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scoobydo
09-13-2012, 11:03 AM
Would opening up the buffer and adding spacers to the tungsten weights affect performance?
I know the thing is supposed to make a spoing noise, but it is the buffer weight-shift I am talking about.
I heard some people eliminate it by adding spacers and making it solid-feeling and others who say the weight-shift is needed to eliminate felt recoil.
Is there any definitive info on the subject?
If it is all the same, I would rather space it to eliminate the shifting "thwap" noise.

Dhena81
09-13-2012, 11:24 AM
What's the problem are you trying to reduce the reciprocating weight or eliminate the sound?

If you want to reduce the reciprocating weight you could go down to a lower weight buffer and add a LMT enhanced carrier or buy a red springco spring.

If you wanted to eliminate the sound you could lubricate your buffer spring and add a loud brake or buy something JPE makes.

starsnuffer
09-13-2012, 11:36 AM
Am I interpreting this correctly by saying that you want to keep the buffer from sliding at all?

-W

scoobydo
09-13-2012, 11:36 AM
No, nothing to do with the spring or carrier.
I have an lmt basic waffle kit that comes with a heavy buffer.
If you hold the buffer weight in your hand and teeter it back and forth you can feel the weights inside shift/slide back and forth.
If I take the roll pin out (to access the weights and spacers) and add more spacers to eliminate the empty space, will thus affect performance?

scoobydo
09-13-2012, 11:39 AM
Am I interpreting this correctly by saying that you want to keep the buffer from sliding at all?

-W

No, this only pertains to the weights and spacers inside the buffer.

Merc1138
09-13-2012, 11:51 AM
Use a scale, remove weight, add lighter weight spacers to take up more room.

bloodhawke83
09-13-2012, 12:00 PM
Op, you using 22lr in that ar?

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

EvolutionGSR
09-13-2012, 12:04 PM
I dont think he wants to remove any weights, if i am reading his post correctly, he just wants to make his buffer more "solid" so when you shake it it doesnt sound like s spray paint can.
I cant think of how it would hurt. But I dont claim to know much either.

Merc1138
09-13-2012, 12:08 PM
I dont think he wants to remove any weights, if i am reading his post correctly, he just wants to make his buffer more "solid" so when you shake it it doesnt sound like s spray paint can.
I cant think of how it would hurt. But I dont claim to know much either.

Yes, but if you just add spacers without removing weight, you increase the weight of the buffer. If you want the buffer to remain the same, you'll need spacers that weigh less than the material you're removing(so they take up more space) and keep the total weight the same.

Although considering the various sproings, clicks, and bangs that happen when using an AR-15, I think complaining about the weight in the buffer moving is silly.

scoobydo
09-13-2012, 12:12 PM
I dont think he wants to remove any weights, if i am reading his post correctly, he just wants to make his buffer more "solid" so when you shake it it doesnt sound like s spray paint can.
I cant think of how it would hurt. But I dont claim to know much either.

Correct.
Its hard to explain without somebody thinking I am talking about the spring or the noise it makes.
My thinking was that it could not hurt.
However, I am not as informed yet.

FMJBT
09-13-2012, 12:15 PM
You could try out a 9mm buffer. I have a 9mm buffer from (I think...) Rock River Arms, and it's pretty solid. There is no discernable shifting of weights within the buffer, although it is heavier than a standard 5.56 buffer.

Spikes Tactical buffer is another option. It uses powdered tungsten rather than solid weights. The shifting of weight is still there, but without the clacking sound.

Dhena81
09-13-2012, 12:15 PM
No, nothing to do with the spring or carrier.
I have an lmt basic waffle kit that comes with a heavy buffer.
If you hold the buffer weight in your hand and teeter it back and forth you can feel the weights inside shift/slide back and forth.
If I take the roll pin out (to access the weights and spacers) and add more spacers to eliminate the empty space, will thus affect performance?

You must have visited the Spikes tactical site and read up on their high speed low drag tactical buffer that doesn't have any moving weights.

Wildeman_13
09-13-2012, 12:24 PM
I don't think I have ever even noticed this. Like was posted above, with all the other noises and vibrations in the AR platform, what is one more slight wobble? It doesn't effect accuracy, it doesn't effect weight, and it might effect how your rifle eats certain rounds unless you get the buffer weight exactly what it was before. Why fuss with something so minor?
Sorry, OP. I'm not trying to sound like a jerk here, just pointing out that spending time and effort fixing this is like worrying about scratching up the lower on a working rifle. Who cares about it as long as it works right. Now if this is a Safe-queen/range toy shot from bean bags only type gun and it bothers you that much, by all means fix it.

scoobydo
09-13-2012, 12:56 PM
I have been informed that the shifting is there to eliminate bolt bounce which could cause a failure to feed.
Thanks all for your help.

Tjfearl
09-13-2012, 1:07 PM
Just buy a Spikes Tactical buffer. They make them in different weights and they are filled with tungsten powder and don't make noise or move.

hermosabeach
09-13-2012, 1:11 PM
I had an upper built in 1994 and the smith also tweaked my lower

The buffer spring was polished to a mirror finish as was the inside of the buffer tube it changed the sound of the spring.

The spring being compressed and returned will make a sound

I am now a fan of the David Tubbs flat AR springs

It is a longer spring that compresses shorter when fully compressed

They help when you shoot different weight bullets and lighter and heavier loads
They provide a more uniform compression and less bolt bounce than circular diameter wire springs

At the end of the day, if they gun works, it works