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View Full Version : New 30-06 Ammo Advice


DeadWhiteGoose
10-09-2012, 11:09 PM
Hey guys. Just bought a Remington 700 in 30-06 and haven't shot it yet. I was told it's usually good to start shooting the loads you mainly plan on using to get the gun used to it. I bought a couple boxes of 165 grain Fuzion rounds since I figured the 165 grain weight is a good medium. Problem is, now I'm realizing that everywhere I go has an abundance of 150gr and 180gr rounds in 30-06 but hardly anything in 165gr. Would I be better off switching to a different grain weight? Or just stick with the 165 and keep making trips to the more specialty stores? I plan on hunting deer, pig and eventually bear and elk. Or should I just buy a few different weights and see what shoots better out of my rifle? Thanks for the advice guys

sigstroker
10-10-2012, 12:21 AM
The whole point of having a .30-06 is it's versatile enough, with different bullets, to hunt all of those different animals. It's silly to plan on using just one bullet weight.

wtkaiser
10-10-2012, 8:25 AM
Did someone actually tell you that the gun "has to get used to the load", like it's a conditioniing thing?

elx144
10-10-2012, 9:58 AM
From what I've read you will need to re-zero with the different bullet weights. The farther you're shooting the more the weight will affect point of impact. I know from experience that different brands of ammo can affect accuracy, so it's not good to switch without know the effects. That being said don't be afraid to try new ammo, just know what could happen and be ready to adjust your scope. You might even be able to switch between 150g, 165, and 180g if you know how POI will change and adjust your sights accordingly when you're loading your magazine. Of course I'm not going to know with 95% certainty until this weekend. I just finished the DROS on my .30-06 Marlin XL7 but I haven't had a chance to pick it up yet. I have a couple boxes of 150 and a couple boxes of 180 ready to go for Saturday morning.

Divernhunter
10-10-2012, 10:37 AM
All you need is 150gr bullets. Target practice with cheap ammo and hunt with good stuff like Nosler Partition. Just be sure you do the final sight in with the good stuff. When target practicing do not worry if they are not in the bullseye. You just want them to shoot as tight as possibe wherever they shoot. Also sight it in about 2.75" high at 100 yards and you are good to go. Hold on the animal out to as far,or more, that you should shoot and you will have a dead animal. I have friends who take elk with a 150gr Nosler Partition. I have taken many deer and some pigs with it. If in a no-lead zone a 130-150gr Barnes TTSX works well or a 150gr Hornady GMX. You may need to rezero with the non-lead ammo.

RalphAdopolis
10-10-2012, 11:05 AM
All you need is 150gr bullets. Target practice with cheap ammo and hunt with good stuff like Nosler Partition. Just be sure you do the final sight in with the good stuff. When target practicing do not worry if they are not in the bullseye. You just want them to shoot as tight as possibe wherever they shoot. Also sight it in about 2.75" high at 100 yards and you are good to go. Hold on the animal out to as far,or more, that you should shoot and you will have a dead animal. I have friends who take elk with a 150gr Nosler Partition. I have taken many deer and some pigs with it. If in a no-lead zone a 130-150gr Barnes TTSX works well or a 150gr Hornady GMX. You may need to rezero with the non-lead ammo.

^^^^ could not have said it better my self.

My main hunting rifle is also a Remington 700 30.06 and I only really use 150gr ammo which is perfectly fine for medium game such as dear, hogs and even elk, and I have used 180gr, but I will warn you the 180gr ammo kicks like a mule. For a scope I would recommend Nikon with a BDC reticle so you can use their Spot on program which will save you money and time.

elx144
10-18-2012, 1:41 PM
I got my rifle sighted in on Sunday. I didn't see a difference between 150gr and 180gr at 100 yards but I will be testing the 200-300 yard targets next week. ( took vacation time to stay home and go target/trap shoot ) I'll be adjusting to 2.75 over at 100 yards.

gun toting monkeyboy
10-18-2012, 1:46 PM
Did someone actually tell you that the gun "has to get used to the load", like it's a conditioniing thing?

:rofl2::rofl: That is just funny. OP, whoever told you that knows nothing about firearms, and probably shouldn't be allow out in public unsupervised. I would also keep him away from sharp objects for fear of what he might do to himself.

-Mb

Sunday
10-21-2012, 8:18 PM
:rofl2::rofl: That is just funny. OP, whoever told you that knows nothing about firearms, and probably shouldn't be allow out in public unsupervised. I would also keep him away from sharp objects for fear of what he might do to himself.

-MbDon't forget the barrel break in!!!:43:

Garandimal
10-22-2012, 9:49 AM
The whole point of having a .30-06 is it's versatile enough, with different bullets, to hunt all of those different animals. It's silly to plan on using just one bullet weight.

Tend to disagree w/ this statement.

There is a lot to be said for using One (1) round for any particular rifle.

...I plan on hunting deer, pig and eventually bear and elk...

The first choice would be a good 180 gr. like the Nosler Partition, Remington Core-lokt, or Speer DeepCurl.

If you are limited by your field to an Eco-Terrorist round, a 165 gr. Barnes Triple-Shock is hard to beat.


I shoot only 150 gr. lead-core and 140 gr. copper ammo out of my .270 Win... it works great.

Do I care that there are myriad other choices...? No.

Do I like a predictable sighted rifle and ballistic performance that will take mice-to-moose out to 400 yards...? Yep.


Fiddle-factor is strong w/ the 30-06, don't give in to the dark side.

The exception should be a round/load that is exceptionally accurate... which will tend to be heavy-for-caliber anyway.

If recoil is an issue, install a good pad or drop down to a .270 Win. or even a .260 Rem.




GR

Tanner68
10-22-2012, 10:00 AM
I am just starting out with a new 30/06 rifle. I have shot and hunted in the past with a 270, 243, 7.5x55, and others. I agree with Garandimal. For now, I am trying to ignore the fiddlefactor. I am just sticking to 180 grains, and shooting different brands and bullets, and will start reloading for it soon too. Later on down the road, maybe I will work on some 150 grain loads. But 180 will do for quite a while, 'till I know this rifle and this load real well. And the 180gr rounds out my battery a bit, as my other rifles favor lighter bullets.

rojocorsa
10-22-2012, 10:40 AM
FWIW, I always see 165gr Core-Lokt at Big 5....

wjc
10-22-2012, 4:38 PM
I use 150 gr. in my 30-06. That weight seems to work fine for target and live game.

btw, if you normally use lead ammo for target and decide to go hunting with lead-free you may have to re-adjust your scope. I found lead-free does not have the same ballistic qualities as lead ammo in my rifle.

Not a biggie, just have to re-zero for non-lead ammo.

toby
10-22-2012, 5:07 PM
Most will shoot 150-165-180's pretty much all the same at 100 yrds or at least within reason, thats the only beauty of a 30-06 Just shoot what ever you want if scope adjustment must be made it wont be much.

Arrowhunters5
10-22-2012, 5:14 PM
I also use a 30-06. My suggestion is to shoot whatever shoots best in your rifle with a quality bullet. I shoot long range with my gun, my BDC on my Leupold goes to 775 yards. My 14 year old shot his first buck with my rifle about two weeks ago at 535 yards. I tested Hornady, Nosler, Winchester,and Remington Premier ammo. My gun likes the Remington premier 180 grain Scirrocco. It shoots right at 1/2 inch at a 100 yards, when I do my part. Some of the ammo I shot was almost 3.5 inches at a 100 yards. Good luck, its not cheap in the beginning, but once you find what your gun likes, stick with it and you will have a lot of fun.