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View Full Version : Pinning the beaver tail down?


Chaozu
08-12-2012, 3:54 PM
Was wondering if I could get some info from you guys regarding pinning the beaver tail down on your 1911's. What are the pros/cons? Can you do this yourself or does it require a gunsmith? Is this legal(Considering our wacky laws here in Ca?) Any info is greatly appreciated.

Brandon04GT
08-12-2012, 3:56 PM
Sure it's legal...pros/cons are basically just the obvious. Why would you want to do it though?

DSB
08-12-2012, 4:09 PM
I would say that the grip safety is part of the system that makes a 1911 safer. Why would you want to eliminate the grip safety?

redcliff
08-12-2012, 4:11 PM
Since the advent of memory-bump beavertail grip safeties I rarely see or hear of anyone pinning down their safeties anymore.

In the past it was done by some LEO's and others to ensure that with a less than optimal or rushed/improper grip the pistol would fire.

Texas Rangers were known to sometimes tie-down their grip safeties:

http://i1143.photobucket.com/albums/n634/G27RR/STmiller_0730B.jpg

edwardm
08-12-2012, 4:29 PM
Was wondering if I could get some info from you guys regarding pinning the beaver tail down on your 1911's. What are the pros/cons? Can you do this yourself or does it require a gunsmith? Is this legal(Considering our wacky laws here in Ca?) Any info is greatly appreciated.

Depends on the 1911. If you've got a Kimber with the firing pin safety, having the grip safety always depressed will raise the nub that disengages the firing pin safety. Problem there is that you can't take down the pistol (the nub gets caught in front of the firing pin stop). If you forget and force the slide off you can shear that little nub and now your gun is a fancy club.

I'm not sure if it makes a difference on a Series 80 (Colt) 1911 - their FPS setup is different than Kimber's, and I don't have a Series 80 style pistol.

On a Series 70 style it's just going to disable one of the two external safeties. I can't see any reason to do that, though.

I suppose some will argue that JMB's follow-on to the 1911, the HiPower, having no grip safety, is just fine without it. And at least lore (haven't verified, beyond the writings of Jeff Cooper) says that the grip safety was to satisfy US Army requirements, not actual safety concerns. Me, I don't mind it. If you're comfortable with it, have at it. Maybe tape it or rubber band it for a while before making permanent modifications to make sure you like the change.

hkdad
08-12-2012, 5:56 PM
Like this???
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j19/bnitsche/80a78ed3.jpg

SilverTauron
08-12-2012, 6:01 PM
Jeff Cooper pinned his down. Some people's hands cannot engage the web of the grip safety comfortably enough to ensure function. Its your gun, so you are free to modify it as you wish so long as its a range toy/target weapon only. Note for CCW and duty usage disabling any safety device can invoke adverse legal consequences, as you can give opposing counsel an argument to shaft you in court after the incident.

buggsb
08-12-2012, 6:04 PM
Note for CCW and duty usage disabling any safety device can invoke adverse legal consequences, as you can give opposing counsel an argument to shaft you in court after the incident.

This!......

RugerNo1
08-12-2012, 6:17 PM
In competition like USPSA/IPSC, many shooters pin their grip safeties down because they grip their gun so high that they actually work against themselves if the safety is not pinned/disabled.

Or, if a competitor wanted to be a hurry, they would be able to have less than perfect grip and their 1911/2011 would still fire.

Trapper
08-12-2012, 6:28 PM
In the mid 90's I was shooting several pistol matches a month and pinned down the safety on my competition pistols. To pin them down I used a small diameter drill to bore into the top of my mainspring housing, parallel to the main spring. Then I cut a second drill bit of the same diameter to serve as a pin which would lock down the grip safety. It cost nothing and was easily removed. As others have said this should be used only in highly modified competition pistols. Some instructors will verify that all safety devices are functioning before allowing you on the range.

Chaozu
08-12-2012, 7:33 PM
My gun is just a range toy, SA Loaded 9mm, no CCW. I was just curious about it, why someone would do this and so on. Thanks for the input guys.

NewbieDave
08-12-2012, 11:15 PM
You can always do this?

http://www.bunkerphotography.com/Other/1911-Build/i-hCXmKrf/0/L/First-1911-build-165-L.jpg

railroader
08-13-2012, 5:29 AM
My gun is just a range toy, SA Loaded 9mm, no CCW. I was just curious about it, why someone would do this and so on. Thanks for the input guys.
The grip safety can also be adjusted so that it takes very little movement to release it. My kimber is that way. I never have a problem no matter how I grip the gun.

InGrAM
08-13-2012, 5:32 AM
Like SilverTauron said, Jeff Cooper did it. If he did it then I don't see a problem doing it.

jlbflyboy172
08-13-2012, 7:55 AM
Soften the spring to make it easier to engage or simply file off the right corner of the trigger bow so it won't be blocked by the grip safety. It is cheaper to replace and refit a trigger than it is for a grip safety and refitting if you later decided to reverse it.

Sackman1886
08-13-2012, 9:31 PM
You can always do this?

http://www.bunkerphotography.com/Other/1911-Build/i-hCXmKrf/0/L/First-1911-build-165-L.jpg

FANCY! :)