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Citadelgrad87
07-10-2012, 2:28 PM
I did a boar hunt in Paso Robles area about 5 years ago, with a rifle.

Recently I took up archery, and am fitting myself out with a compound bow, and would like to take on boars again.

Is there a website that discusses the difference with bowhunting? I see that some stalk, others use stands. For my prior hunt, we tore around a cattle ranch on 4 wheelers until we found something to shoot at.

jmonte35
07-10-2012, 2:42 PM
Very hard to do by yourself of public land with success probably less than .5% If you are newish to archery and want to be successful hire a guide. Usually they will put you in stands with very good success rates.

Spot and stalk can work well but it is very very important to use the wind to your advantage....

There's really no difference other than you need to get much much much closer which requires your tactics to be much more "stealthy"

chicoredneck
07-10-2012, 3:24 PM
IMO pig would be one of the easier species to bow hunt. Their eye sight is terrible and their hearing dosen't seem to be any better than ours IME. Their sense of smell is incredible. If you watch the wind and it is consistent, an experienced hunter should be able to stalk to within bow range pretty easily. I have never bow hunted for pigs, but I have shot several at less than 10 feet with a rifle.

spectr17
07-10-2012, 8:01 PM
Their eye sight is terrible

I disagree having grown up around hogs on the farm. I used to cross a neighbor's hog lot to my deer stand. When I approached the gate the hogs got nervous from about 150 yds out. When I was with the farmer they came up closer to the gate but were still not willing to come close to the gate. When the farmer walked up the gate alone they ran up to the gate to see if he had anything to eat. So at that distance they could tell the difference from him to me. I've snuck up on turkeys who have the best eyes in the woods, it all depends on if they are paying attention and how you move. One of the speakers at the varmint seminar years back at Raauhauges talked about squatting down and doing a gorilla walk to get into rifle range for coyotes in the open areas. Prey animals look for certain shapes/outlines, certain movement or eyes forward on a face that means danger to them. This link has the same opinion on hog eyesight.

http://www.texasboars.com/articles/facts.html

I also believe when you are stalking a group of deer or hogs that once you get in tight they don't pay as much attention to movement in close compared to what's on the treeline around them 50 yds out. Geese and turkeys on the ground are the exceptions IME.

mif_slim
07-10-2012, 9:20 PM
Maybe the pigs smelled you and got nervous. They can tell by scent...

5shot
07-10-2012, 10:03 PM
IMO pig would be one of the easier species to bow hunt. Their eye sight is terrible and their hearing dosen't seem to be any better than ours IME. Their sense of smell is incredible. If you watch the wind and it is consistent, an experienced hunter should be able to stalk to within bow range pretty easily. I have never bow hunted for pigs, but I have shot several at less than 10 feet with a rifle.

Agree 100%. I've shot a lot of pigs with handguns from 10-65 yards. Their eyesight is pretty poor when it comes to stationary objects. But they do detect movement pretty well, and will leave fast if they see you move.
I don't know if their hearing is really bad, or they just make too much noise themselves to notice other sounds. But overall, they are a whole lot easier to stalk then deer.

spectr17
07-10-2012, 11:32 PM
Maybe the pigs smelled you and got nervous. They can tell by scent...

So can deer. That's why I walk into the wind to get to my stand if possible, no need to blow the game out of the area before you get there. I also keep a piece of frayed dental floss on my bows and rifle slings to sense any slight change of the wind. Many times i can feel the wind over my ears which is usually bad news if the game is in front to me. Smoke bottles work but it's too much fumbling with them for me. When I find milkweed seed pods in MO I use them cuz their free and it's cool to watch the seeds float in the air.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Milkweed-in-seed2.jpg/400px-Milkweed-in-seed2.jpg

Know thy enemy. From what the biologists say, from what science says and from my own experience , hogs have good eyesight. They use their sense of smell the most but their hearing and eyes are not something to dismiss.

http://www.pig333.com/what_the_experts_say/pig-vision-and-management-handling_981/

chicoredneck
07-11-2012, 4:20 AM
I disagree having grown up around hogs on the farm. I used to cross a neighbor's hog lot to my deer stand. When I approached the gate the hogs got nervous from about 150 yds out. When I was with the farmer they came up closer to the gate but were still not willing to come close to the gate. When the farmer walked up the gate alone they ran up to the gate to see if he had anything to eat. So at that distance they could tell the difference from him to me. I've snuck up on turkeys who have the best eyes in the woods, it all depends on if they are paying attention and how you move. One of the speakers at the varmint seminar years back at Raauhauges talked about squatting down and doing a gorilla walk to get into rifle range for coyotes in the open areas. Prey animals look for certain shapes/outlines, certain movement or eyes forward on a face that means danger to them. This link has the same opinion on hog eyesight.

http://www.texasboars.com/articles/facts.html

I also believe when you are stalking a group of deer or hogs that once you get in tight they don't pay as much attention to movement in close compared to what's on the treeline around them 50 yds out. Geese and turkeys on the ground are the exceptions IME.

My father is raising some "wild" tame hogs right now. I'm down at his place almost every weakend doing work so I have spent a lot of time around the pigs. They can pick up fast movement, but from what I have observed they can't see detail very well at all. They seem to see better at medium distance than they do up close and far away. It is apparent that they are good at picking up movement and have a wide field of view, but they can't seem to be able to tell what they are looking at untill they smell or hear it. They even seem to have trouble telling what something is right in front of them if they can't smell it (and they can almost always smell "it"). What is amazing is how good their smell is. It seems better than a dogs to me. They have the ability to smell food being prepared inside the house, with all the windows and doors closed, from 70 yards away or more. Sometimes it seems they can even tell when the fridge opens! I have observed them smelling freshwater clams under water and procede to stick their head under water and dig them up.

The pigs like to follow you if you go anywhere, but if you get to far ahead of them, the wind is blowing the wrong direction, and they lose your path, they get nervous and start frantically serarching and calling for you, even if your in plain sight only 40 yards away. Only when you call or make a lot of movement do they find you. If you walk up to them too fast and they don't have a chance to smell you it spooks them untill they realize that you are you.

A couple weeks I was down there a stray labrador was coming onto the property. One of the pigs decided she didn't like the dog and would go on alert when the dog was about 100 yards away, but she clearly could not see the dog based on her behavior. Interestingly enough, after one of the sows was charging and biting the dog to try and run it off, the boar followed the lab and was playing with the dog. The boar and lab had a game of tug-o-war and dig with a large fabric scrap going for almost an hour.

It really is facinating watching them. They are extemely curious animals and will investigate almost anything that does not frighten them. I thought I knew a lot about pigs before, but now I know so much more about their behavior and habits.

Citadelgrad87
07-11-2012, 11:46 AM
To clarify, I envision a guided hunt, the guide I used last time has access to something like 100K of various cattle acreage.

180ls1
07-11-2012, 12:04 PM
I think pigs are fairly easy to stock much easier to stalk up on then deer, elk, turkey, coyotes, ect...

5shot
07-11-2012, 2:01 PM
To clarify, I envision a guided hunt, the guide I used last time has access to something like 100K of various cattle acreage.

Make sure the guide knows you'll be bow hunting. If the land is wide open grassland, he'll probably put you on a well used trail to ambush a pig as it goes to feed or water.
If he's got some oak and brush covered lands, you'll be in a better position to spot and stalk.
Some guides want to get the hunt done real fast, and some don't mind putting in the extra time to make it a enjoyable hunt for you.
Also, since the hunts usually cost you whether you get a pig or not, you may want to bring a rifle for the last day if the bow hunting is not working out.

spectr17
07-11-2012, 7:02 PM
ChicoRN, that's interesting. I had a beagle that tailed me the same way and would bawl when he lost sight of me and caught up. The other issue in the west I find is the wind swirls more with all the canyons, updrafts, downdrafts etc. Pig's nose is sposed to be better than a deer's too.

Another reason I believe hogs can see good is watching their reactions when they spot vehicles. I've watched hogs lock up at Tejon and FHL when they spotted our trucks at 100+ yds and stare until they were comfortable that no one was at the vehicle. I've also pulled over to take pics of hogs way out in a field and when I set up a tripod they hit the jets. Sort of like crows, they won't move until you get out of the truck. I was with a guy at Choppers place one time and we watched hogs down below us check out his truck, when they didn't see anyone they went back to feeding. He thought they had poor eyesight up to that point also.

Richard Erichsen
07-11-2012, 8:43 PM
Very hard to do by yourself of public land with success probably less than .5% If you are newish to archery and want to be successful hire a guide. Usually they will put you in stands with very good success rates.

Spot and stalk can work well but it is very very important to use the wind to your advantage....

There's really no difference other than you need to get much much much closer which requires your tactics to be much more "stealthy"

Wild pigs, with some species in particular, can be dangerous especially if wounded or surprised. Tree stands in areas that are scouted out near a trail, or near feeding stations set up before the season are preferred. They may look cute, but the males have tusks and all of them are sharp toothed and thick skinned. Most mechanical broadheads are not considered reliable enough to get the job done, keep it simple with large 125 grain 3 or 4 blade broadheads and opt for heavier arrows. With a 75 lb. bow, it's recommended to keep within 25 yards. A crossbow in the 200+ lbs range can push it to 35-45 yards maximum, though closer is generally better. When you have waited a few minutes and are getting down to go track, it's often recommended to have at least a large bore handgun or a rifle handy. When you come upon your quarry approach with caution. A large boar can take several minutes to bleed out and can have plenty of fight in them before they go.

Good luck and stay safe.

R

wjc
07-11-2012, 9:09 PM
To clarify, I envision a guided hunt, the guide I used last time has access to something like 100K of various cattle acreage.

PM BigBoarStopper. He has guided pig hunts in the area.

You could search and find some info about his hunts on this forum.

spectr17
07-11-2012, 11:08 PM
One other tip on hunting pigs, many times they squeal really loud when hit. The squeal and thrashing sounds in the brush is a dinner bell and can be heard a long way in a canyon. Cougars and bear hear this and they love pulled pork sammiches too. When your by yourself bent over in the low light gutting the pig just make sure and look behind you and around you occasionally. We had a cat circle our pig at FHL one night and had a guy on a group hunt chase another cat away at Tejon. Also keep a rifle handy, one guy left his at the truck while he dropped down to where the hog was 10 yards away and almost regretted that move when a big kitty came in for a look see.

VFX_man
07-11-2012, 11:33 PM
it's often recommended to have at least a large bore handgun or a rifle handy.
R

FYI - Do know the regulations concerning having a handgun or rifle in your possession while archery hunting. At FHL, if you are in an archery only zone . . . You're not allowed to have anything other than a bow.

Cheers.

MJB
07-12-2012, 10:28 AM
A 45# bow will do the job out to your comfort zone, they are tough but not as bad as ER has mentioned. Boars do have a plate of thick skin and I have seen on some of the older Boars a plate covering HAMS, back and all of the front shoulders the plate can be 1"-2" thick. This is when quartering away is a good shot right behind the last rib!

I've shot plenty of boars at 65 yards with a 50# PSE Nova and 68# Switchback no problem. The one below was in an open field, 52 yard up hill broadside shot. Hit him behind the front shoulder and passed through in front of the back shoulder. Heart and one lung were mush FD 182#.

Good luck on your guided bow hunt pigs are so much fun to hunt get close and let one fly.......and Jesse has some good points from my experiences.

Rusty_Buckhorn
07-12-2012, 12:00 PM
healthy boars will have armor, but nowhere near their vitals. The skin behind the front leg is thinner than deer hide. Don't let all the spooky armor talk scare you.