PDA

View Full Version : Reloading book questions


Colt562
07-21-2012, 6:58 PM
I got some questions that I hope you guys can answer. I have the modern reloading by richard lee...

1. When it says copper played or jacketed bullet, what does that mean? And does that include all types ie round nose full metal jacket

2. It only gives the minimum OAL, should it also give the maximum or is there a known maximum for all loads?

Thanks again

gigante
07-21-2012, 7:29 PM
The difference between plated and jacketed (fmj) is the thickness of the copper covering the lead core. Copper plated is much thinner than copper jacketed. Plated bullest are recommended by mfgs to not exceed 1200 fps. Copper jacketed is not limited in such a way. Jacketed is obviously more expensive. Load data for each will carry with it differing maximum charges.

Minimum overall lengths are listed in order to keep pressures at a safe level. If you seat the bullet too deep, pressure is increased and could result in damage to firearm and/or shooter. Maximum overall lengths are not generally listed. Max lengths will usually be predicated on what your magazine can accomodate or if your cylinder can turn or the bullet is up against rifle lands. Stay above minimum OAL for the given bullet or powder charge and you'll be safe.

Colt562
07-21-2012, 7:38 PM
And how do you go about picking a powder from the list? Would I want to go with the highest velocity or something more in the middle?

XDRoX
07-21-2012, 11:34 PM
And how do you go about picking a powder from the list? Would I want to go with the highest velocity or something more in the middle?

What caliber are you reloading? We'll tell you the best powders to pick.

bumpo628
07-21-2012, 11:59 PM
Jacketed is obviously more expensive.

Not necessarily true. Precision Delta jacketed bullets are cheaper than most plated bullets.

Munk
07-22-2012, 2:36 AM
And how do you go about picking a powder from the list? Would I want to go with the highest velocity or something more in the middle?

Velocity can be a factor, but it's not the only one.

powder choices often come down to price and availability.

Other factors may be cleanliness of burn, load density (how much it fills the case), how well it meters in your powder-measuring device of choice, and how many of your other calibers you can interchange the powder with.

Colt562
07-22-2012, 8:01 AM
I'll be loadin 9mm, 45acp, 308

Bill Steele
07-22-2012, 8:52 AM
One way to pick a start point for a powder in a given caliber and bullet weight is to find a powder in the list that has a wide start and max range weight wise. A wide loading window is nice to have when starting out. Many times this will also be in the group of powders that provide the most velocity and will be among the slower powder candidates.

As Munk said above, there can be many others things to factor in when deciding that don't pertain the its performace in the barrel. In fact, as you get really specific, say you want a very clean burning, target powder that is inexpensive to load in volume, you might select a very fast powder with a heavier bullet that has very little load window, but gives you perfect results in that one application.

Along with the caliber you plan to load, knowing what you want to accomplish (i.e. what weight bullet you fancy, type (jacketed, lead cast, plated), application (SD, target, plain old plinking), etc.) all go into the perfect powder in a given caliber. After all of the above is taken into account, there are probably 4-5 powders that will work perfect in that specific application.

Good luck, have fun.

Sac-AR15
07-22-2012, 10:18 AM
I use W231 and Clays for my 45ACP and 9mm. It's been working out pretty good for me so far.

blockfort
07-22-2012, 10:27 AM
I called Hodgdon and talked to their tech guys. I'm loading for IPSC and IDPA so looking for the softest loads that will let me make power. He recommended Titegroup for 9mm and Clays for 45. Both are working well for me.

If you're loading for max power, they might give you a different recommendation.

Also, some powders are more temperature sensitive, some are more position sensitive (how they burn depending on where they the powder is within the case), some burn faster or slower and that could have different effects depending on caliber and barrel length.

I would say to call them on Monday and have a talk about what you want to do, they're very helpful.

Oh, and for overall length, that's a tricky one because bullets are not all made exactly the same. Minimum does have to do with what I call "airspace" in the case. Maximum is all about feeding reliably in your magazine and gun. Load data should state the recommended length. You may run into a problem with bullets not on the chart though, like the 124gn flat points I use in 9mm. I load them to 1.000! Super short compared to other bullets, but the airspace in the case is the same as a regular 115gn roundpoint.

XDRoX
07-22-2012, 10:27 AM
You can't resll go wrong with W231. It's probably the most popular powder for 9mm.

Personally I like WST for 9mm and 45. I don't think a better powder's out there for 45.

I haven't loaded enough 308 to state a best powder.

hanover67
07-23-2012, 10:53 PM
I used to use a .308 for match shooting. My loads were 40gr of IMR 4064 and a 168gr Sierra matchking bullet for 200 and 300 yards and 42gr. of 4064 and a 190gr Sierra Matchking for 600 yards. I shot the same loads for 20 years and never had a reason to change. Others used IMR 4895 which is similar to the military 7.62mm and .30 caliber loads.

Look at a reloading manual. For each weight bullet several powder types are listed with the "most accurate" indicated in the table. As indicated in the preceeding posts, most people use whatever works for them in their gun, discovered by trial and error.

Colt562
07-23-2012, 11:24 PM
I used to use a .308 for match shooting. My loads were 40gr of IMR 4064 and a 168gr Sierra matchking bullet for 200 and 300 yards and 42gr. of 4064 and a 190gr Sierra Matchking for 600 yards. I shot the same loads for 20 years and never had a reason to change. Others used IMR 4895 which is similar to the military 7.62mm and .30 caliber loads.

Look at a reloading manual. For each weight bullet several powder types are listed with the "most accurate" indicated in the table. As indicated in the preceeding posts, most people use whatever works for them in their gun, discovered by trial and error.

and i wish i could do this but I am on a college student budget so dont really have the money to buy a pound of powder here and there, you know what I mean? :(

LexLuther
07-24-2012, 7:47 AM
answer this....
...
Along with the caliber you plan to load, knowing what you want to accomplish (i.e. what weight bullet you fancy, type (jacketed, lead cast, plated), application (SD, target, plain old plinking), etc.) all go into the perfect powder in a given caliber. ...

If you want a good answer to this...
And how do you go about picking a powder from the list? Would I want to go with the highest velocity or something more in the middle?