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View Full Version : Home Defense in 1080p


DrDavid
07-11-2012, 2:59 PM
http://i.imgur.com/7rQh9l.jpg

Originally posted on Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/guns/comments/wea8i/home_defense_in_1080p/

Here's where to buy it: http://strikemark.com/products/gopro-glock-mount/

But, in California, since you're recording audio and video in a private location, will you get in trouble under our ridiculous wiretapping laws?

spegull03
07-11-2012, 3:12 PM
"Don't attack me yet, I don't have my camera on!"

tradecraft
07-11-2012, 3:15 PM
GoPro in lowlight conditions? Gooooood luck.

003
07-11-2012, 3:40 PM
http://www.taser.com/products/on-officer-video/taser-cam

An interesting concept; while I am not aware of anyone that has a camera/video on a firearm, the latest generation of LE taser does have live video/audio recording capability. It has proven to be a real benefit to many Police Officers. Excellent evidence to show in court. Just what the bad guy did and said. If you are in your own home and a bad guy enters, I think a real time video recording would be great.

Librarian
07-11-2012, 4:39 PM
One of the reasons I love this place is questions make me look stuff up. (Just how I am.)

So, new resource: http://www.citmedialaw.org/legal-guide/california-recording-law

California Wiretapping Law

California's wiretapping law is a "two-party consent" law. California makes it a crime to record or eavesdrop on any confidential communication, including a private conversation or telephone call, without the consent of all parties to the conversation. See Cal. Penal Code 632. The statute applies to "confidential communications" -- i.e., conversations in which one of the parties has an objectively reasonable expectation that no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation. See Flanagan v. Flanagan, 41 P.3d 575, 576-77, 578-82 (Cal. 2002). A California appellate court has ruled that this statute applies to the use of hidden video cameras to record conversations as well. See California v. Gibbons, 215 Cal. App. 3d 1204 (Cal Ct. App. 1989). Does someone robbing you or threatening you have "an objectively reasonable expectation that no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation"?

California IS weird enough that, in the proper circumstances, one could be justified in shooting someone but NOT allowed to record the event.

ETA probably could get around that with a 'Notice: persons in this location may be subject to video or sound recording' sign. If they enter, they consent.

DrDavid
07-11-2012, 4:56 PM
One of the reasons I love this place is questions make me look stuff up. (Just how I am.)

So, new resource: http://www.citmedialaw.org/legal-guide/california-recording-law

Does someone robbing you or threatening you have "an objectively reasonable expectation that no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation"?

California IS weird enough that, in the proper circumstances, one could be justified in shooting someone but NOT allowed to record the event.

ETA probably could get around that with a 'Notice: persons in this location may be subject to video or sound recording' sign. If they enter, they consent.

Even worse, you can be justified in shooting someone, but go to jail for recording the event with a video recorder.

Honestly, if I'm a crook, I probably DO believe that no one will see or hear me in the commission of the crime. If I did think I'd be seen/heard, I probably would break into some other house.

JON KARGATHALON
07-11-2012, 5:01 PM
Its the privacy of your OWN home,lol not the intruders,lmao! you can do whatever you want in your OWN house!

DrDavid
07-11-2012, 5:04 PM
Its the privacy of your OWN home,lol not the intruders,lmao! you can do whatever you want in your OWN house!

Actually, no. You can't. :)

ptoguy2002
07-11-2012, 5:23 PM
In a HD scenario where you have to use a firearm, really bad idea IMHO.
It sucks, and is horrible, but with a society where attackers can sue their victims and police/government doesn't like people with guns and lawful self defense, the best thing possible is to have your story, and only your story (as told by your attorney).

Connor P Price
07-11-2012, 5:24 PM
IIRC Burris makes a similar product for a rifle mounted application. I'd prefer not to hang something that bulky off the front end of a pistol.

Either way the legal implications are interesting. Do you really want a detailed video of your self defense situation? I'd be concerned that with video it would be to easy for prospective jurors to pick out tiny little things and say, "he could have done this or that to avoid having to shoot." Video gives an accurate representation but it doesn't let you feel the actual life or death adrenaline.

For some reason it seems to me that video would be more likely to harm ones case than to help.

Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk 2

OMGofWar
07-11-2012, 5:27 PM
GoPro in lowlight conditions? Gooooood luck.

yeah you're right! let me also add, if you know GoPro cameras at all, the sound of gunfire is going to be atrocious!! LOL

BBBOBBB
07-11-2012, 5:33 PM
I guess you could place a sign on your property that states your voice and image will be recorded.

Texas Boy
07-11-2012, 5:48 PM
plenty of homes have security systems with cameras that record...I know mine are set up to start recording should an alarm activate. I'm certain security camera recordings have been used to help convict burglars in this state, so I don't see why you holding the camera (with a gun attached) would be any different. But as Librarian pointed out, CA is weird...

Connor P Price
07-11-2012, 5:51 PM
plenty of homes have security systems with cameras that record...I know mine are set up to start recording should an alarm activate. I'm certain security camera recordings have been used to help convict burglars in this state, so I don't see why you holding the camera (with a gun attached) would be any different. But as Librarian pointed out, CA is weird...

Video is not the problem. Audio recording is where things get tricky.

Sent from my SGH-T959 using Tapatalk 2

Carnivore
07-11-2012, 7:30 PM
I recorded my neighbor and their dog that wouldn't shut up and they wouldn't do anything to stop it. Went though the city and the DA. The Ventura DA said it was perfectly legal to video tape and record the sound outside the house as long as the video didn't show the neighbors property or windows etc. The only time it isn't legal is if you have a video/ audio in an area that you don't control like in a neighbors house, rental house or in some way that an expectation of privacy is implied or reasonably believed. Like in night clubs, businesses etc video/audio is perfectly legal. Even video taping a person in your house with out them knowing is perfectly legal. Just ask Kim Kardorkian she lost her case when video taped in an "encounter". Judge threw it out saying (in other words) should have been in your own home.

JON KARGATHALON
07-11-2012, 8:26 PM
Actually, no. You can't. :)

Your telling me, that if someone walks into MY house, and i just so happen to have a camera recording them(in the privacy of my own home) it is illegal?

I spit on that good sir! law or not :)

Dantedamean
07-11-2012, 8:28 PM
If I use my gun to defend my self, the last thing I want is for law enforcement to have a 1080p video to scrutinize the event frame by frame.

MudCamper
07-11-2012, 8:30 PM
Seems like a really bad idea. It will be used against you in a court of law. Even a perfectly legit shoot would be played as gruesome drama to a jury of idiots.

EM2
07-11-2012, 9:12 PM
In a HD scenario where you have to use a firearm, really bad idea IMHO.
It sucks, and is horrible, but with a society where attackers can sue their victims and police/government doesn't like people with guns and lawful self defense, the best thing possible is to have your story, and only your story (as told by your attorney).



Yup, I agree.
Dead men tell no tales

curtisfong
07-12-2012, 9:03 AM
I agree. In any criminal case, by and large, evidence will ALWAYS be used against you. There is almost no such thing as exonerating evidence.

Dreaded Claymore
07-12-2012, 2:18 PM
In a HD scenario where you have to use a firearm, really bad idea IMHO.
It sucks, and is horrible, but with a society where attackers can sue their victims and police/government doesn't like people with guns and lawful self defense, the best thing possible is to have your story, and only your story (as told by your attorney).
Yup, I agree.
Dead men tell no tales

If people get shot and then receive prompt medical attention (which you summoned when you called the police), nine out of ten of them survive.

NotEnufGarage
07-12-2012, 3:39 PM
If I use my gun to defend my self, the last thing I want is for law enforcement to have a 1080p video to scrutinize the event frame by frame.

Exactly. I'd rather have a jury hear my perception of what happen than see a video of something that can be interpreted in several ways.

NotEnufGarage
07-12-2012, 3:41 PM
If people get shot and then receive prompt medical attention (which you summoned when you called the police), nine out of ten of them survive.

I doubt that applies to those who have a few 230 grain .45ACP Hollowpoints in their chest.

hvengel
07-12-2012, 4:10 PM
Seems like a really bad idea. It will be used against you in a court of law. Even a perfectly legit shoot would be played as gruesome drama to a jury of idiots.

This is the same thing that Police officers and their unions said when it was first proposed to add video cameras to police cars. Turns out that this is only an issue for scumbag police officers as most police officers now agree that having these cameras is a good idea that generally works in their favor.

TheExiled
07-12-2012, 4:18 PM
I made something similar for my rifle, but it mounts far back so you can see the whole side

Yugo
07-12-2012, 4:25 PM
Cool idea but lighting is a problem and I have CCTV inside my house so no need for such a device.

Sleighter
07-12-2012, 7:55 PM
Its the privacy of your OWN home,lol not the intruders,lmao! you can do whatever you want in your OWN house!

Your well reasoned and convincingly argued stance has convinced me that the meticulous research done by Librarian above is false. Congratulations on elevating the conversation in this thread. :rolleyes:

goodlookin1
07-12-2012, 8:33 PM
I think when you're breaking into a home, especially with ill intentions, you should NEVER have any expectation to privacy, nor have the right to privacy that supercedes the homeowner's right to THEIR expectation of privacy. It flies in the face of the purpose of owning a home!

Putting a recorder of any sort on a gun should be no different than putting up video cameras around your house. Either way, the event gets recorded regardless of the intended purpose of the recording. There is no way that recording in your own house can be construed as violating someone else's right to their expectation of privacy......UNLESS ***maybe*** if the other person lives in that same home and you are recording them secretly (like in the middle of a nasty divorce or something).

MudCamper
07-12-2012, 9:09 PM
This is the same thing that Police officers and their unions said when it was first proposed to add video cameras to police cars. Turns out that this is only an issue for scumbag police officers as most police officers now agree that having these cameras is a good idea that generally works in their favor.

True but DAs are also very cozy with law enforcement. But citizens are just fodder to increase their conviction statistics, to help their advancement into higher level of politics.

EM2
07-13-2012, 6:48 AM
If people get shot and then receive prompt medical attention (which you summoned when you called the police), nine out of ten of them survive.


This is why shot placement and or shot quantity is important.
After an intruder is shot I am sure I would have a need to investigate & secure the area before calling in the authorities no matter how long that may take.
Just can't be too safe ya know.

Oh by the way I live in the mountains & response time is a minimum of 20-30 minutes.

Lancear15
07-13-2012, 6:57 AM
I doubt that applies to those who have a few 230 grain .45ACP Hollowpoints in their chest.

Ahh the legendary 45ACP.

You're right if they were 9mm +p HPs 9/10 live. 45ACP HPs they all die.

LOL

guns4life
07-13-2012, 6:58 AM
So lame.

Lancear15
07-13-2012, 7:01 AM
Your well reasoned and convincingly argued stance has convinced me that the meticulous research done by Librarian above is false. Congratulations on elevating the conversation in this thread. :rolleyes:

So you think a jury believes a burglar has "reasonable expectation" that "no one is listening in or overhearing the conversation" That is absurd.

Home surveillance camera footage is used all the time in criminal investigations. No?

tenpercentfirearms
07-13-2012, 7:36 AM
Having used Go Pro's on the end of my Benelli, I wouldn't recommend it. The recoil tends to make things go wrong internally and the thing stops working until you can get the battery out and back in. I gave up and for IDPA I always just mount it on my earmuffs. However, I have kind of gotten tired of that even and didn't even record my last regional match.

I like the idea that in a self defense shooting in your own home, your story told through your lawyer and no one else's would be the best story. Recording might help your case or it could hurt it.