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littlejake
08-15-2012, 10:52 AM
When I have my G17; and lets assume I've cleared it and the mag is out for safety -- if I rack the slide, what is the condition of the striker? Is is set so the trigger linkage can pull it back and release it like a DA system? Or, is the striker fully cocked? (seems like that cannot be so, or the trigger pull would be shorter.)

Lead Waster
08-15-2012, 10:57 AM
The striker is halfway to full cocked. Like if you had a slingshot. If the stiker is just fired, it's a limp slingshot band. When you rack the slide, it's like you are now pulling the slingshot band halfway to your ear. When you pull the trigger, you are pulling the band to your ear and then letting go to fire the shot.

Racking it helps lighten the trigger's job of bringing the striker all the way back.

If you prefer, imagine you are weight lifting and doing the "clean and jerk". Racking the slide is like lifting the weight up to your shoulders, then pulling the trigger is when you "jerk" and push the weight up above your head, ready to drop it to the ground.

ZirconJohn
08-15-2012, 11:01 AM
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littlejake
08-15-2012, 12:13 PM
Ok, between Lead Waster and the animation, I've got it. Thanks,

Kindest regards,

Jake

tal3nt
08-15-2012, 12:50 PM
The striker is halfway to full cocked. Like if you had a slingshot. If the stiker is just fired, it's a limp slingshot band. When you rack the slide, it's like you are now pulling the slingshot band halfway to your ear. When you pull the trigger, you are pulling the band to your ear and then letting go to fire the shot.

Racking it helps lighten the trigger's job of bringing the striker all the way back.

If you prefer, imagine you are weight lifting and doing the "clean and jerk". Racking the slide is like lifting the weight up to your shoulders, then pulling the trigger is when you "jerk" and push the weight up above your head, ready to drop it to the ground.

Love the weight lifting example. Just don't "jerk" the trigger

559luke
08-15-2012, 7:14 PM
I know you're asking about your Glock, but for discussion. M&Ps are also striker fired, but the action is a little different. The striker is fully cocked and held by the sear. Pulling the trigger disengages the safeties and then drops the sear releasing the striker. Bang.

five.five-six
08-15-2012, 7:18 PM
http://i321.photobucket.com/albums/nn365/Lurker_Man_Totse/Animated/Glock.gif

9mmepiphany
08-15-2012, 10:09 PM
I know you're asking about your Glock, but for discussion. M&Ps are also striker fired, but the action is a little different. The striker is fully cocked and held by the sear. Pulling the trigger disengages the safeties and then drops the sear releasing the striker. Bang.
You might be thinking about the Springfield Armory XD.

The M&P striker isn't fully cocked either. It isn't as un-cocked as a Glock trigger, but the rearward travel of the trigger causes the sear to cam the striker backwards before releasing it...which makes it functionally the same as a Glock trigger

mrdd
08-16-2012, 11:45 AM
When I have my G17; and lets assume I've cleared it and the mag is out for safety -- if I rack the slide, what is the condition of the striker? Is is set so the trigger linkage can pull it back and release it like a DA system? Or, is the striker fully cocked? (seems like that cannot be so, or the trigger pull would be shorter.)

The striker is under some tension, but not enough to ignite. The striker safety is also engaged. Pulling the trigger increases the tension on the striker and then releases the striker near the end of the trigger travel. The striker safety is also released by the trigger pull.