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MountainFF
07-04-2012, 12:39 PM
hey guys,

I have a very nice 7.65 Arg Mauser, looking for some help / opinions on value.

Markings;

Mauser Modelo Argentino 1909
Deutshe Waffen-Und Munitionfabriken Berlin


Matching serial #'s on receiver and barrel
N2xxx

beautiful wood stock, clean barrel and action, feels solid I have not shot it but have a few boxes that I would be including if I decide to sell it.
it's the one on the top without the sling in all shots.

Thanks

Jim

bloodhawke83
07-04-2012, 12:47 PM
Kinda looks like a sporting k98.

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SVT-40
07-04-2012, 5:28 PM
Argentine 1909 rifles were one of the most popular rifles to "sporterize" back in the day. Since this rifle cannot be put back into it's original configuration it's only value is as a shooter. The 7.65 caliber is a good round, however not popular today.

So it's value is probably around $300

bloodhawke83
07-04-2012, 5:30 PM
Guessing op needs to get rechambered into a common round just to get it moving.

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MountainFF
07-04-2012, 9:01 PM
thanks SVT-40, appreciate the input, just curious at this point, haven't even tried to move it yet

donw
07-05-2012, 8:29 AM
it's hard to tell from the pix, but is it a small ring Mauser?

IF it is..don't use any "Hot" hand loads.

i don't recall which models but the 93-96 continued in production up into the 1920's and they were small ring. they were not recommended to be shot with anything but what would be standard loads and were not recommended to be re-barreled in anything but 7x57 or .257 Roberts.

SVT-40
07-06-2012, 3:11 PM
The 1909 rifles are all "large" ring Mauser rifles. Some of the best quality rifles ever made.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-06-2012, 6:03 PM
Argentine 1909 rifles were one of the most popular rifles to "sporterize" back in the day. Since this rifle cannot be put back into it's original configuration it's only value is as a shooter. The 7.65 caliber is a good round, however not popular today.

So it's value is probably around $300

^This

That is pretty much where I would price it. They were one of, if not the best military mausers in terms of fit and finish. But once it has been chopped, it is only a shooter. 7.65 has more ammo commercial available for it today than it has in the past 50-60 years. So it isn't like somebody would have to reload to shoot it. And it is a great cartridge. In a 98 action like that, it can be loaded up to its maximum potential. That puts it smack-dab in between .308 and .30-06. But it is still an oddball cartridge for most shooters. You can go through the trouble of rebarreling it, but that would cost more than the gun is worth. Or you can price it lower than $300 to get it to move quickly. But if you aren't in a hurry, you can put it up on Gunbroker with a $300 reserve and let it ride until somebody buys it. It is a fair enough price for a well-sporterized mauser and scope.

-Mb

bigelectron
07-06-2012, 10:16 PM
The 1909 rifles are all "large" ring Mauser rifles. Some of the best quality rifles ever made.

Its hard to be totally objective about these rifles due to the following:
My dad bought several about 1964? all in cosmoline, gave them to brothers, cousins etc. sporterized them, shot many deer, gave his to me, and its the only gun I have ever hunted with. My son will get it eventually...(sounds like an NRA ad)

I think the 7.65 Argentine cartridge is the perfect balance between a .308 and 30-06. I suppose the others are about right on the value ($300) and its a steal based on how it actually performs.

gun toting monkeyboy
07-06-2012, 11:19 PM
I think the 7.65 Argentine cartridge is the perfect balance between a .308 and 30-06. I suppose the others are about right on the value ($300) and its a steal based on how it actually performs.

I agree. It is a great cartridge. And it was hugely popular 70+ years ago. It even had a large following here in the US. Winchester even made rifles in it. And it captured a large section of the South American market. Argentina, Belgium and Turkey, fairly large powers way back when all adopted it. The main reason it has died out was because between the world wars, 7.92x57 became the standard military export cartridge for the various Mauser rifle manufacturers. Then after WWII, the .30-06 and later .308 became standards. The 7.65 has never been lacking in terms of performance. It just ended up getting pushed out of its niche by similar cartridges with stronger backing. The main reason it has not died out completely is because there are so many surplus rifles out there that still use it. And many, many of them were sold here, ended up sporterized by professionals (not Bubba), and have been handed down as deer rifles for the past 50-60 years.

-Mb