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SilverTauron
08-23-2012, 1:37 PM
Lets see how long this discussion can remain civil before the fanboys come in and ruin the show.

Here's my question to the assembly on Calguns:how many gun owners standardize to one platform that they are good at shooting?

I used to own a staple of DA/SA weapons which worked competently and shot well for their purpose, but I reached a point where I just couldn't extract any more practical accuracy out of them. Ergnomic issues related to the grip and the DA pull kept ruining my shooting sessions.

I picked up a 1911 recently, and have now 'standardized' to that platform of weapon for my pistol shooting. Ive realized I can actually enjoy my sessions more instead of looking at my target in frustration. Understand that I'm not crusading for everyone to sell their Glocks and Sigs for Saint Browning's .45 ACP wondergun, but for me that's the right platform for accurate and enjoyable shooting.

Im curious what other brands you guys have standardized to, and why.
;)

frankm
08-23-2012, 1:44 PM
I standardize to calibers, but not guns. I like the most common in-use, especially if police and military use them.

unusedusername
08-23-2012, 1:50 PM
I have mostly standardized to one platform, with one gun that is non-standard.

It is actually kind of hard to do "one type for everything" as there isn't one platform that encompasses every size between a pocket pistol to a large target pistol.

Even the 1911s do not have a small "pocket" version that I am aware of, only subcompacts (Colt Defender, Sig 939, Kimber CDP are subcompacts IMHO). Glock also does not offer a "pocket" pistol, and Sigs "pocketish" (P290) pistol is not in the same manual of arms as their other P-series guns.

XDRoX
08-23-2012, 2:01 PM
I own all sorts but when I go to the range I only bring my Glocks in order to improve with them.

When looking for a new gun to buy these days I specifically look for something in a caliber I don't own yet. I want to own as many different calibers as possible.

ZombieTactics
08-23-2012, 2:01 PM
It makes sense to standardize on a common manual of arms or operation, and perhaps a caliber. Other than that, I'm not sure there are any advantages to be had.

greybeard
08-23-2012, 2:06 PM
I have pretty much standardized on things with a hammer that did SA or DA/SA, never got the hang of DA only. I started shooting M&P and have decided not all striker fired guns are bad. I still do not like polymer .40.

Squidward
08-23-2012, 2:07 PM
I started "standardizing' a couple of years back. All HD pistols are in one caliber and one platform. The others are safe queens awaiting sale. My goal is to have only .22lr and 9mm for pistols.

Sam
08-23-2012, 2:12 PM
I've standardized on one caliber/action for my self defense pistols. Not having to remember the manual of arms under stress is a great thing. As is gaining a level of sufficiency that is more easily reached with one manual of arms.

Lead Waster
08-23-2012, 2:12 PM
Well, shooting is a hobby, not a necessity for me, so I have several calibers and several brands. I even have a black powder replica (yet to shoot :( ).

I'm in it for fun, not practicality or work, so I see no point in standardizing.

For me it's like "Which genre of book or movie do you want to standardize to?". None, I like variety.

Also I don't want to standardize one "manual of arms" I want to know how everything works and practice with them all.

That's my opinion anyway.

Arkangel
08-23-2012, 2:16 PM
I picked up a 1911 recently, and have now 'standardized' to that platform of weapon for my pistol shooting. Ive realized I can actually enjoy my sessions more instead of looking at my target in frustration. Understand that I'm not crusading for everyone to sell their Glocks and Sigs for Saint Browning's .45 ACP wondergun, but for me that's the right platform for accurate and enjoyable shooting.


What an amazing turn of opinion... You have truly converted to the light :)

As for your question, I have not standardized to any one platform. I don't think I ever will.

Shenaniguns
08-23-2012, 2:18 PM
I'm going back to standardizing on Glocks but will throw a pocket snubbie in the mix since their isn't a Glock to fill that niche. After owning various platforms at one time and shooting them all about equally, I found it was better for me to train and practice on just Glocks or M&P's which is what I use for defensive purposes

Big Ben
08-23-2012, 2:23 PM
I'll got the other direction with this. I'm still trying to diversify my collection.

I love guns of all styles and types. I have a number of different manufacturers and styles, and a wish list loaded with others that I still plan to add to the collection. When I go shooting, I usually don't take them all, but will take 2-4 different guns, just to mix things up.

Does it hurt the development of skill and pin-point accuracy vs. working with a single gun or platform? Probably. But for me, the trade-off of pure joy in being able to shoot a polymer frame pistol, a revolver, and a "mouse gun" all in the same range trip more than make up for it.

Just my $0.02

Fadedline
08-23-2012, 2:26 PM
I want to be Top Shot with every platform ;) Seriously, too many cool guns for me to standardize.

Grumpyoldretiredcop
08-23-2012, 2:27 PM
I used to keep what I carried on duty and off pretty standardized to avoid the "which gun am I carrying today" syndrome if it all dropped in the pot. Now that I'm retired, it's more about standardizing calibers as I tend to carry a revolver in the summer (easier to pocket carry) and a G19 in the winter. That doesn't mean I might not pull a 1911 out of the safe to carry once in a while, though, wouldn't want to incur the wrath of JMB! :D

MXRider
08-23-2012, 2:28 PM
I own 4 Glocks and they work for me. I still have an urge to buy a 1911 and a Hi Power, but those keep getting put on the back burner for other items. The Hi Power is cheap enough, but I can't find a 1911 I want under $2,000, and at that price, I have many other items I would rather buy.

My father keeps talking about giving me one of his Colt 1991's, but that hasn't happened yet.

Ripon83
08-23-2012, 2:29 PM
Thought I could, but can't do it.

I have simplified but I just can't go with one....22, 9mm, 38, 223, 308, 338m and 12 gauge.....I use to keep 45's too but dropped it; I'm bailing on 7.62x39 as well.

InGrAM
08-23-2012, 2:30 PM
The more firearms and calibers the better. People need to learn how to shoot more than just a Glock in 9mm or .40 caliber.

redcliff
08-23-2012, 2:33 PM
I shoot approximately 75% of my ammo through 1911's, 20% through revolvers and the remaining 5% includes a diverse group, from Lugers to HK P7's and sometimes even Glocks. The only thing I don't shoot is da/sa autos with slide mounted safeties as I feel their safety moving in the opposite direction from a 1911's is bad muscle memory for me since I ccw a 1911.

ClarenceBoddicker
08-23-2012, 2:39 PM
If I could only have one handgun it would be a Browning High Power in 9mm, with a spare detective kit for it.

friedokra
08-23-2012, 2:39 PM
The more firearms and calibers the better. People need to learn how to shoot more than just a Glock in 9mm or .40 caliber.

Yeah, they need to learn how to shoot the Glock in .45 :rolleyes :D
But seriously, when I was on duty, I carried a Glock 17 and a 26 as BUG due to commonality of caliber/magazine. After North Hollywood, I switched to G21, and wanted commonality of caliber/magazines, but at that time, they didn't have the G30 or 36 widely available until later.

Hopalong
08-23-2012, 2:59 PM
Well, shooting is a hobby, not a necessity for me, so I have several calibers and several brands. I even have a black powder replica (yet to shoot :( ).

I'm in it for fun, not practicality or work, so I see no point in standardizing.

For me it's like "Which genre of book or movie do you want to standardize to?". None, I like variety.

Also I don't want to standardize one "manual of arms" I want to know how everything works and practice with them all.

That's my opinion anyway.
Me too.

Not everyone is a Soldier Of Fortune, Rambo

Or constantly paranoid that they are going to be mugged.

In the meantime, we hobbyists are having a heck of a good time

Shenaniguns
08-23-2012, 3:01 PM
Me too.

Not everyone is a Soldier Of Fortune, Rambo

Or constantly paranoid that they are going to be mugged.

In the meantime, we hobbyists are having a heck of a good time


Talk like that does not help our side at all...

Hopalong
08-23-2012, 3:16 PM
Talk like that does not help our side at all...
Boy, do you have a lot to learn about the meaning of pro 2A.

In the meantime, enjoy yourself, I am

Shenaniguns
08-23-2012, 3:20 PM
Boy, do you have a lot to learn about the meaning of pro 2A.

In the meantime, enjoy yourself, I am


I was thinking that about you 'Zumbo'...

himurax13
08-23-2012, 3:30 PM
Lets see how long this discussion can remain civil before the fanboys come in and ruin the show.

Here's my question to the assembly on Calguns:how many gun owners standardize to one platform that they are good at shooting?

I used to own a staple of DA/SA weapons which worked competently and shot well for their purpose, but I reached a point where I just couldn't extract any more practical accuracy out of them. Ergnomic issues related to the grip and the DA pull kept ruining my shooting sessions.

I picked up a 1911 recently, and have now 'standardized' to that platform of weapon for my pistol shooting. Ive realized I can actually enjoy my sessions more instead of looking at my target in frustration. Understand that I'm not crusading for everyone to sell their Glocks and Sigs for Saint Browning's .45 ACP wondergun, but for me that's the right platform for accurate and enjoyable shooting.

Im curious what other brands you guys have standardized to, and why.
;)

I think standardizing is a mistake unless it fits some wierd bugout plan/strategy or if you compete professionally and that is the only one you compete with. Its like only knowing how to drive an automatic and then finding out that in order to ride a motorcycle, you basically have to know how to operate a manual transmission and have a good sense of balance.

I personally believe that it is better to be a Jack of All trades instead of being only good with one platform. I own and use guns in competitions I don't even care for so that I can feel confident with any pistol I pick up if the need arises. Also using different calibers also adds more levels of difficulty to this as well. Any yahoo can shoot a 1911 well but it takes a bit more practice and skill to shoot a DA/SA pistol well.

sholling
08-23-2012, 3:35 PM
I've mostly standardized on not standardizing but I've built my collection over 30+ years :p. I have four 1911s in 45acp for range, home defense, and carry where legal - those are my favorites. I also have 3 S&W M&Ps in three calibers (9, 40 & 45) and want a M&P45c if they ever become legal here. The full sized M&P45 lives next to my bed. I have 22s, a 380, 9mm, 38spl, 357, 40S&W, and 45acp. Once you master the 1911 manual of arms you find it works for almost (almost because a pistols have backwards safeties) all semi automatics. I mean so what if my thumb sweeps a safety that isn't there the pistol still goes boom and the muscle memory is in place for my 1911.

Where standardizing makes darn good sense is for families. It's a really nice thing if a couple's weapons share a common cartridge and magazines.

whipkiller
08-23-2012, 3:38 PM
Now that I'm a married man, I have "Standardized" to one woman because she frowns upon me playing with other women.

My guns on the other hand do not get jealous if I shoot one, then another, or for the occasional craziness even double-wield ;) so why not enjoy a little variety?

Tjfearl
08-23-2012, 3:50 PM
I have a S&W M&P 40 full size and compact. I have a 9mm barrel for each of them. And the full size mags are interchangeable with the compact. I like my system.

fighterpilot562
08-23-2012, 4:01 PM
I like to mix it up, different calibers, different models and so on

scglock
08-23-2012, 4:37 PM
I try to have a little of everything. Different actions, different calibers, and sizes. I need to add a .40 to my collection

WootSauce
08-23-2012, 5:06 PM
For the most part, for comeptition (as of now, I'll move into major sooner or later) and HD/SD/Carry I standardize calibers. Everything is 9mm. Now, that doesn't mean I don't own other calibers, I do, I just dont use them for HD/SD/Carry. Also, just the way it happened, my competition, HD and Carry guns are all Glocks. But I'm changing everything over to HK's (I just bought the Glocks first, I had a thing for the FDE frame ones :43:)

Oceanbob
08-23-2012, 5:42 PM
I like to mix it up, different calibers, different models and so on

This..^^^

One factor is that reloading your own ammo gives you more options.

SilverTauron
08-23-2012, 5:48 PM
I think standardizing is a mistake unless it fits some wierd bugout plan/strategy or if you compete professionally and that is the only one you compete with. Its like only knowing how to drive an automatic and then finding out that in order to ride a motorcycle, you basically have to know how to operate a manual transmission and have a good sense of balance.


I did not come to this decision flippantly.

3 months ago I owned a Beretta 92F ,a S&W 5906,and a Sig 2022. All notable weapons on their own merits, but I set out on a summer goal to do something much harder than evaluate hardware-improving my own skillset. I committed to 100 rounds a week through each weapon to improve my trigger skill and shooting ability.

By the middle of July, id come to a realization about DA/SA guns -they work well with practice as long as the weapon ergonomically fits the shooter to a T. Since no two DA/SA weapons have identical trigger position and grip types, there's no consistent way for me to shoot different DA/SA weapons well that works from one gun to another.While 1911s , HiPowers, and Glock have very similar ergonomics a DA/SA weapon shares nothing in common with another firearm besides the trigger action. Shooting a Beretta 92F was childs play for me using the power joint, while getting hits with the Sig required a modified grip using the pad of my finger. Shooting my 3rd Gen Smith required an entirely different trigger position with me using the tip of my trigger finger, otherwise using the pad or the crease caused the weapon to shift position in the DA trigger stroke.

Then we come to the SINGLE ACTION trigger pulls of each gun, and the problem is compounded threefold. A single action press on the Beretta won't get good hits with the Sig, and a Sig Pro friendly press causes flinched shots with my Smith.

Consequently, learning each weapon well enough to be a "jack of all trades" inevitable meant being a master of none of them. I could pick one pistol to use as my carry/practice weapon with the consequence of dooming myself to incompetence shooting the other two.Its akin to going to a club and seeing a group of 3 hot women together at the bar-you have to pick one to the exclusion of the other chicks, or you'll go home alone trying to turn them into a foursome.

I do not doubt there is a man or lady out there in America who has a revolver, a Glock, a 1911, and a Beretta who can shoot all 4 well. Those people have more time and money than I do to go shooting. For me, owning several firearms of different types means concentrating on one to the exclusion of my ability to shoot the others which thus defeats the point of owning them.




I personally believe that it is better to be a Jack of All trades instead of being only good with one platform. I own and use guns in competitions I don't even care for so that I can feel confident with any pistol I pick up if the need arises. Also using different calibers also adds more levels of difficulty to this as well. Any yahoo can shoot a 1911 well but it takes a bit more practice and skill to shoot a DA/SA pistol well.


Let it be clarified now that not just any yahoo can shoot a 1911 well. No gun fits all people well, and there are experienced shooters who choose Glock and other platforms because its easier for them. Saint Browning's .45 ACP just happens to be MY platform. ;)

Another , perhaps more vital point-all of us have different priorities and stages in life which determines the amount of time and effort we can devote to shooting and firearm selection. In an ideal world we could live the life of a Delta force operator, who is paid to shoot for 8 hours a day . In reality, we have bills to pay and responsibilities to attend to. A husband and father should look after his family and job before his gun collection, while a single guy blowing his beer money on ammo may have more time to work with at the range. Still, the retiree with a steady pension, money in the bank, and all the time in the world may have the ability to shoot however and whenever they wish, with the concordant ability to become proficient with guns in ways the busy single man and the working father and husband can only envy.

Accordingly, the individual must determine the time they can devote to shooting and make their choices for structuring their collection. Setting aside the sheer joy I have shooting the 1911, its logical that a college age man such as myself should make the most of my paltry $100 monthly ammo allowance shooting one type of weapon, instead of handicapping myself with learning multiple platforms which require a greater ammo and range expense to learn. I wouldn't dare suggest a retiree with thousands of dollars of disposable income limit himself in the way I have to.

The risk that happens when one collects guns they can't afford to shoot, is that they wind up being equally proficient with everything in the safe-this is to say, they aren't proficient at all . One of my NCO supervisors in the Air Force has enough guns to weigh down a small Uhaul trailer, and yet my novice self with 2 years of trigger time could outshoot him. Being equally skilled with all my guns is useless if that skill level is zero.

elSquid
08-23-2012, 6:18 PM
Accordingly, the individual must determine the time they can devote to shooting and make their choices for structuring their collection. Setting aside the sheer joy I have shooting the 1911, its logical that a college age man such as myself should make the most of my paltry $100 monthly ammo allowance shooting one type of weapon, instead of handicapping myself with learning multiple platforms which require a greater ammo and range expense to learn.

*cough* Ruger 22/45 22LR rimfire *cough*

-- Michael

sholling
08-23-2012, 6:49 PM
Accordingly, the individual must determine the time they can devote to shooting and make their choices for structuring their collection. Setting aside the sheer joy I have shooting the 1911, its logical that a college age man such as myself should make the most of my paltry $100 monthly ammo allowance shooting one type of weapon, instead of handicapping myself with learning multiple platforms which require a greater ammo and range expense to learn. I wouldn't dare suggest a retiree with thousands of dollars of disposable income limit himself in the way I have to.
I agree with the above poster - invest in a 22/45 or a Browning Buck Mark. I do 90% of my shooting with a 22 because it's what I can afford and both of those closely mirror the ergonomics of a 1911. I recommend the Buck Mark Standard URX but I've found that my Buck Mark Micro URX fits in my 1911 Commander leather fairly well. It may not look like a 1911 but it feels like one.

http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/images/images-by-title-name/Buck-Mark-Standard-URX-MID-051407-m.jpg
Buck Mark Standard URX

drdarrin@sbcglobal.net
08-23-2012, 6:58 PM
If you can call it a "standard", my go-to-guns are all DAO; two are Beretta's, one is a Sig P239. None of them have mag safeties or external safeties on any kind. These are the ones that we keep readily accessible. All are point and shoot.

I still have the usual DA/SA Sigs and one Beretta that I will probably never sell. They are still fun to shoot. One of these days, I'll get to shoot a non-range owned Glock. I might like it.

Whatisthis?
08-23-2012, 7:48 PM
Well, shooting is a hobby, not a necessity for me, so I have several calibers and several brands. I even have a black powder replica (yet to shoot :( ).

I'm in it for fun, not practicality or work, so I see no point in standardizing.

For me it's like "Which genre of book or movie do you want to standardize to?". None, I like variety.

Also I don't want to standardize one "manual of arms" I want to know how everything works and practice with them all.

That's my opinion anyway.

+1

Except as a college student I only have 9mm and .22 now (and a .38 special I inherited). I still won't standardize to a single anything once I start purchasing more. I love my Glock, Sig, revolver, and .22 pistol. Standardizing to the same manual of arms does very little for me.

C.W.M.V.
08-23-2012, 7:51 PM
I standardize to calibers, but not guns. I like the most common in-use, especially if police and military use them.

Same here. Im converting everything to 7.62x39. Im still keeping the Saiga AK-74 (my wifes rifle of choice) and my M16A1 (given to me) but all else is going to 7.62x39 and .45 acp.

shooting4life
08-23-2012, 8:43 PM
I standardized to awesome.
http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu30/shooting4life/0b01deb9.jpg
http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu30/shooting4life/_MG_3066.jpg
http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu30/shooting4life/46fb4153.jpg
http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu30/shooting4life/89978a84.jpg
http://i630.photobucket.com/albums/uu30/shooting4life/ccb9ea36.jpg

Fadedline
08-23-2012, 8:51 PM
:iagree:

NickZag
08-23-2012, 11:44 PM
Standardization is a nice, but I shoot a variety of different platforms in a variety of calibers. It's like asking a parents to pick they're favorite child lol

PerfectReset
08-24-2012, 12:17 AM
I think it's simply a matter of what an individual is looking for in a firearm or gun collection. Standardizing doesn't make much sense if you are an enthusiast that wants to establish a diverse portfolio. Standardization makes a lot of sense for those looking to be extremely proficient in the handling and shooting of a firearm for competition, career (i.e. law enforcement/military), or for someone that collects a common platform (i.e. Winchester, Colt, Glock, 1911 Platform, etc). The reason the firearm community is so large and the reason a thread like this can become so contentious is because guns appeal to folks for different reasons. Cheers.

451040
08-24-2012, 12:48 AM
I've standardized my pistols since '95. All Glock all the time. G21 G20 G27

KandyRedCoi
08-24-2012, 2:32 AM
"standardizing" is not the correct word :p

although i love and prefer to shoot 1911's im probably gonna end up with more than just ONE type of gun

i tried just "standardizing" to 1911's but they all pretty much feel and shoot the same i love them to death but sometimes you need a little bit of variety, a large portion of my handgun collection will probably consist of 1911's but im not gonna stop there

i also tried "standardizing" on AMMO but that gets boring too, what i do is stock up on the "common" calibers and will slowly add boxes of the "not-so-common" calibers

variety is key

Shenaniguns
08-24-2012, 5:32 AM
What is this misconception of standardizing making you lousy on other platforms? It's about being really good on one platform :D

Horton Fenty
08-24-2012, 6:17 AM
I don't see more advantages than limitations by standardizing on one platform or cartridge.

hossb7
08-24-2012, 7:44 AM
There is nothing wrong with owning a diverse collection, but I think DocGKR hit the nail on the head with this post:

After having gone through the juvenile collector stage of idiotically wasting money by purchasing one or two of every type of service pistol ever produced, I finally grew-up and realized it is far better to strive to master one quality pistol type, then be perpetually mediocre with many.

Shenaniguns
08-24-2012, 8:05 AM
There is nothing wrong with owning a diverse collection, but I think DocGKR hit the nail on the head with this post:


High 5 to you good sir! :43:

DRAB_81
08-24-2012, 8:22 AM
There is nothing wrong with owning a diverse collection, but I think DocGKR hit the nail on the head with this post:

I was about to type out a big 'ol lengthy response, but it would have just been a slower, less eloquent way of saying the same thing DocGKR said. Thanks for posting that.


.

redcliff
08-24-2012, 8:46 AM
I certainly disagree that having a diverse collection is an idiotic waste of money. I like being familiar and proficient with every different type of firearm action and even having representative samples of most and multiple variations of some.

I think it's only naturally though to spend the most time, effort and money shooting the ones that you prefer. And how will you know what you prefer unless you've tried the others?

JackRydden224
08-24-2012, 8:49 AM
I'm trying to build a solid collection of 1911s since I like 1911s. They are easy to shoot and easy to clean. I have other semiautos on the side to get a different taste every now and then.

InGrAM
08-24-2012, 8:58 AM
I certainly disagree that having a diverse collection is an idiotic waste of money. I like being familiar and proficient with every different type of firearm action and even having representative samples of most and multiple variations of some.

I think it's only naturally though to spend the most time, effort and money shooting the ones that you prefer. And how will you know what you prefer unless you've tried the others?

^ This hit the nail on the head.

I couldn't have said it better so I won't try.

DRAB_81
08-24-2012, 9:19 AM
I certainly disagree that having a diverse collection is an idiotic waste of money. I like being familiar and proficient with every different type of firearm action and even having representative samples of most and multiple variations of some.

I think it's only naturally though to spend the most time, effort and money shooting the ones that you prefer. And how will you know what you prefer unless you've tried the others?

You seem to have missed something. He said that he went through a stage of buying & shooting all kinds of handguns before having an epiphany. I have done the same. That's how we know what we like.

I guess what it really boils down to, is your core purpose for owning handguns. If its just a hobby for you, I don't see any problem with a diverse collection.

greybeard
08-24-2012, 9:22 AM
I think, if you are only going to own only a few handguns stanardining on on style might make sense. if you are going to own 30+, how many of one style can you own. There is not that much different is there in say the 1911 platform, or Glocks, or even Sigs.

gorenut
08-24-2012, 9:23 AM
Only thing I've really "standardized" is calibers. All my semis are 9mm. Though I still do plenty of revolver and rim fire shooting. I do try to get most my triggers to be similar. I've gotten rid of all my DA/SA handguns and my Glock has a (-) connector with NY1 spring to make it feel more like a short and smooth revolver DA. Other than that.. variety is the spice of life.. and its especially fun with guns. I like to be familiar with multiple firearms but I still do most my shooting with my Glock.

Shenaniguns
08-24-2012, 9:35 AM
I certainly disagree that having a diverse collection is an idiotic waste of money. I like being familiar and proficient with every different type of firearm action and even having representative samples of most and multiple variations of some.

I think it's only naturally though to spend the most time, effort and money shooting the ones that you prefer. And how will you know what you prefer unless you've tried the others?


Nobody says not to try them out first to figure out what you'd like to standardize on.

redcliff
08-24-2012, 9:42 AM
You seem to have missed something. He said that he went through a stage of buying & shooting all kinds of handguns before having an epiphany. I have done the same. That's how we know what we like.

I guess what it really boils down to, is your core purpose for owning handguns. If its just a hobby for you, I don't see any problem with a diverse collection.

My comment was in regard to DocGKR calling a diverse collection both "childish" and "idiotic". While he's welcome to his opinion, so am I.

And while I'm glad you don't see a problem with a diverse collection as long as "its just a hobby", it's possible to be both a collector and a proficient shooter. Not everyone shares the same time and financial constraints.

Let me try to put things in perspective. Many of you buy at least one or two handguns (or more) per year. Once you realize that it's better to buy quality firearms you tend not to sell them; you bought them for a reason and they're not easy to replace, especially older pre-mim models without extraneous lawyer designed safety devices and with old school craftmanship and finishes no longer available. Now imagine having done that each year for 38 years or longer. Your collection will tend to get both large and diverse, with multiple variations of those firearms that interest you. That doesn't prevent you from specializing in the platform that you shoot best and training with it while picking up other firearms along the way.

cindynles
08-24-2012, 10:05 AM
It's your money, spend it how you choose. Personally I will never sell another handgun (several years ago I let a 6" Dan Wesson 744VH slip away and I still miss it). If I buy one and don't shoot it much, it can sit in the safe (they don't eat anything). I tend to shoot 80% of my rounds through 2 (1911 and Glock 17), but I enjoy shooting my other handguns as the mood hits me.

I also enjoy having several types of platforms available to introduce new shooters to the sport. I've found one of the best ways to do this is to let them try different handguns. A 1911 (my current favorite) is not a good starter pistol for a new shooter, but an L-Frame S&W with powder-puff 38 special loads is a great way to build confidence. I couldn't do that if I didn't own several different types of handguns.

A bad first experience at the range can easily turn someone off to the sport. But a fun first experience can create a new lifelong shooter. I enjoy shooting handguns and I want to share that with new shooters, so I have a diverse collection that keeps growing as by budget allows.

DRAB_81
08-24-2012, 10:06 AM
My comment was in regard to DocGKR calling a diverse collection both "childish" and "idiotic". While he's welcome to his opinion, so am I.

And while I'm glad you don't see a problem with a diverse collection as long as "its just a hobby", it's possible to be both a collector and a proficient shooter. Not everyone shares the same time and financial constraints.

Let me try to put things in perspective. Many of you buy at least one or two handguns per year. Once you realize that it's better to buy quality firearms you tend not to sell them; you bought them for a reason and they're not easy to replace, especially older pre-mim models without extraneous lawyer designed safety devices and with old school craftmanship and finishes no longer available. Now imagine having done that for 38 years or longer. Your collection will tend to get both large and diverse, with multiple variations of those firearms that interest you. That doesn't prevent you from specializing in the platform that you shoot best and training with it while picking up other firearms along the way.

I think you're misunderstanding what I'm saying, and that we aren't too far off from each other on this. We aren't on the exact same page, but not polar opposites either.

Striker
08-24-2012, 10:17 AM
Lets see how long this discussion can remain civil before the fanboys come in and ruin the show.

Here's my question to the assembly on Calguns:how many gun owners standardize to one platform that they are good at shooting?

I used to own a staple of DA/SA weapons which worked competently and shot well for their purpose, but I reached a point where I just couldn't extract any more practical accuracy out of them. Ergnomic issues related to the grip and the DA pull kept ruining my shooting sessions.

I picked up a 1911 recently, and have now 'standardized' to that platform of weapon for my pistol shooting. Ive realized I can actually enjoy my sessions more instead of looking at my target in frustration. Understand that I'm not crusading for everyone to sell their Glocks and Sigs for Saint Browning's .45 ACP wondergun, but for me that's the right platform for accurate and enjoyable shooting.

Im curious what other brands you guys have standardized to, and why.
;)
To me, it depends on what you're talking about here. If you're talking about carry and training guns; I don't personally think it's a great idea to have a huge rotation. The reasons are obvious and have already been covered in this thread. However, you can't have one gun for everything. Sometimes a Glock 19 isn't discrete enough, so maybe you also need a J frame or something of similar size. Which is not to say that you should constantly rotate between a Glock, a 1911, a Sig and a Jframe for carry and training. A collection is a different thing. Nothing wrong with having them if you want them and can afford them. And I know what DocGKR says about collecting, but I don't agree with him. Nothing wrong with his stance, it just doesn't work for me.

And if I may ask, when you say " I used to own a staple of DA/SA weapons which worked competently and shot well for their purpose, but I reached a point where I just couldn't extract any more practical accuracy out of them", what exactly does this mean? I understand you like the 1911, but the Sig P226, Beretta M9 and every HK I've shot have been as accurate as any handgun I've ever shot including a Springfield TRP, which is saying something. So I'm curious as to what you're thinking.

I think standardizing is a mistake unless it fits some wierd bugout plan/strategy or if you compete professionally and that is the only one you compete with. Its like only knowing how to drive an automatic and then finding out that in order to ride a motorcycle, you basically have to know how to operate a manual transmission and have a good sense of balance.

I personally believe that it is better to be a Jack of All trades instead of being only good with one platform. I own and use guns in competitions I don't even care for so that I can feel confident with any pistol I pick up if the need arises. Also using different calibers also adds more levels of difficulty to this as well. Any yahoo can shoot a 1911 well but it takes a bit more practice and skill to shoot a DA/SA pistol well.

I use to think this way as well and I see your point, but you really only need a certain amount of this before you have the diversity of skill you're looking for. Last year I shot 10,000 or so rounds; this year, I've shot around 16,000 rounds to date. What I learned is that I don't need to be training on several pistols anymore. I understand the 1911, Sig, HK, Glock, Beretta and M&P really well now, so I'm beyond the I want to familiarize myself with everything stage. What I have found is shooting one type of gun gives you a certain comfort level that you can't achieve if you keep switching guns. I'm not saying one type is better than another. That's completely up to you. And the other thing that I've recently learned is the one you like the most isn't necessarily the one you run the best. Running drills against a clock will tell you a lot about how well you actually run a certain gun and a certain caliber. It's very enlightening for a serious shooter.

redcliff
08-24-2012, 10:17 AM
It's your money, spend it how you choose. Personally I will never sell another handgun (several years ago I let a 6" Dan Wesson 744VH slip away and I still miss it). If I buy one and don't shoot it much, it can sit in the safe (they don't eat anything). I tend to shoot 80% of my rounds through 2 (1911 and Glock 17), but I enjoy shooting my other handguns as the mood hits me.

I also enjoy having several types of platforms available to introduce new shooters to the sport. I've found one of the best ways to do this is to let them try different handguns. A 1911 (my current favorite) is not a good starter pistol for a new shooter, but an L-Frame S&W with powder-puff 38 special loads is a great way to build confidence. I couldn't do that if I didn't own several different types of handguns.

A bad first experience at the range can easily turn someone off to the sport. But a fun first experience can create a new lifelong shooter. I enjoy shooting handguns and I want to share that with new shooters, so I have a diverse collection that keeps growing as by budget allows.

Good post and illustrative of why it's both fun and helpful to have a diverse collection.

I think you're misunderstanding what I'm saying, and that we aren't too far off from each other on this. We aren't on the exact same page, but not polar opposites either.

I probably am misunderstanding; I'd buy you a beer but I can't find the emoticon we used to have for it :) Edit: Cindynles found it for me! Thank you :cheers2:

The War Wagon
08-24-2012, 10:26 AM
I used to belong to the "Pistol of the Week Club" when I was younger. I think it's the novelty of being 21, and being able to buy them for the first time. Had all MANNER and TYPES of pistols in 9mm, .40, 10mm and .45 in my early/mid-20's.

After 9/11, I decided to standardize on pistol type and caliber - with 1911's in .45 - for a number of reasons.

- popularity in America: parts, mags, and ammo, are not likely to run out anytime, soon.
- ease of operation, carry (I'm a big guy), and availability of accoutrements for the 1911
- availabilty of mags - anti's may get around to banning 8 round 1911 mags eventually, but it'll be LONG after full capacity doublestack mags have been banned/confiscated! :o

All this, and I wanted to dedciate my time and effort to rifles, especially AR-15's, as they are a primary weapon, as opposed to pistols, which are historically back-up weapons. There is a REASON why they outfit the infantry with rifles, instead of pistols!

cindynles
08-24-2012, 10:29 AM
I'd buy you a beer but I can't find the emoticon we used to have for it :)

This one?

:cheers2:

liketoshoot
08-24-2012, 10:41 AM
Answer to the OP; http://www.leverguns.com/articles/taylor/best.htm

KandyRedCoi
08-24-2012, 10:47 AM
I certainly disagree that having a diverse collection is an idiotic waste of money. I like being familiar and proficient with every different type of firearm action and even having representative samples of most and multiple variations of some.

I think it's only naturally though to spend the most time, effort and money shooting the ones that you prefer. And how will you know what you prefer unless you've tried the others?

^thats exactly how i feel as well thanks for the write up

BrassCase
08-24-2012, 10:53 AM
I thought I was going to standardize to one caliber, 40 S&W as I have a Beretta PX4 and a CZ75B-SA and I like 40 cal. Then I got a C & R license and was able to get a new Walther P-01 (P38) 9 mm and a used CZ72 in 9MM Makrov. The Walther is a Safe Queen just because I always wanted one, got it new and I don't want it to get F'd up. The CZ 72 gets shot just because it is easy, the cheap ammo and it is very accurate. But my favorites have been the two 40's.

Then I screwed up. I wanted a Sig 226 in 40, I went to the gun store to find one and low and behold they had a new 226 Mk25 Navy. To be true to the premise that it is the exact duplicate of the Seal 226 it only comes in 9mm and it came home with me yesterday!

So now I've blown my almost only 40 cal daily shooter plan. I did keep some 9 x 19 ammo around for the Walther's occasional outings, now I'm going to need more, a lot more.

So my new plan is to stick to pistols where the ammo is readily available. Of course, plans can change. No offense meant, but to me a collection of just 1911's would be boring.

Squid
08-24-2012, 12:19 PM
I believe at least a 6" lonewolf .40 barrel will work on that gun, in addtion to threaded barrels.


That way you got a Glock19, which is pretty much the default HD/carry gun or you can upgrade to .40, and get in lots of practice with the .22lr barrel.

Plus, 3 very common calibers for long term ammo supply if SHTF.


For one caliber it would be hard to beat .38s/.357 since some guy makes nice 1911 in .357, and you got everything from excellent snubbies to 6" revolvers to 20+" lever actions....plus the Desert Eagle in 6" and 10" (Ive heard the DE is best in .357)


PS-Ruger makes SA revolvers in extra long barrels in .22lr/22mag and in .44mag. Being as .357 benefits greatly from longer barrels, I'd really like to see Blackhawk .357/9mm convertible in a 10.5" barrel, with a "hunter" barrel for scope. I wouldn't mind seeing a Ruger 100 in 10.5" either. I would mind seeing Ruger 100 or 101 in .357/9mm convt, either.

.45 ftw!
08-24-2012, 12:39 PM
Now that I think about it, all of mine are striker-fired. No external safeties. If it's loaded and I pull the trigger it goes bang. Period. No matter which one I'm using, it's the same as the last. That's just me.

SilverTauron
08-24-2012, 1:04 PM
And if I may ask, when you say " I used to own a staple of DA/SA weapons which worked competently and shot well for their purpose, but I reached a point where I just couldn't extract any more practical accuracy out of them", what exactly does this mean? I understand you like the 1911, but the Sig P226, Beretta M9 and every HK I've shot have been as accurate as any handgun I've ever shot including a Springfield TRP, which is saying something. So I'm curious as to what you're thinking.




Nearly every handgun sold is more accurate than its buyer . I'm not exception to the rule, hence my statement of *practical* accuracy. The difference between a bench rest and what can be done offhand is the human element, and part of that is user ergonomics and trigger skill. If the weapon fits the hand well you can extract much greater real world accuracy out of it then if you have to fight yourself to shoot it.

My intent was not to say any one weapon is more accurate than another.

shipwreck
08-24-2012, 1:25 PM
I've owned everything under the sun at one time or another. Got the Beretta bug again a few years back (robably 4 years ago, by now). STarted shooting them more and more, and everything else less and less.

Started selling some guns to buy more Berettas, one by one... Even preferred it to 1911s after a while... I know how to strip and replace parts, which is very easy on the 92. And, the way the feel in my hand in a 1 handed grip slowly became my favorite...

Sold two high end 1911s last year (one was a $3000 gun). Having 1 platform makes practicing with any one of these 92 variants the same as if I practiced with any or all of them. And, its nice to have so many magazines that fit between guns...

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g320/mistershipwreck/9-wheel-o-berettacopy.jpg

tbc
08-24-2012, 1:31 PM
Nearly every handgun sold is more accurate than its buyer . I'm not exception to the rule, hence my statement of *practical* accuracy. The difference between a bench rest and what can be done offhand is the human element, and part of that is user ergonomics and trigger skill. If the weapon fits the hand well you can extract much greater real world accuracy out of it then if you have to fight yourself to shoot it.

My intent was not to say any one weapon is more accurate than another.

I think shootability is a better description as opposed to the term accuracy.

I simply could not standardize my guns. It would be too boring. But that's just me.

Gary13
08-24-2012, 3:00 PM
Not too long ago I believed in diversity, so I had a XD9 Service, CZ SP01, Sigs 226 and 220, and 3 1911's(RIA Tactical, Kimber Tactical, SA Loaded Commander). I started doing USPSA with the CZ and sometimes the RIA. I then purchased my first Glock, a 34. I have decided to standardize to Glocks for competition because I shoot them well, (which was weird because prior to the 34 I never liked them), so I sold the XD9 and CZ as well as the RIA and purchased a Gen 4 21 to be used in Limited 10 Major. I just shot that for the first time last night and love it. So now I have standardized to:

Competition: Glocks
HD: Sig 220 and 226
Because I will always own one: My two 1911's
And I purchased two wheel guns because everyone needs a revolver

Eventually I want to CCW, so then I will have to decide which way to go. Probably a revolver and then...?

Euphoria526
08-24-2012, 3:35 PM
I've standardized myself to CZ's 9.mm and 40 s&w.
For me it's about follow up shots. Lol

JTROKS
08-24-2012, 4:04 PM
I standardize my handguns as a minimum to being able to chamber any one or two of the following calibers: 22LR, 380ACP, 38spl, 9mm Parabellum, 38Sup, 357mag, 40S&W, 10mm, 45ACP, 44Mag, 454 Casull.

Bobby Ricigliano
08-24-2012, 4:47 PM
All my handguns are in 9mm and .45 ACP. Thats as standardized as I'm going to get.