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12GAUGE
08-11-2012, 9:12 PM
I have this Police Positive in.38 that has some cut out in the frame. The serial number dates it to about 1914 and has a X stamped under it.

I am thinking maybe a sales mans model to show the action work?? Any ideas?

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee260/stugots32/DSCN16381.jpg

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee260/stugots32/DSCN16371.jpg

redcliff
08-11-2012, 9:24 PM
Definitely a "cutaway" used for training, could of been used for training gunsmiths or salesmen.

Neat find!

Invisible_Dave
08-11-2012, 9:30 PM
Thats really cool. The grips look really old if not original. Neat gun.

12GAUGE
08-12-2012, 8:27 AM
I found this info, Interesting only 60 made.

To demonstrate the mechanics and special features found on Colt firearms, Samuel Colt introduced cutaway, or skeleton, arms in 1850. The tradition continues to this day, but very few firearms receive such treatment. The model that was cut away the most throughout the company’s history was the Police Positive .38 Model Revolver. Manufactured from 1905 to 1943, approximately sixty Police Positive .38 Models were cut away from a total production run in excess of 200,000. This example, serial number 159941, is cut away to reveal the complexity of the double-action, positive-lock system. The double-action mechanism allowed the user to fire the gun simply by pulling the trigger.

Arkangel
08-12-2012, 8:41 AM
1of 60 out of 200,000? Nice find.

12GAUGE
08-12-2012, 8:55 AM
I think this is worth getting a letter from Colt for to see the history.

redcliff
08-12-2012, 8:58 AM
I think this is worth getting a letter from Colt for to see the history.

I agree if the OP is willing to spend the money. I would imagine if authenticated as original it would be money well spent value wise.

12GAUGE
03-10-2013, 11:21 AM
Received the Colt letter and it was confirmed to be a factory " Skeleton" It did not say what grips were sent with the gun, but I think these are not the original and should be the black hard rubber ones.

John Browning
03-10-2013, 11:28 AM
Received the Colt letter and it was confirmed to be a factory " Skeleton" It did not say what grips were sent with the gun, but I think these are not the original and should be the black hard rubber ones.

Leave it be. Those grips are plausibly correct, and plausibly is good enough.

12GAUGE
03-10-2013, 11:39 AM
Wood were Standard grips in 1923.. So maybe

The Police Positive was made of carbon steel, and was finished with either a polished blued finish or nickel plated.[2] The First issue of the Police Positive ran from the revolver’s introduction in 1907 until 1927. Sporting Colt’s standard hard rubber grips, it was offered with barrel lengths of 2.5 (available only in .32 caliber), 4, 5, and 6 inches, and was chambered for the .32 Long Colt (which would also fit the .32 Short Colt), .32 Colt New Police, and .38 Colt New Police cartridges.[1][2][3][6] Checkered Walnut grips became standard after 1923. The Second issue began in 1928 and ran until 1947, adding a somewhat heavier frame as well as a serrated topstrap to reduce sight glare, while retaining the wooden grips

12GAUGE
03-16-2013, 7:53 PM
Here is some interesting Info Apreantly the gun was shipped to Phil Bekeart who was responsible for the
S&W .22/32 (1911)
The .22/32 Target Model was S&W’s first revolver to fire the .22 Long Rif
le cartridge and is second only to the K-Frame .38 Special M&P in maintaining a continuous line of production through a variety of specific models, variations, and barrel lengths all the way down to the current stainless-steel Model 63. It originated with a San Francisco S&W dealer named Phil Bekeart, who in 1910 special-ordered 1000 revolvers chambered for the .22 LR with six-inch barrels and adjustable target sights built on the “heavy” (for a .22 rimfire) .32 Hand Ejector frame–hence the long-standing “.22/32″ and “Heavy-Frame Target” labels in S&W’s small-frame .22 revolver nomenclature. The four-inch version, the .22/32 Kit Gun introduced in 1936 (“Kit Gun” as in fishing or hunting kit and not “kit” as in to be assembled), has proven one of S&W’s most enduringly popular items and has served as model for dozens of imitations and similar configurations from competing manufacturers. It’s a true continuing classic.


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee260/stugots32/DSCN2054_zpsca5a5925.jpg