PDA

View Full Version : S&W .22 revolver - help


quaildog1
07-30-2012, 10:36 PM
My S&W .22 has the habit of hitting the rim hard enough to cause the empties to become wedged in the cylinder. This didn't use to happen but has gotten worse. They are hard to eject and I sometimes even have to tap the ejector on the bench to get them out. What gives? Suggestions? What's the fix? Thanks.

MiddleKingdom
07-31-2012, 6:25 AM
Is it the rim is becoming lodged? Does this happen as soon as you start shooting with a clean cylinder?

chingdaotze
07-31-2012, 3:02 PM
I had something similar happen when I was using Winchester Xpert HV (sliver box) in my 617... something about that ammo caused empties to get stuck in the cylinder and like you, I had to whack the ejector rod against the bench to get out the casings. Switching ammo fixed the problem for me. No more issues with Federal Bulk Packs or Winchester white box. Had lots of problems with CCI Blazer and the Winchester silver box. I would recommend trying different ammo if you haven't already.

If you're still having problems and you're in Southern California, I highly recommend Alan Tanaka to check out your revolver. He knows his stuff, and did a great job inspecting my 617.

stevie
07-31-2012, 3:46 PM
You may try brushing out the chambers really well. Be sure to clean under the star to remove any unburnt power.

quaildog1
07-31-2012, 4:33 PM
Starts right from the first rounds fired. The pistol is always cleaned and individual chambers in the cylinder are brushed and lubed. I also regularly clean under the star with solvent and a tooth brush. Unfired rounds go into and out of the cylinder very easily until fired. So yeah, it's the rim getting stuck in the cylinder. I tried some different brands - not a lot - and still have the same problem. I thought the Wolf Match Target .22's with their lube would be the ticket but no. Maybe something else will work.

chingdaotze
07-31-2012, 7:24 PM
You lube your chambers O_o? I always thought that was a no-no. Perhaps grease from your chambers could be binding the casings?

quaildog1
07-31-2012, 10:30 PM
Nope, no grease in the cylinder chambers. Only a light oil swab as with almost all metal parts. As I said, the shells go in easily and will eject just as easily if they are not fired. The problem is after they are fired. The rim of the shells are hit hard. Much more so than shells from something like my 10/22.

Rob_G
07-31-2012, 11:12 PM
My 617 has a similar problem with Blazer Bulk Packs but works great with Federal.

Maybe try tapping the cases out one at a time with a small dowel or rod to see if it is one cylinder in particular that is causing the problem?

chingdaotze
08-01-2012, 10:11 AM
This other forum poster seemed to have similar problems:

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=154637

Seems like most people on that forum recommend the gun be taken to a smith. If you've ruled out everything else, I'd have to agree. You can test if it is the hammer by changing out the mainspring:

http://www.gunsprings.com/index.cfm?page=items&cID=3&mID=58

and use an 8-32 screw as a replacement strain screw. I've got this combo in my 617. The strain screw is loctited at the point where it'll reliably ignite the primer and provide a much better DA trigger. Maybe you can find a similar sweet spot for your gun?

sofbak
08-01-2012, 10:53 AM
Has it ever been dry fired? IDK anything about the chamber config on a S&W, but in some .22's, dry firing will allow the pin to strike the edge of the chamber, peening a small lip on the chamber edge. When a cartidge is fired and expands, that small lip takes up all the clearance and obstructs the cartridge removal.

They make a tool called a chamber iron to correct this, but I would advise leaving the repair to an experienced GS. It's one of those procedures where just a little bit too much application can ruin chamber dimensions quickly.

I had a sticky chamber on a rimfire rifle (new and hadn't been dry fired). I ultimately polished the back half of the chamber with a bore mop and some mother's alum polish. It must have been a bit rough, and carbon build up made it sticky.

quaildog1
08-01-2012, 6:17 PM
Thank you for all the info./suggestions. I have owned the gun since it was new and it has never been dry-fired. I know dry-firing can cause cylinder deformation and potentially cases sticking so I don't think that is the case.

I may end up taking it to a gunsmith for this problem - along with some fired cases - and also see about a little trigger work too. Hopefully the empty cases will be a good guide for the GS to make the necessary adjustments. the trigger is pretty good in SA but pretty bad in DA. Make that terrible in DA!

Thanks again for all the input. Now I just need to find a good GS in the Santa Clarita area. Suggestions??

chingdaotze
08-01-2012, 7:38 PM
IMHO the best person in SoCal for S&W revolvers is Alan Tanaka, but he's a bit of ways off for you. Don't really know anyone that far north. Bain and Davis or Jim Hoag?

Let us know how it goes, and good luck!

shafferds
08-07-2012, 4:24 AM
Go to American Gun Works in Glendale. Have 3 gun smiths that will fix the problem.

Corky43
08-07-2012, 6:38 AM
[QUOTE=sofbak;9043539]Has it ever been dry fired? IDK anything about the chamber config on a S&W, but in some .22's, dry firing will allow the pin to strike the edge of the chamber, peening a small lip on the chamber edge. When a cartidge is fired and expands, that small lip takes up all the clearance and obstructs the cartridge removal.

They make a tool called a chamber iron to correct this, but I would advise leaving the repair to an experienced GS. It's one of those procedures where just a little bit too much application can ruin chamber dimensions quickly.QUOTE]

S&W are notorious for this. I am betting this is your problem.

kendog4570
08-07-2012, 6:48 AM
Has it ever been dry fired? IDK anything about the chamber config on a S&W, but in some .22's, dry firing will allow the pin to strike the edge of the chamber, peening a small lip on the chamber edge. When a cartidge is fired and expands, that small lip takes up all the clearance and obstructs the cartridge removal.

They make a tool called a chamber iron to correct this, but I would advise leaving the repair to an experienced GS. It's one of those procedures where just a little bit too much application can ruin chamber dimensions quickly.

I had a sticky chamber on a rimfire rifle (new and hadn't been dry fired). I ultimately polished the back half of the chamber with a bore mop and some mother's alum polish. It must have been a bit rough, and carbon build up made it sticky.

If it has been dry fired in an out-of-time condition, the edge of the chamber mouth can get dimpled, and cause the problem you are having. I made a piloted tool to re-cut the counterbores after the timing is adjusted. The chamber iron will not help in this situation.
Of course, yours could have a completely different problem. No way to tell without seeing it.

quaildog1
08-08-2012, 4:42 PM
Thanks for all the advice and help. I plan to get it to a qualified gunsmith and let them sort it out. I'll let you know what they find and what the solution is. Thanks!