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semitch
07-06-2007, 3:27 PM
Hello All,
I recently purchased a S&W 627 revolver (my first revolver :-) ) and wanted to try reloading 38 special/357 magnum shells for it. I also bought a new in the box RCBS press, accessories, and a reloading manual from a guy at work who had all of this stuff sitting in his garage for about $40. After setting everything up I decided to load a couple of shells that I had been saving so I went down to my local gun store and bought some 148 Gr. Double-Ended WadCutters, 1lb of Bullseye Powder, and some Federal small pistol primers.

My questions are the following:

My reloading manual (Speer #10) says for 148 gr. bevel base W.C. (38 special shells) to use 3.9 to 4.5 grains of bullseye and for 148 gr. hollowbase W.C. to use 2.8 gr. to 3.1 gr. of bullseye. Should I treat 148 Grain. Double-Ended WadCutters as simply bevel based W.C.?

My manual also says for 357 magnum shells to load 148 grain hollow base W.C. with 3.0 to 3.3 grains of bullseye. What do you do for Double-Ended WadCutters?

Could you also give me a suggestion as to where to set the crimp for both of these?

I also clearly see why everyone on this forum tends to express the need to have extra manuals on hand and I plan on ordering a couple of them when I get some money together. Also, after playing with my press I now see a progressive press in the distant future.

Thanks

Budd
07-06-2007, 4:08 PM
If you are reloading anyways - just shoot .357 brass through it. there have been several arguments that .38 special loads hur the .357 revolver due to COL(1.46" vs 1.59" IIRC). Why risk it when it is just a change of brass?

BTW - 6.8gr of titegroup under a 125gr Golden Saber with a win mag primer is great. Don't have much info on bullseye though.

Black_Talon
07-06-2007, 4:21 PM
My reloading manual (Speer #10) says for 148 gr. bevel base W.C. (38 special shells) to use 3.9 to 4.5 grains of bullseye and for 148 gr. hollowbase W.C. to use 2.8 gr. to 3.1 gr. of bullseye. Should I treat 148 Grain. Double-Ended WadCutters as simply bevel based W.C.?

Yes. The DEWC's need a bit more pressure behind them so hat the lead obturates enough to seal/fit the bullet to the barrel. The (usually softer 'cause they're usually swaged as opposed to cast) HBWC doesn't need (and can't really take, because of the soft lead) much pressure behind it as the hollow base easily expands to obturate at fairly low velocity/pressure.

My manual also says for 357 magnum shells to load 148 grain hollow base W.C. with 3.0 to 3.3 grains of bullseye. What do you do for Double-Ended WadCutters?

The DEWC's will need more velocity in the 357, just as they do in the 38 Spl. I'd start somewhere on the high end of the 38 Spl data and go from there. I've never personally loaded WC's in 357 so I can't give you any better info than that.

Could you also give me a suggestion as to where to set the crimp for both of these?

Most people (me included) tend to seat WC's just below flush with the case mouth and use some amount of roll crimp over the top of the bullet. Some folks will seat out the WC's to the first crimp groove (if they have one) and roll-crimp into the groove. The theory here is that the bullet being seated out beyond the end of the case will (or may) rest in the throat of the cylinder, potentially giving better accuracy. I've tried both ways, in many, many 38 Spl revolvers over the years and never found one way to be more accurate than the other.

semitch
07-06-2007, 4:48 PM
Thanks for the quick reply gents. I just came a cross a website that recommed 4.0 grains of Bullseye for the reasons that you stated Black Talon in your answer. I am concern with that much powder would I starting to get above 850 fps and have to worry about a leading issue. 2.7 grains to 4.0 grains of powder seems like a huge different. But I am new to this reloading thing.

The reason that I want to load 38 special is because I was given about 1500 shells by a friend of mine. Figure I would save some money by using free shells instead of buying new 357 shells are loaded ammo. I was under the impression that using 38 in a 357 was not a big deal. Is this wrong?

tankerman
07-06-2007, 8:24 PM
Thanks for the quick reply gents. I just came a cross a website that recommed 4.0 grains of Bullseye for the reasons that you stated Black Talon in your answer. I am concern with that much powder would I starting to get above 850 fps and have to worry about a leading issue. 2.7 grains to 4.0 grains of powder seems like a huge different. But I am new to this reloading thing.

The reason that I want to load 38 special is because I was given about 1500 shells by a friend of mine. Figure I would save some money by using free shells instead of buying new 357 shells are loaded ammo. I was under the impression that using 38 in a 357 was not a big deal. Is this wrong?
No loading 38's in a 357 is not a big deal. You may get some carbon build up after shooting 38's that may cause the 357 to stick in the cylinder. But as long as you clean in well before switching from 38 to 357 you will not experience this issue. I have never had any problem with my revolvers from switching between these two rounds

ar15barrels
07-06-2007, 8:25 PM
The only issue with 38's in a 357 is that if you shoot enough lead bullets, eventually lead will build up just forward of the 38 special case length.
If you try to shove a 357 round in there, pressure will spike.
You need to be sure to clean out the chambers of all the extra lead before shooting 357's again.

Clymer sells a "de-leading" reamer, but conventional cleaning brushes work too.
They just need more elbow grease.

awheelman357
07-06-2007, 8:32 PM
38's are fine in a 357 i have a 627 it is a v-comp great gun. the dewc is a good paper load for the range it is a little slow on the reload i shoot a 158 grain bullet in a shortened 38 case it makes for faster reloads i shoot mine in matches. by the way there are a lot better moon clips out than what comes with the gun if you have any questions let me know. what city are you in?

tankerman
07-06-2007, 9:09 PM
The only issue with 38's in a 357 is that if you shoot enough lead bullets, eventually lead will build up just forward of the 38 special case length.
If you try to shove a 357 round in there, pressure will spike.
You need to be sure to clean out the chambers of all the extra lead before shooting 357's again.

Clymer sells a "de-leading" reamer, but conventional cleaning brushes work too.
They just need more elbow grease.
If there is enough lead build up to cause a pressure spike then the bullet would not fit in the chamber.