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Colt562
07-18-2012, 9:21 PM
I finially ordered my reloading equipment. I wanted something that would kill time when I was bored. I didnt want to break the bank becuase I mainly just wanted to see what reloading was all about and if it would really save me some extra cash. Well right now its doing the opposite, buy the press is the easy part. All the accessories needed break the bank but oh well. So now that I got everything, the press, dies, hand primer, scale, powder funnel, manual is there any tips that you would give a new reloader?

I am mainly going to be reloading 308, 9mm, 45acp, 556.

epcii
07-18-2012, 9:38 PM
When you load for auto rifles, ALWAYS use a small-base die. Pulling 200+ rounds is not fun. Speaking of which, you WILL eventually need a bullet-puller. And a system for cleaning brass.

Colt562
07-18-2012, 9:42 PM
what do you mean small-base die? and yeah i do plan on getting all that stuff

epcii
07-18-2012, 9:45 PM
Instead of the ordinary full-length sizer, use a small-base die. What they do is size the width of a brass a bit smaller as well as bump the shoulder down a little more to ensure reliable feeding. With a regular full-length sizer, I had multiple stuck rounds in the chamber. Very frustrating.

Colt562
07-18-2012, 9:53 PM
ok thanks for the advice

760practicalshooter
07-18-2012, 9:57 PM
LOL! You think you are "saving money"!

Buddy it only makes it so you can shoot more ammo, you're not saving believe me!

It's only begun and it will only get worse.

XDRoX
07-18-2012, 10:02 PM
Sometimes I think I shoot in order to reload more.

Colt562
07-18-2012, 10:11 PM
LOL! You think you are "saving money"!

Buddy it only makes it so you can shoot more ammo, you're not saving believe me!

It's only begun and it will only get worse.
I had a feeling that someone would say that right when i pressed start thread. I do know that I wont save money but I like to tell myself that I will be saving money :p

NoNOS67
07-18-2012, 10:12 PM
When you load for auto rifles, ALWAYS use a small-base die. Pulling 200+ rounds is not fun. Speaking of which, you WILL eventually need a bullet-puller. And a system for cleaning brass.

Or you could start with a small batch and see how they do. I use standard dies and have had no problems in my semi autos.

Dark Mod
07-18-2012, 10:24 PM
Sometimes I think I shoot in order to reload more.

You need to get the brass from somewhere. Plus every time you go to the range you get to bring home more than you left with

OldShooter32
07-18-2012, 10:28 PM
Invest in a chronograph. Basic one is about $100 and you will never know how you are doing until you can clock the bullet speed!

CalTeacher
07-18-2012, 11:00 PM
Read and learn as much as you can, don't be afraid to ask questions if you're not sure about something, and be safe.

Also, buy in bulk to keep your per unit cost down.

Colt562
07-18-2012, 11:11 PM
Ive honestly been researching reloading for about 2 or 3 months and still feel like i have way to much to learn but over time hopefully ill be knowledgable about it

blockfort
07-18-2012, 11:18 PM
I hated the lee hand primer. Now I just use the small one that fits on the challenger press ram. It's more comfortable to use, safer, and has never mis-fed a primer. I've had some go in sideways with the hand primer.

I also just bought a digital scale because the mechanical balance is a pain in the *** and slow.

ExtremeX
07-18-2012, 11:38 PM
I also got on the reloading bandwagon not too long ago.

Small base dies are optional. Most people I know including myself use full length sizing dies for semi auto.

03fatboy
07-19-2012, 8:03 AM
I always see posts about cheap start up cost and we all get creative to save a buck. The bottom line is, there isn't anything cheap about starting out re-loading, if you bought quality components they will last a very long time and in a few years will have forgotten all about the start up cost. Most that reload, enjoy it as a hobby and some are beyond help :D. Good Luck starting out on the right foot ;)

bruceflinch
07-19-2012, 8:20 AM
Start out with the 9mm ammo first to get a feel for the whole process. Read the Manual. Read the Manual. Read the Manual. & don't forget to Read the Manual! Good luck.

Colt562
07-19-2012, 8:32 AM
And thats what I'm doing is starting off with my 9mm and then I'm thinking of moving to 308....since I get 45 and 556 for a very cheap price :)

P.Charm
07-19-2012, 8:56 AM
weird, I haven't had to read the manual. but I haven't really had to. maybe skimmed over it, but everything is self explanatory. The powders I took a look at and even then, it's just the start powder and max. is there something in the manual that I have to really look for?

freonr22
07-19-2012, 9:01 AM
just use a scoop for a powder measure.

TKM
07-19-2012, 9:05 AM
weird, I haven't had to read the manual. but I haven't really had to. maybe skimmed over it, but everything is self explanatory. The powders I took a look at and even then, it's just the start powder and max. is there something in the manual that I have to really look for?

When you take up a hobby that can get you a nickname like "Lefty" or "the dearly departed" you may want to become somewhat more detail oriented.

If not, please post video.

Colt562
07-19-2012, 9:19 AM
just use a scoop for a powder measure.

a scope kind of like the Lee powder scopes? Even if I have a powder funnel that will drop a certain charge that I set it to?

freonr22
07-19-2012, 9:31 AM
sorry, i should have added a sarcasm smiley :D welcome to reloading!

P.Charm
07-19-2012, 9:53 AM
When you take up a hobby that can get you a nickname like "Lefty" or "the dearly departed" you may want to become somewhat more detail oriented.

If not, please post video.

point taken. I guess alot of things I take as no brainer. inspect brass, check powder charge every 5 loads. check OAL check each case length. i move slow because I don't want to be called lefty or the dearly departed.

zfields
07-19-2012, 10:12 AM
You need to get the brass from somewhere. Plus every time you go to the range you get to bring home more than you left with

That's why I bring my girlfriend. No one yells at her for snagging their brass :)

Sent from my Incredible 2 using Tapatalk 2

P.Charm
07-19-2012, 10:24 AM
That's why I bring my girlfriend. No one yells at her for snagging their brass :)

Sent from my Incredible 2 using Tapatalk 2I usually just ask if they are saving their brass and if not can I take it. no one who wasn't saving brass has said no.

Divernhunter
07-19-2012, 11:43 AM
There are days that I spend more time picking up brass than shooting. Then there are days there is no brass to get. Read the book and I mean Lyman #49 as it will explain many things you did not even think about. Forget the scoops. Get a powder measure such as the RCBS Uniflow with both drums and you will be better off. When you are ready the electronic powder despensers/scales are really nice. I hate doing 9mm ammo due to the small size so I finially got a Dillon 650. Much better for 9mm and 45ACP. Did anyone tell you how much you will SAVE? So now I have 2 Dillon 650's(one for rifle and one for 223/308 with all the extras) 2 RCBS presses(rockchucker and a Jr for seating bullets) and a Hornady for my 50bmg's. Then a mechanical scale, electronic scale, electronic despensor/scale. Throw is a tumbler and seperator, brass seperator,case prep center, hand case prep tools, electric and 2 hand case trimmers, graffite(sp) neck luber, various neck and case lube stuff, hammer type bullet puller, collet bullet puller, small dishes for holding bullet, baking pan for spray lubing brass(rifle),case funnels,modified kitchen funnel for powder on uniflow measure, annel wrenches and other tools for adjustments, 3 different primer swagers and 3 different cutters(just get the Dillon super swager),Special tools for the 50bmg stuff, 2 hand primers,2 primer flip trays, extra lube pad and lube(do not use anymore),chrono,150+ plastic ammo boxes,45+ GI ammo cans,shelving for all of the stuff,35+ sets of reloading dies, extra single seater dies set up for barnes bullets and such,6 brass holding trays,29 reloading manuals plus mags and papers copied off the internet, 3 binders with load data & list of loads to test etc, 2 metal benchers I made for the presses and such,78 shoesize plastic boxes for brass/bullets, stuff to cast bullets and lube them,three 5gal pails for unsorted brass and a bunch of other stuff too much to list. Ok---Did I say you will save money?---- Think NOT!

But it is fun.

PS Then you need to buy powder, primers and bullets. Possibly bullets casting equipment and supplies.-----AND----

AAShooter
07-19-2012, 11:48 AM
I am a unLoader!! :D

CaffeinFeign
07-19-2012, 4:21 PM
LOL...i thought it would save me money when I started as well...all I can say is, I am now, at this point, a better shot than I ever have been...:D

Revoman
07-19-2012, 9:07 PM
I might suggest that you start with 45 since 9mm is a high pressure round and the 45 is not. Just a little safety factor for the newb.

Read manuals, start slow, start at minimum loadings and work up from there.

You may wish to write yourself a protocol so that you do not leave out any steps and all is in order.

Good lighting is your friend. Wear safety glasses when handling primers and powder and while loading.

Don't go out of bounds with any recipes until you are more experienced.

M27
07-19-2012, 9:07 PM
I usually just ask if they are saving their brass and if not can I take it. no one who wasn't saving brass has said no.

yep

Unless people want to keep there brass I have never had any one protest to me picking up there brass after asking.

I have even had people pick up there brass and toss it into my ammo can, something I am always thankful for.

Fjold
07-19-2012, 9:26 PM
Best tip:

Read the reloading manual.

Next best tip:

Read the reloading manual again.

Not skim, not glance through it, read it.

In 31 years of reloading for bolt action, pump action, semi-automatic, single shot and double barrel rifles, I've never owned a set of small based dies.

Read the reloading manual and set your sizing dies correctly.

Divernhunter
07-19-2012, 10:49 PM
I started buying small base dies when I got my first pres(Rockchucker) because no matter what I did they would not work well in my old Rem 740 in 30-06. Small base dies cured that problem. The 740 had a weak extraction system. I have used reg dies in other calibers but required SB dies for an AR15 (223) and a Browning BAR 7mm Rem mag but not my Ruger M77 in 7mm Rem mag.. So I have SB and regular dies in several cartridges. I just suggest a new person getting them so that it does away with one potential trouble and they are not forced to get another die since many think reloading will save money. I use SB dies in rifles not requiring them also often. I know they may shorten brass life but I do not try to get 47 loads out of my brass. It works for me. I also have several neck sizing dies but rarely use them.

Colt562
07-19-2012, 11:12 PM
I might suggest that you start with 45 since 9mm is a high pressure round and the 45 is not. Just a little safety factor for the newb.

Read manuals, start slow, start at minimum loadings and work up from there.

You may wish to write yourself a protocol so that you do not leave out any steps and all is in order.

Good lighting is your friend. Wear safety glasses when handling primers and powder and while loading.

Don't go out of bounds with any recipes until you are more experienced.

So should I start with the minimum load for a couple cartiridges and then move up and up and take them to the range and see which one works best for me?

TKM
07-21-2012, 8:05 PM
Load 10 rounds at the lowest level in the book. Write down the load on a piece of paper and put it and the bullets in a baggie. Do this until you have as many different loads as seem appropriate labelled and separated.

Go to the range and line up the baggies from minimum to close to maximum.

Load your first magazine and fire away, make note of your results on the back of the piece of paper. Did they function well? Feed and eject? Accuracy?

When you are done you will have notes on each load and won't have to try to remember what did what later.

There will be some loads that just suck, it is as important to know what doesn't work as well as what does.

There will be a couple of loads that just work better than others. Take them and load fifty of each. After testing this time you will find the load that seems most accurate.

Write it down on a piece of tape and stick it to your loading bench, also put it on a 3x5 card and start keeping a file of your favorite loads. Don't try to do it by memory.

Colt562
07-21-2012, 10:01 PM
Thanks for the advice I'll have to do that