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View Full Version : Slashdot.org coverage of 3D printed lowers


curtisfong
07-26-2012, 11:55 AM
http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/12/07/26/1636254/the-worlds-first-3d-printed-gun

What is interesting about this article is the comments. Quite a bit of non-anti gun sentiment.

njineermike
07-26-2012, 11:57 AM
Love this comment:

Knowing our Congress, they'll try to ban teaching Geometry in schools.

ElvenSoul
07-26-2012, 12:04 PM
Very Nice!

pointedstick
07-26-2012, 12:08 PM
It's amazing that folks took so long to notice. There are probably thousands, if not tens of thousands of DIY hobbyists with simple home-made FDM machines capable of churning out lowers.

Like me (http://techpaladin.com/) :D

curtisfong
07-26-2012, 12:14 PM
Also, take note: there is a reason there aren't many anti-gun comments on /.

Technologists are enamored with technology; they don't care for it when luddites attach emotional characteristics to inanimate technology, especially if the technology is "cool".

This is your future NRA member and gun owner.

1911su16b870
07-26-2012, 12:16 PM
Here is the AR22 pistol link w pic (http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/133514-the-worlds-first-3d-printed-gun).

Untamed1972
07-26-2012, 12:22 PM
Love this comment:

Hey...they're already suspeding kids from school just for drawing pics of guns...dont give them any ideas :rolleyes:

Rust
07-26-2012, 7:43 PM
Haveblue is also a very well regarded airsmith from the old school paintball world. This is making the rounds in those forums as well and there are quite a few of us who both play PB and shoot.

Mesa Tactical
07-27-2012, 8:31 AM
What is interesting about this article is the comments. Quite a bit of non-anti gun sentiment.

What interests me is the suggestion this is the first time it's been done. Not even close.

njineermike
07-27-2012, 8:59 AM
What interests me is the suggestion this is the first time it's been done. Not even close.

That the lower is printed in plastic? From what I know of stereolithographic protoyping, this may well be one of the first due to the inherent weakness of the typical "printed" plastic due to the extrusion or sintering process. Typical "polymer" lowers (or any other part required to withstand any stresses) are injection molded for the highest possible structural strength and dimensional tolerance. Most printed parts are solely for the prototyping and fitup process, after which a mold is machined for mass production.

nick
07-27-2012, 9:14 AM
What bugs me about such articles is the ignorance. They keep talking about "gun licenses", while very few states actually have that idiocy. I blame TV and movies for that - they keep yapping "do you have a license for that" or "it's registered to", like that's something normal. Then again, they usually make shows/movies about crapholes like CA and NYC.

Stonewalker
07-27-2012, 9:17 AM
What interests me is the suggestion this is the first time it's been done. Not even close.

My thoughts exactly

That the lower is printed in plastic? From what I know of stereolithographic protoyping, this may well be one of the first due to the inherent weakness of the typical "printed" plastic due to the extrusion or sintering process. Typical "polymer" lowers (or any other part required to withstand any stresses) are injection molded for the highest possible structural strength and dimensional tolerance. Most printed parts are solely for the prototyping and fitup process, after which a mold is machined for mass production.

I'm sure that these have their inherent weaknesses because of all the reasons you mentioned, but this came up last year -

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:11669

3chSzLxPuzU

njineermike
07-27-2012, 9:26 AM
My thoughts exactly



I'm sure that these have their inherent weaknesses because of all the reasons you mentioned, but this came up last year -

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:11669

3chSzLxPuzU

Interesting. This specific part is actually a milled piece, but I'd still love to find out what type of plastci and what process was used on the printed one. It's a LOT easier to print than to mill.

model63
07-27-2012, 9:35 AM
Cool. Since they won't be able to stop Joe DIY Gunsmith from making his own 3D pictures (lowers) and I doubt they'll be able to regulate sale of these machines making such things, I would think the threat of registration for some other Evil parts might increase....

I've been waiting for that damn porcelain Glock I saw in Die Hard for some time now...I guess I'll have to settle for my homemade 3D plastic one instead.

njineermike
07-27-2012, 9:39 AM
Cool. Since they won't be able to stop Joe DIY Gunsmith from making his own 3D pictures (lowers) and I doubt they'll be able to regulate sale of these machines making such things, I would think the threat of registration for some other Evil parts might increase....

I've been waiting for that damn porcelain Glock I saw in Die Hard for some time now...I guess I'll have to settle for my homemade 3D plastic one instead.

I'm surprised fiber reinforced Delryn isn't being used in more parts as it is. It's the same stuff they make polymer timing gears out of for engines now.

pointedstick
07-27-2012, 4:19 PM
Cool. Since they won't be able to stop Joe DIY Gunsmith from making his own 3D pictures (lowers) and I doubt they'll be able to regulate sale of these machines making such things, I would think the threat of registration for some other Evil parts might increase....

Gun control is truly dead. I've build several 3D printers from simple parts, each one capable of churning out AR lowers and other gun parts. What else are they going to regulate? The barrel? How would they distinguish a smoothbore barrel from a pipe? Guns aren't very complicated, and in the end they're easily reducible to chunks of metal and plastic.

ttboy
07-27-2012, 7:54 PM
Interesting the world's first 3D printed gun.


http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/133514-the-worlds-first-3d-printed-gun

CSACANNONEER
07-27-2012, 8:04 PM
In short, this means that people without gun licenses — or people who have had their licenses revoked — could print their own lower receiver and build a complete, off-the-books gun. What a chilling thought.

This has always been the case. I wonder what the reporter would do if he knew how many homebuilt, off the books, AKs and ARs there already are?

The comments went straight TFH and I had to stop reading them.

FatalKitty
07-27-2012, 8:56 PM
the article says a 3d printer has been used to print drugs?


soooo... it can now synthesize complex chemicals?


shens

BigFatGuy
07-27-2012, 8:58 PM
did you read the link on the word "drugs"?

http://www.geek.com/articles/geek-cetera/researchers-developing-chemputer-that-prints-drugs-20120725/

MikeR
07-28-2012, 3:12 PM
I wonder what the reporter would do if he knew how many homebuilt, off the books, AKs were built at my house.



Fixed lol :D