across the bay. So if BART and the bridges are out the only way you're getting home is down the peninsula and back up through the east bay. On a bicycle I'm thinking this is going to take days depending on the conditions of the roads and other potential obstacles in your way. It's not like you'll be able to bike down 101 to 237 and then up 880.

In cases like yours maybe having a stash at your work of a few days (or more) of food/water and maybe a bike to get out of the city with would be a start. Doesn't look like you have much options in the self-defense dept though unless you have a LTC, of course there is always a knife and maybe pepper spray.

kaligaran
11-02-2012, 10:23 AM
I agree with the bicycle. I also think the bike locker idea from gemoose is a great idea. If I commuted by public transit, i would definitly do that.

When you carry minimal supplies it should be cover from elements like a poncho and wool socks. Fleece pullover and things like that.

Keep a surgical mask, gloves, flashlight, lifestraw or the like. The basics.
Also a detailed map of the city with pre-definied routes that you have decided would be the 'least traveled' relative to what you would expect (it's going to be chaos regardless).

ruchik
11-02-2012, 10:24 AM
I don't see any other way around it. Get yourself some good shoes, a well-supported pack, and start putting one foot in front of the other. I'm in the same position as you; I live in the east bay and commute to the peninsula. That's a full day's walk, but there's no other choice if transportation is down.

berto
11-02-2012, 10:27 AM
You need supplies at work and ideally a bag for your commute that you carry every day in case BART goes out mid ride. Shoes/boots, water, food, flashlight, a poncho, etc.

A bike is a good idea. I'll be looking for a ride across the bay on a boat.

ExAcHog
11-02-2012, 10:37 AM
The bike is a great idea. (I also think the bike locker idea from gemoose is a great.)
ALWAYS WATER!!! Steri pen or filtering straw, if not an actual waterfilter.
3M masks to breathe if buildings have fallen (earthquake) or if fires rage.
Every possible map you may need. (Free for members at AAA.com)
Cash to pay for possible boat crossing of bay.

Beyond those specifics, just a normal 72 hour bag.

slam128
11-02-2012, 10:43 AM
I'd have at the minimum a first aid kit, flashlight, knife, a thermal blanket/bivy bag, and a lighter in your work bag since you won't have a car to store anything else. From these items, you can at least survive 24-72 hours if you really needed to. From there, you'll have to be resourceful for food and water until you can find your way back home. At least you'll be somewhat secure with those items. I always carry these items in my work bag because they are compact and I know I won't be completely helpless.

POLICESTATE
11-02-2012, 10:48 AM
Hmmm, would it be possible to stash an inflatable raft and paddle at work or somewhere? Wonder how feasible it would be to use something like that across the bay, it *seems* viable.

renardsubtil
11-02-2012, 11:15 AM
Awesome, keep the ideas coming....

Money, that's a good idea, I don't have that in my tin.

A bike would be a great idea but there's really no place for me to store one (I work in the financial district).

I'll have to look into a 72 hour pack, I imagine that would be a very good idea as well - prolly much more realistic than my survival tin.


Hmmm, would it be possible to stash an inflatable raft and paddle at work or somewhere? Wonder how feasible it would be to use something like that across the bay, it *seems* viable.

Luckily I'm next to the Ferry building so I would "hope" at least that would be intact.

ExAcHog
11-02-2012, 11:42 AM
As for the bike storage....

If the BART bike locker thing does not work out:

1. See if your building has a maintenance supervisor. Tell him you want to keep a bike at work. Could he lock it up in a maintenance area?
(Maybe offer him $50 for his trouble, or does he have a favorite whiskey?)
You both keep a key, he has one in case bike needs to be moved.
Not the greatest, but better than nothing.

2. Remember, that cash in your 72 hour bag could also buy a bike from someone who doesn't have far to go.

3. Mark on a map the DOZENS & DOZENS of places in the city that rent bikes. Offer $200 cash to a kid making min wage and I think you will have a bike.

badreligion
11-02-2012, 12:15 PM
I don't know what it is exactly you do or what your working conditions are like but here is an idea I came up with for my wife. She works in an office building and has her own cubicle. She goes to the gym before work everyday so she always has a medium sized gym bag with her at her desk. Her gym bag acts like camouflage for her as she brings things into the office to stash. She keeps a file box under her desk in the corner that she has stored some basic supplies that will help her in case of an emergency. Things like a quality flashlight and head lamp with extra batteries, a change of more rugged clothing and shoes, a few things of food, a few bottles of water, a small advanced first aid kit, a small prybar, 550 cord, etc.
Before she built her Prep Box we made sure that everything besides the clothes would fit into her gym bag so she could carry everything with her if needed.
Most days of the week we carpool I to work together and in case of an emergency we plan to meet at my work were the truck is parked outside, its less than a mile walk. The truck is equipped to get us home which is nearly 30 miles. On the day she drives her vehicle is equipped to get her home, provided that the parking structure she parks in is still standing. We also have friends and close family less than 5 miles from our work so we have a place to hold up for a day or two if needed.

Op the bike is a great idea. A small handheld scanner/radio that can pick up emergency channels would seem like a good idea too so you can listen and get an idea which routes can be traveled. Make some friends who live close to your work and in the areas around possible routes, maybe they will offer up a couch or a place to store a small box of supplies.

Librarian
11-02-2012, 12:20 PM
Awesome, keep the ideas coming....

Money, that's a good idea, I don't have that in my tin.

A bike would be a great idea but there's really no place for me to store one (I work in the financial district).

I'll have to look into a 72 hour pack, I imagine that would be a very good idea as well - prolly much more realistic than my survival tin.




Luckily I'm next to the Ferry building so I would "hope" at least that would be intact.

Look at the shake map for SF at http://quake.abag.ca.gov/shaking/

Near the water is going to be BAD.

One of the problems with having stuff at work (and you should!) is that very few people stay at their desks all day - they go to meetings, they go to lunch, etc. If the 'event' happens while you are away from your desk, your stuff may be inaccessible. If you can, keep that tin in a pocket ...

I had an acquaintance who had a Mountainsmith lumbar pack he wore everywhere, with some amount of emergency gear (never asked him what, exactly). But computer geeks can get away with some unusual dress that more 'traditional' jobs won't tolerate.

The concept is just another variation on a Get Home Bag (GHB), usually a much smaller copy of a Bug Out Bag (BOB).

POLICESTATE
11-02-2012, 12:28 PM
Look at the shake map for SF at http://quake.abag.ca.gov/shaking/

Near the water is going to be BAD.


I'm near wetlands south of the bay. My liquefaction color is yellow, Shake color is a bright red. I'm pretty screwed, especially in a mobile home.

berto
11-02-2012, 12:58 PM
Awesome, keep the ideas coming....

Money, that's a good idea, I don't have that in my tin.

A bike would be a great idea but there's really no place for me to store one (I work in the financial district).

I'll have to look into a 72 hour pack, I imagine that would be a very good idea as well - prolly much more realistic than my survival tin.

Luckily I'm next to the Ferry building so I would "hope" at least that would be intact.

Does your building have a bike room or a cage in the garage for those who commute by bike? My building does. Maybe you have storage space in the office for a folding bike?

I discussed scenarios with another calgunner in the FiDi and he was looking at self storage units in the general area and thinking about storing supplies, a bike, and maybe something that goes bang.

renardsubtil
11-02-2012, 1:49 PM
I work in an office building...I know there's a bike padlock area inside but I'm not sure about leaving a bike there for long periods of time. Sounds like I may look into a get home bag for storage in my office cubicle.

Paltik
11-02-2012, 1:51 PM
How does one "prep" if your work takes you far away from your home? Like what sort of planning have you done or suggest for a person like myself?

You're getting a lot of good suggestions here. To simplify:


Have a plan or two for getting home. Thinking about what bridges, overpasses, tunnels, etc. might be out, plot an actual route and prepare a map of that route. You may want a route over water, a route on foot, and a route on bicycle.
Have a "get home bag" (GHB). There have been some excellent suggestions for what to include. Keep your planned route(s) in mind as you assemble the contents. Make sure you'll have adequate potable water, comfortable trekking clothes, plus other items for food, shelter, self defense, etc.
Consider a storage area for your gear: under your desk, a cage in your office basement, a storage unit you rent, a boathouse, a friend's garage, etc. Now think what might happen to each location in an earthquake or fire, and adjust your plan accordingly.
Just for fun (or is it?), you might try getting home from work some day/weekend, following one of your routes, using the contents of your GHB. Adjust your plan accordingly.

21SF
11-02-2012, 1:53 PM
Steal a boat in SF take it to martinez. Done and done.

njineermike
11-02-2012, 2:20 PM
I travel extensively. Sometimes I spend 300 or more days per year on the road. Just last week I was in Alaska and Seattle, and next week I'll be in Oregon. I "prep" by wearing the right clothing, packing at least one meal in my backpack and 2 in my checked bags, having tools and knives, etc. I need to check my bags because I have tooling that isn't carry-on legal.

Guns - When I travel to areas I know I won't have issues, I occasionally check a handgun, but not one of the good ones. I check something that won't break my heart if it doesn't make the destination. Ammo can be purchased as soon as I get off the plane.

Knife - My EDC knife goes in the checked bag too. I've been known to buy a new one as soon as I land as a backup. One with me, one in my backpack.

Tools - I Always, and I do mean ALWAYS have a multi-tool on hand. There is one in my truck bed tool box AND my glove box, one in my fiance's glove box, one in my pocket. I like the Leatherman Kick the best as it's small and light, and fits in a pair of carpenter pants side pocket, but has the necessary tools. I also keep a titanium eating utensil with a bottle opener, can opener, screwdriver and spork in my bag.

Food - I keep one mylar packet of tuna or salmon, a protein bar and a bottle of water at all times. In my checked bag I keep more. No cans, something easy to access. All it took was one trip to India to show me the wisdom of bringing actual edible food with me.

Clothing - I keep boots and 1 pair of Dickies carpenter pants in my check bag. Beige, black or green carpenter pants pass for slacks if nobody looks too closely. Luckily, work boots pass for business meeting attire for me, as I tend to end up on a muddy construction site or utility field. I wear 100% COTTON when I fly as it tends to be more resistive to fire than poly-cotton blends.

Vehicles - ALWAYS at least half full of gas. ALWAYS have salmon or tuna packs in the passenger compartment. ALWAYS have a case of bottled water in the trunk. ALWAYS have a GPS units. ALWAYS have a phone charger. ALWAYS have extra batteries in the glove box. ALWAYS buy a map as soon as I land when I fly, as I travel into areas I don;t have a map when I drive. Aviation and topographical maps are a great thing to have as well. Also keep a small blanket and something useful for personal shelter if possible. Those little mylar emergency blankets work great.

Documentation - ALWAYS scan a copy of your passport, travel visa and drivers license and email them to yourself at some location you can retrieve them internationally BEFORE you travel. If leaving the country, notify the state department, get on the alert mailing list, know EXACTLY where the local US embassy and consulate are as well as the CANADIAN and BRITISH embassies and consulates. If the area is known to be sketchy, check in with the US embassy and let them know who you are, where you plan on being, and how long your stay is intended to be.

Do I sound paranoid? Maybe, but I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

kaligaran
11-02-2012, 2:25 PM
If leaving the country, notify the state department, get on the alert mailing list, know EXACTLY where the local US embassy and consulate are as well as the CANADIAN and BRITISH embassies and consulates. If the area is known to be sketchy, check in with the US embassy and let them know who you are, where you plan on being, and how long your stay is intended to be.

Do I sound paranoid? Maybe, but I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

I don't ever leave hte country but this is something I never thought of.
That's great advice.

njineermike
11-02-2012, 2:34 PM
I don't ever leave hte country but this is something I never thought of.
That's great advice.

Knowing where US embassy was located made me getting out of Turkey the last time Isreal bombed Lebanon and Istanbul was flooded with refugees and the PKK decided bomb soft targets LOT easier.

Oh, and flashlights! ALWAYS have at least one waterproof LED flashlight with fresh batteries.

BTW, steel wool will start a campfire when you use batteries as the ignition source.

Librarian
11-02-2012, 4:51 PM
Steal a boat in SF take it to martinez. Done and done.

Suggestion has been made before. Armed boat owners recommend one doesn't try it.

Consider, rather, a pre-arranged water transport with one or several owners.

xgi1991
11-02-2012, 5:25 PM
Well, that all depends, are you a suit or do you go casual to work? If casual, have pockets. First, look at what you can liberate from your building, SHTF, it won’t matter. Is there a break room with a fridge/kitchen (food, eating utensils, etc.)? Is there a fire ax anywhere? Can you stash a pack in your desk? What floor are you on, is rappelling equipment a need or option. If you have a coffee machine, is there sugar and filters to liberate? Is there toilet paper in the bath room? In your position you need to think a little out of the box, while everyone else is running around like a chicken with their head cut off, you can be comely salvage what you need to get out of dodge. What is your EDC (every day carry)? Do you pack a knife at least? Better yet, do you pack a knife and a multi-tool? Toss a few Mountain House meals in your desk. Be creative, after all, it is your personal scenario, you have to make it fit.

son_of_a_gunny
11-02-2012, 6:17 PM
When SHTF in Japan last year - It took my cousin one full week to walk home. He lives across Toyko bay from his work.

I work 40 miles from home, but I don't need to cross water:
Plan A - I drive a 4WD truck (I never let the fuel get below 1/2).
Plan B - MT Bike in the back of the truck (I ride this bike at lunch time for my health most days).
Plan C - Walk with the get home backpack I keep in the truck.

You should plan on a week long walk.
I would carry roller skates, a few packs of beef jerkey and lots of thoses little packets of jam. As well as the "First Need" water purifier and other BOB stuff.

njineermike
11-02-2012, 6:49 PM
When SHTF in Japan last year - It took my cousin one full week to walk home. He lives across Toyko bay from his work.

I work 40 miles from home, but I don't need to cross water:
Plan A - I drive a 4WD truck (I never let the fuel get below 1/2).
Plan B - MT Bike in the back of the truck (I ride this bike at lunch time for my health most days).
Plan C - Walk with the get home backpack I keep in the truck.

You should plan on a week long walk.
I would carry roller skates, a few packs of beef jerkey and lots of thoses little packets of jam. As well as the "First Need" water purifier and other BOB stuff.


Water purifier is a great thing to have.

I also have one of these (http://www.findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=102):

http://www.findmespot.com/images/spot2_prodpage.jpg

It can send a pre-formatted text message from anywhere you can get a GPS signal and send your GPS location with the text.

Cali-Glock
12-12-2012, 8:34 PM
Good walking shoes.

Good walking shoes are at the top of my list.
Jacket
Good hat
Emergency fanny pack
Second gun, extra ammo
Bag for carrying stuff
Knife
Try to keep my tank full. (600+ miles on a tank)
I used to carry a small shortwave radio, a handheld cb and an old 2 meter HT, but have not packed any of those items in a few years. (limited space)

Added: It occurred to me I forgot to list flashlights, and other crap I maintain the car and luggage!@

ElvenSoul
12-13-2012, 9:45 AM
Good walking shoes are at the top of my list.
Jacket
Good hat
Emergency fanny pack
Second gun, extra ammo
Bag for carrying stuff
Knife
Try to keep my tank full. (600+ miles on a tank)
I used to carry a small shortwave radio, a handheld cb and an old 2 meter HT, but have not packed any of those items in a few years. (limited space)

Grandma Gatewood could walk from Georgia to Maine wearing Keds and using a plastic shower curtain for shelter I'm sure you could make it a few hundred miles.