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View Full Version : AR15 Newbie. Want to learn how to operate. HELP!


sscarr
07-04-2012, 9:52 PM
Want a hands on "basic training" for the AR-15 and do some live firing.

Handguns, shotguns... okay I can handle.
Would love to build an AR like I see everyone else doing.
Bought alot of stuff to build one but, heck, I don't even know how they work.

I've watched videos and read manuals, but my "ADD" requires a hands on FTF beginner's course in the operation of these rifles.

Searched the web for SoCal course and maybe see one in the too far future.

Anyone know of anything or anyone that can help? Always willing to pay for education.

I've been to scared to admit my fear of not knowing, but now it's time to conquer it! :)

Thanks calgunners!

sscarr (IE/OC)

Merc1138
07-04-2012, 10:00 PM
I'm not really aware of anyone offering any classes that wouldn't require you to already have your own rifle(aside from the armed forces of course). If you've already done a bunch of reading/watching, go buy a basic rifle(something like a smith & wesson, you don't need to drop 3 grand) and take a class.

TreeHugger
07-04-2012, 10:02 PM
Would luv to help ya, but i'm in north cal. Glad to see that u r asking questions, only way to learn quicker. Good luck

cntrolsguy
07-04-2012, 10:06 PM
What are you looking for? Instruction on how to build or operate?

sscarr
07-04-2012, 10:21 PM
The build I'm comfortable with. Would love to know how to operate: from loading to chambering to firing to breaking down and cleaning, etc.

Would just like to spend an hour or so with someone to gimme the basics, and then do some live firing and dealing with any issues that might come about.

I would think something like "basic training".

SocomM4
07-04-2012, 10:24 PM
I would totally head to the range and run you through the basics!

What do you have for your build so far?

sscarr
07-04-2012, 10:35 PM
Thank you!!!

The build is done (I think, I did it so long ago 2009?). DoubleStar lower with a CMMG upper, basic .556. I'm even scared it might not work, that's probably why I never taken it out.

I'm in SoCal, would take you up on it in a second.

SocomM4
07-04-2012, 10:45 PM
Do you know how to test the fire controls?

And yeah I'm sure someone will be able to meet you at a local range.
If not , come to Sacramento and make a day of it.

sscarr
07-04-2012, 10:49 PM
I don't know how to test anything. I really don't even know what that means.
HELP!!! :)

Merc1138
07-04-2012, 11:00 PM
Go to youtube, look up: AR-15 function check.

sscarr
07-04-2012, 11:01 PM
Thanks Merc!

SocomM4
07-04-2012, 11:04 PM
Pull your takedown and pivot pins.
Put the selector to the "fire" position.
Pull the trigger and hold it
Push hammer down until it clicks and stops.
It should be held down by the disconnector at this point
if so release the trigger and the hammer should click into the "cocked"
position. Put the selector on safe and verify its working too.

scglock
07-04-2012, 11:05 PM
Google and youtube are your friends! But i'm sure someone in socal is willing to meet you at the range and help you out with your AR! It's pretty basic! Good luck!

JUm3
07-04-2012, 11:09 PM
youtube and google are your friends. If you get the Magpul Dynamics Carbine volume 1. in the extra features they go through the weapons breakdown and 'nomenclature' of the ar15

JUm3
07-04-2012, 11:10 PM
better yet. I just fount it for ya:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSxTu70NDw8

Gl, btw whats the ADD

sscarr
07-04-2012, 11:11 PM
Socom... Cool, OK. will go thru those steps after work tomorrow.

scglock... thank you too!

sscarr
07-04-2012, 11:13 PM
Thanks JU.

Wow, after all these years and all I had to do was "ask".

calgunners... thanks

angrypeccary
07-04-2012, 11:30 PM
hey sscar,

if you want to learn how to sight it in and want to shoot with someone come down to the pala shooting range in temecula im a former member and will probably renew my membership this year. i was in the army and used an m16 for many years. or you can go to any range that allows centerfire rifles and you will find many ar enthusiasts glad to help u out. pretty much everybody at a shootin range has an ar.

Outonthegrind
07-04-2012, 11:40 PM
Me and my girl are on the outs right now so unfortunately so is my Los Angeles apartment..If things get better I generally am in SoCal once or twice a month on the weekends and on holidays. If things turn around I'll bring my new rifle with me and we can hit the range, pay for your own ammo and range fees and ill be happy to show you the ropes..send me a pm with a general reminder of what the situaltion is and what i said I'll do and we'll make it happen..(I doubt that we'll split up for good so its just a matter of time til im back at my other residence,..i just cant say exactly when given the circumstances). Otherwise If you have any questions that dont require hands on instruction hit me up and I'll help the best that I can

The War Wagon
07-04-2012, 11:41 PM
Would love to build an AR like I see everyone else doing.
Bought alot of stuff to build one but, heck, I don't even know how they work.

Mistake #1 :o

1) Buy a complete rifle. You admit, you don't even know how they work, but you want to BUILD one?!?! :eek: No - you DON'T.

2) Buy a QUALITY rifle, for your first purchase, so you can learn the components OF a good rifle. BCM or Colt make above average rifles, for a modest price. Or buy a cheap-azz rifle first, and learn why you didn't want to in the FIRST place, by replacing everything on it that breaks, and spend TWICE what it cost new, to make it ALMOST "as good." http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/slaphead.gif

3) Put all the stuff you just bought, for sale in the classifieds, except for the sling. FWIW, you WON'T get ALL your money back - consider this part of the cost of your AR education. We've ALL done it, so get over being embarassed - it'll probably happen again, when you get to the optic-buying stage.

4) ONCE the rifle arrives, go shoot a MINIMUM of 1,000 rounds, before doing ANYTHING to it - including cleaning. Learn your mechanical sights. Learn the feel of the weapon - get use to the fire controls, how to clear jams (if any) and the like. Find out what kind of ammo it likes, and DOESN'T like. Take notes after each shooting session for future comparison.

5) Dis-assemble, clean, observe, re-assemble. See how & where parts wear - see what jiggles loose first. See how quality parts work together (or, if you went the cheap-azz route, see now what you're going to be replacing soon :o). LEARN your rifle, its parts, and pieces, and become familiar with how to fold flap A back into slot B, before you buy a pile of parts you don't understand, mangle them horribly, and whiz perfectly good money down the drain.

NOW you'll be in a MUCH better position to judge whether you NEED aftermarket gizmos, and what optic will suit you best (CQB, target, competition, safe queen, etc.) in the future.


Or, IGNORE all the preceeding, go out into your driveway, and set twelve (12) $100 bills on fire. It will be mildly entertaining, and MUCH less frustrating, than trying to build a pile of parts you don't understand, into a rifle you're not familiar with. :o

sscarr
07-04-2012, 11:44 PM
angry:

generous offer and I'd like to take you up on it. PM on way.

sscarr
07-04-2012, 11:52 PM
War: thank you! That is a plan that i needed. Sincerely.

Out: thank you for the offer. And, the girl thing... it is just creating a new opportunity.

tonelar
07-04-2012, 11:57 PM
Sscarr
Before you function check:
With the upper off, make sure you don't pull the trigger without manually keeping your hammer from snapping up into your bolt hold open.

sscarr
07-05-2012, 12:01 AM
Okay.

Thanks calgunners. Better get to bed before I'm dealing with what Outonthegrind is!

JUm3
07-05-2012, 12:39 AM
Mistake #1 :o

1) Buy a complete rifle. You admit, you don't even know how they work, but you want to BUILD one?!?! :eek: No - you DON'T.

2) Buy a QUALITY rifle, for your first purchase, so you can learn the components OF a good rifle. BCM or Colt make above average rifles, for a modest price. Or buy a cheap-azz rifle first, and learn why you didn't want to in the FIRST place, by replacing everything on it that breaks, and spend TWICE what it cost new, to make it ALMOST "as good." http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/slaphead.gif

3) Put all the stuff you just bought, for sale in the classifieds, except for the sling. FWIW, you WON'T get ALL your money back - consider this part of the cost of your AR education. We've ALL done it, so get over being embarassed - it'll probably happen again, when you get to the optic-buying stage.

4) ONCE the rifle arrives, go shoot a MINIMUM of 1,000 rounds, before doing ANYTHING to it - including cleaning. Learn your mechanical sights. Learn the feel of the weapon - get use to the fire controls, how to clear jams (if any) and the like. Find out what kind of ammo it likes, and DOESN'T like. Take notes after each shooting session for future comparison.

5) Dis-assemble, clean, observe, re-assemble. See how & where parts wear - see what jiggles loose first. See how quality parts work together (or, if you went the cheap-azz route, see now what you're going to be replacing soon :o). LEARN your rifle, its parts, and pieces, and become familiar with how to fold flap A back into slot B, before you buy a pile of parts you don't understand, mangle them horribly, and whiz perfectly good money down the drain.

NOW you'll be in a MUCH better position to judge whether you NEED aftermarket gizmos, and what optic will suit you best (CQB, target, competition, safe queen, etc.) in the future.


Or, IGNORE all the preceeding, go out into your driveway, and set twelve (12) $100 bills on fire. It will be mildly entertaining, and MUCH less frustrating, than trying to build a pile of parts you don't understand, into a rifle you're not familiar with. :o

i agree with the first 3 steps. but rather than waste ammo on the first 1k rounds. it might do you some good to take a small 1 day class for beginners: like a weapons manipulation class. Maybe no more than 300 rounds and they'll teach you proper stance.

I didnt' have money at the time to take classes, but i benefitted A LOT from the magpul videos and youtube suplements on proper stance, control, trigger press, etc... Id say still watch those videos prior to going to the class. it'll give you some understanding.

Also whats this ADD.\???|???

JUm3
07-05-2012, 12:40 AM
Also a nice fairly used bcm or DD rifles that are going up on the firearms sales section here will help you a whole lot on cost.

sscarr
07-05-2012, 12:43 AM
thanks JU... still haven't gone to bed. shopping for a new AR now!

ADD. the thing they used to call hyperactive when i was a kid. i have a bit of a problem learning from reading of watching video. i'm tactile, need to physically touch it to understand it.

Maddog5150
07-05-2012, 1:28 AM
where in socal are you?

Arkangel
07-05-2012, 5:56 AM
If you can make it to SD I would be glad to help.

KaLiFORNIA
07-05-2012, 6:53 AM
Ill volunteer my services also, if you're around riverside/ Perris area

kcjr1125
07-05-2012, 7:37 AM
i too am a newbie and made an impulse buy on my rifle (sig 556 patrol swat) looks cool just need to fully understand it. i think the videos mentioned is something worthwhile.

Arson
07-05-2012, 11:28 AM
Please use dummy rounds for the function tests, not real rounds.

Also look into taking a basic rifle class.

Fractured
07-05-2012, 11:33 AM
Mistake #1 :o

1) Buy a complete rifle. You admit, you don't even know how they work, but you want to BUILD one?!?! :eek: No - you DON'T.

2) Buy a QUALITY rifle, for your first purchase, so you can learn the components OF a good rifle. BCM or Colt make above average rifles, for a modest price. Or buy a cheap-azz rifle first, and learn why you didn't want to in the FIRST place, by replacing everything on it that breaks, and spend TWICE what it cost new, to make it ALMOST "as good." http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/slaphead.gif

3) Put all the stuff you just bought, for sale in the classifieds, except for the sling. FWIW, you WON'T get ALL your money back - consider this part of the cost of your AR education. We've ALL done it, so get over being embarassed - it'll probably happen again, when you get to the optic-buying stage.

4) ONCE the rifle arrives, go shoot a MINIMUM of 1,000 rounds, before doing ANYTHING to it - including cleaning. Learn your mechanical sights. Learn the feel of the weapon - get use to the fire controls, how to clear jams (if any) and the like. Find out what kind of ammo it likes, and DOESN'T like. Take notes after each shooting session for future comparison.

5) Dis-assemble, clean, observe, re-assemble. See how & where parts wear - see what jiggles loose first. See how quality parts work together (or, if you went the cheap-azz route, see now what you're going to be replacing soon :o). LEARN your rifle, its parts, and pieces, and become familiar with how to fold flap A back into slot B, before you buy a pile of parts you don't understand, mangle them horribly, and whiz perfectly good money down the drain.

NOW you'll be in a MUCH better position to judge whether you NEED aftermarket gizmos, and what optic will suit you best (CQB, target, competition, safe queen, etc.) in the future.


Or, IGNORE all the preceeding, go out into your driveway, and set twelve (12) $100 bills on fire. It will be mildly entertaining, and MUCH less frustrating, than trying to build a pile of parts you don't understand, into a rifle you're not familiar with. :o

I agree with this post.

I also benefited from the magpul dvds, and i will be attending training in august.

wsmc27
07-05-2012, 1:08 PM
sscarr...

High quality training available in SoCal at reasonable fees, and they can include an AR rental if need be.

Check out the Rifle/Carbine 101 at http://www.stcrispian.com/Classes.html

Highly recommended by many who have attended Stans' classes.

Might be better to do such a class, then just blowing off "1,000 rounds" if you have no clue about the AR?
300 or 400 rounds with highly-proficient guidence and training might be more worthwhile?

hth, have fun and be safe. :)

Sbasham
07-05-2012, 1:58 PM
Mistake #1 :o

1) Buy a complete rifle. You admit, you don't even know how they work, but you want to BUILD one?!?! :eek: No - you DON'T.

2) Buy a QUALITY rifle, for your first purchase, so you can learn the components OF a good rifle. BCM or Colt make above average rifles, for a modest price. Or buy a cheap-azz rifle first, and learn why you didn't want to in the FIRST place, by replacing everything on it that breaks, and spend TWICE what it cost new, to make it ALMOST "as good." http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-basic/slaphead.gif

3) Put all the stuff you just bought, for sale in the classifieds, except for the sling. FWIW, you WON'T get ALL your money back - consider this part of the cost of your AR education. We've ALL done it, so get over being embarassed - it'll probably happen again, when you get to the optic-buying stage.

4) ONCE the rifle arrives, go shoot a MINIMUM of 1,000 rounds, before doing ANYTHING to it - including cleaning. Learn your mechanical sights. Learn the feel of the weapon - get use to the fire controls, how to clear jams (if any) and the like. Find out what kind of ammo it likes, and DOESN'T like. Take notes after each shooting session for future comparison.

5) Dis-assemble, clean, observe, re-assemble. See how & where parts wear - see what jiggles loose first. See how quality parts work together (or, if you went the cheap-azz route, see now what you're going to be replacing soon :o). LEARN your rifle, its parts, and pieces, and become familiar with how to fold flap A back into slot B, before you buy a pile of parts you don't understand, mangle them horribly, and whiz perfectly good money down the drain.

NOW you'll be in a MUCH better position to judge whether you NEED aftermarket gizmos, and what optic will suit you best (CQB, target, competition, safe queen, etc.) in the future.


Or, IGNORE all the preceeding, go out into your driveway, and set twelve (12) $100 bills on fire. It will be mildly entertaining, and MUCH less frustrating, than trying to build a pile of parts you don't understand, into a rifle you're not familiar with. :o

I dont agree with your #2, I have a S&W MP15 Sport its on the lower end (price wise) and it works perfect nothing has broken or anything.

If you decide to sell your parts PM me I may be interested in everything but they lower.

sscarr
07-05-2012, 2:31 PM
I think War Wagon's good advice on #2 is in relationship to the fact that I want to build one myself. I put together the lower and bought an upper, which I hardly call a build... That was an assembly (why they call it a "kit"?)

So I understand and appreciate his suggestion that if I want to build something, I should know/learn what quality is and know what I want in a rifle. For instance, when I see some cool, hingeless, hand carved floating interior doors I think, "when I build a house I'm gonna have some of those."

Fractured
07-05-2012, 9:16 PM
What exactly is an "operator" when it comes to firearms?

sscarr
07-05-2012, 10:11 PM
Thank you all for the great feedback!!! I've got a plan now.

1. watch the magpul dvd and scour youtube
2. take a FTF hands on course
3. get a good rifle from a good company
4. and... keep asking calgunners for help! Glad I did.

Much Appreciated!!!

go4kil
07-06-2012, 12:08 PM
i am in the same boat as you. planning to get an AR soon, maybe this coming gun show.

WETP
07-06-2012, 3:19 PM
Want a hands on "basic training" for the AR-15 and do some live firing.

Handguns, shotguns... okay I can handle.
Would love to build an AR like I see everyone else doing.
Bought alot of stuff to build one but, heck, I don't even know how they work.

I've watched videos and read manuals, but my "ADD" requires a hands on FTF beginner's course in the operation of these rifles.

Searched the web for SoCal course and maybe see one in the too far future.

Anyone know of anything or anyone that can help? Always willing to pay for education.

I've been to scared to admit my fear of not knowing, but now it's time to conquer it! :)

Thanks calgunners!

sscarr (IE/OC)

Falcon Operations Group. www.falconops.net

Great training, great trainers, phenomenal guys if you take this business serious. The also host Chris Costa and Costa Ludus in January.

Best luck

Kappy
07-06-2012, 3:44 PM
Once upon a time, parents and teachers got their priorities mixed up, and forgot that some people learn differently from other people. When their "one size fits all" approach didn't fit some of the students, particularly a certain type of boy, they decided that these students' different learning style was actually a mental dysfunction.

They took the children to psychiatrists and demanded that they "fix" the children. The psychiatrists responded by creating a new diagnosis, which at first was called "minimal brain dysfunction" and was later renamed "attention deficit disorder" (ADD). They treated this "disorder" by prescribing amphetamines, such as Ritalin.

The children became much more able to cope with the classroom environment, and were now well-behaved according to the one-size-fits-all standards.

There were no mental or emotional drawbacks or side effects as a result of taking the amphetamines, and the children lived happily ever after.

I know this story because I was one of those children. And in case you didn't notice, that last paragraph was sarcasm. There were serious drawbacks. We didn't live happily ever after, at all. :(I like how teachers are always the lazy bad guys.

Cool story, Bro. Tell it again. This time... with SPECIAL EFFECTS!

JUm3
07-08-2012, 7:20 PM
Sorry guys. I didnt know OP was talking about that 'ADD'. I somehow thought it was some special licensing/permit that required hands on training. -___-

Sleighter
07-08-2012, 7:35 PM
OP, I'm in western San Berdoo county and would be glad to do some hands-on work with you at my place, however I'd rather hold off on the live fire until the 2nd meeting if that works with you. That way we could go over the rifles and have time to fix anything first.

SparkYZ
07-09-2012, 2:12 PM
If you're ever in the San Fernando Valley area, I'd be more than willing to help you learn how to operate, clear stoppages, adjust sights, field strip, etc.