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View Full Version : PVRI 7.62x39 AMMO


Seaweed02
07-02-2012, 9:15 PM
I know it is more expensive, but has anyone ever tried the AK 47 ammo made by PVRI? I have used it for my Remington 7mm mag, and it is very nice and accurate. But I wanted to know how it was with an AK?

Carl.

TacticalPlinker
07-03-2012, 12:44 AM
It's an AK? It will fire and hit the target, what else do you need to know? It takes more than ammo to get match accuracy... It's also non-magnetic and non-corrosive so it's "uptight range legal".

Seaweed02
07-03-2012, 7:09 AM
Tactical plinker,

Thanks for the response, but I am actually looking for someone who may have used the ammo. I spent 24 years of active duty in the military and I have a basic idea of what all is involved in accuracy. Ammo does have a lot to do with it, if the shooter is doing his/her part.

Now I found a thousand rounds of the PRVI 7.62x39 for $516 dollars. That is a little over double what one would pay for a 1000 round case of Wolf ammo. So before I spend that much I thought I would ask for an opinion from somebody who has actually used it.

Carl

CSACANNONEER
07-03-2012, 7:11 AM
The big plus is that it is boxer primed so, it can be reloaded.

Richard Erichsen
07-03-2012, 7:57 AM
I know it is more expensive, but has anyone ever tried the AK 47 ammo made by PVRI? I have used it for my Remington 7mm mag, and it is very nice and accurate. But I wanted to know how it was with an AK?

Carl.

More expensive than what? Old milsurp? There are a lot of good loads made in the last decade with some very good indeed.

Prvi Partizan is still cheaper than Winchester, Remington and Federal and properly conforms to CIP specs, is consistent and of good quality. Prvi Partizan is Serbian (formerly part of Yugoslavia) and for all intents and purposes is modern "Yugo" M67 FMJ ball with a non-corrosive primer. The same plants produced ammo used by Serbian troops during the Yugoslavian civil war.

If you zeroed your rifle with Yugo M67 milsurp, it will fire to point of aim with modern PPU M67 as well. As other posters have mentioned, the cases are reloadable so that the initial costs can be compensated with many reloads. I've heard folks going through 8-10 reloads on PPU brass without difficulty.

Enjoy and stay safe.

R

Yemff
07-03-2012, 8:22 AM
I know it is more expensive, but has anyone ever tried the AK 47 ammo made by PVRI? I have used it for my Remington 7mm mag, and it is very nice and accurate. But I wanted to know how it was with an AK?

Carl.

Tactical plinker,

I spent 24 years of active duty in the military and I have a basic idea of what all is involved in accuracy. Ammo does have a lot to do with it, if the shooter is doing his/her part.

Carl

If you have a basic idea, you should know accuracy and AK don't really mix

Richard Erichsen
07-03-2012, 9:28 AM
If you have a basic idea, you should know accuracy and AK don't really mix

I don't really agree with that. Accuracy is relative and as soon as you throw the shooter into it, the rifle and ammo will virtually always be more accurate than the shooter that is throwing human error into the mix.

The Sovs and most Warsaw Pact (and in deference to Yugoslavia, unaligned nations) spec'd accuracy on paper at 4MOA at 100 meters from a bench, giving some indication of what was considered acceptable from ammo and rifle.

In my rifles, Yugo milsurp and Golden Tiger outshoot me by a considerable margin and easily under 3MOA consistently. Loads from Prvi Partizan are about the same as the other two mentioned, while Fiocchi and Lapua are slightly superior in my experience. I only tried a 20 round box of the Lapua once and never bought it again due to the extravagance of spending close to $60 on FMJ. You can sometimes find Fiocchi for the same price as Winchester and Winchester shoots no better than Tula in my rifles.

In order to find what you rifle "likes" buy up 20 round boxes and take notes during your range visits. When you find the ammo your rifle likes, you can decide to stick with it or not as your budget allows. Many AK shooters buy whatever is cheapest at the time and don't do the experimentation you are, so kudos to you for that.

If you reload, the modern brass cased stuff is a candidate for as many as a dozen reloads.

R

CSACANNONEER
07-03-2012, 9:35 AM
If you have a basic idea, you should know accuracy and AK don't really mix

Why not? You do understand that "Accuracy" is ONLY a matter of site adjustment, don't you?

In case you don't have a basic idea of what "accuracy" is", I'll include this. It'll also help in case you don't understand what "precision" is.:p

http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p43/csacannoneer/accuracy_vs_precision_556.jpg

As you can plainly see, "accuracy" has nothing to do with group size which is often measured in moa. Any AK can be just as accurate as any other rifle by just adjusting the POA to be centered around the POI.

6mmintl
07-03-2012, 12:00 PM
AK's are not accuracy platforms, but can be with better sight and more so with significant modification.

The cartridge on the other hand is extremely accurate when handloaded in .308 barrels of appropriate twist and using .308 bullets .

Richard Erichsen
07-03-2012, 3:28 PM
AK's are not accuracy platforms, but can be with better sight and more so with significant modification.

The cartridge on the other hand is extremely accurate when handloaded in .308 barrels of appropriate twist and using .308 bullets .

I'm not sure I follow why the barrel or handloaded bullets need to be .308 instead of .311. There are resizing dies for squishing a .308 bullet into the right size if the bullet is worth the extra trouble. Selection is considerably more limited, but there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with being a few thou bigger than homegrown .30 cals.

R

Seaweed02
07-04-2012, 7:05 AM
Hello, and thank you Richard for your helpfull posts. And thank you to all who posted helpfull replies. I agree with you Richard. I think that the right ammo should make a difference.

I actually saw it yesterday at the range when I took my son and my new Zastava to test it out. I am injured right now, so I couldn't shoot it myself. But my son shot it instead and I got to see how it did. I bought some Winchester, some American Eagle, some Tula, and some Wolf.

I had to adjust the sights because the rifle was shooting a little to the left and a little high. But once I had it zeroed in it was fairly accurate depending on which ammo we used.

From the 100 yard line it shot a 5-6 inch group of about 25 shots with the Wolf and Tula ammo, although it failed to load a couple of the Tula rounds. NO problems with the Wolf but unfortuneatly I had to sneak the Wolf shots because the range didn't allow the metal cored bullets. But the Best of the day was from the American Eagle. My son got about a 4=5 inch group with 20 shots bench rested from 100 yards. The Winchester simply sucked. There really were no groups with the Winchester ammo, it looked like a very large shotgun blast. I'll never buy it again.

I want to try out Sellior & Bellot, Fiochi, Hornady, PRVI Partizan, and even the M67 corrosive ammo.

I'll keep you posted.

Richard Erichsen
07-04-2012, 4:25 PM
Hello, and thank you Richard for your helpfull posts. And thank you to all who posted helpfull replies. I agree with you Richard. I think that the right ammo should make a difference.

I actually saw it yesterday at the range when I took my son and my new Zastava to test it out. I am injured right now, so I couldn't shoot it myself. But my son shot it instead and I got to see how it did. I bought some Winchester, some American Eagle, some Tula, and some Wolf.

I had to adjust the sights because the rifle was shooting a little to the left and a little high. But once I had it zeroed in it was fairly accurate depending on which ammo we used.

From the 100 yard line it shot a 5-6 inch group of about 25 shots with the Wolf and Tula ammo, although it failed to load a couple of the Tula rounds. NO problems with the Wolf but unfortuneatly I had to sneak the Wolf shots because the range didn't allow the metal cored bullets. But the Best of the day was from the American Eagle. My son got about a 4=5 inch group with 20 shots bench rested from 100 yards. The Winchester simply sucked. There really were no groups with the Winchester ammo, it looked like a very large shotgun blast. I'll never buy it again.

I want to try out Sellior & Bellot, Fiochi, Hornady, PRVI Partizan, and even the M67 corrosive ammo.

I'll keep you posted.

There are a metric crapload of loads in 7.62x39 mm right now - a great time to be a user of a rifle in the caliber. At last count there were over 40, including major and many minor ammunition manufactures fitting every possible niche and role. A friend of mine swears by BVAC (Hornady bullets in Winchester or Federal brass cases with a more spritely charge), which you can get from Cheaper Than Dirt and elsewhere. I haven't tried any yet and he's too cheap to let me use any of his.

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/AMM-627

There is also the Korean PMC (sometimes reported as great stuff), Hungarian and Russian MFS, Silver Bear, Brown Bear (known informally as "The Bears" - Barnaul), Ulyanovsk, Golden Tiger (Vympel), etc. Most make an FMJ, an HP and some make SP and more specialized loads as well. If you care to know what works best, a 20 round box of most of the above will be <$20. Lapua's offerings are as close to match grade as are likely to be made commercially in the caliber at three times the cost of anything else.

What works best in my rifle won't necessarily work best in yours. The process of finding the right load is generally a lot of fun, not terribly expensive and fairly educational.

Enjoy.

R

Seaweed02
07-04-2012, 8:19 PM
I will eventually try every brand I can get my hands on. Today I ordered a case of the M67 Yugoslavian Ammo. I know it is corrosive, and I will be careful, but I already use corrosive ammo in my Mauser and my Enfield.

I hope the M67 is good stuff. It sure was cheap at $259 for 1260 rounds of ammo.

Take care

Carl.

Richard Erichsen
07-05-2012, 11:57 AM
I will eventually try every brand I can get my hands on. Today I ordered a case of the M67 Yugoslavian Ammo. I know it is corrosive, and I will be careful, but I already use corrosive ammo in my Mauser and my Enfield.

I hope the M67 is good stuff. It sure was cheap at $259 for 1260 rounds of ammo.

Take care

Carl.

Enjoy the Yugo M67 while it lasts. We must be coming up on the last few million rounds by now. Corrosive as mentioned is a non-issue. If you live in the desert as so many of us in Cali do, the humidity is generally low and the salts will just hang out doing nothing in particular. The only oddity you'll have to get over is pouring water through your barrel and gas system, which may not be something you've ever done before. You'll be fine, it's only water and you'll be drying it before you're done.

Cleaning your rifle after firing it is part of the sport and take minutes to "wipe and plumb the pipe". If it is taking longer than 15 minutes to clean the weapon to "good enough" you're doing it wrong.

R

PEZHEAD265
07-05-2012, 9:00 PM
I'm not sure I follow why the barrel or handloaded bullets need to be .308 instead of .311. There are resizing dies for squishing a .308 bullet into the right size if the bullet is worth the extra trouble. Selection is considerably more limited, but there doesn't appear to be anything wrong with being a few thou bigger than homegrown .30 cals.

R

To clear it up for you 7.62 the way americans measure it comes out to .308.The foreign measure of 7.62 is .311.If you shoot .308 bullets out of a .311 barrel accuracy will suffer.Some barrels are .308 and some are .311.

chead
07-05-2012, 9:35 PM
It's 2012, an AK with a quality barrel (which should be just about all of them) will shoot really well with nice ammo and mediocre with everything else.

Richard Erichsen
07-06-2012, 7:34 AM
To clear it up for you 7.62 the way americans measure it comes out to .308.The foreign measure of 7.62 is .311.If you shoot .308 bullets out of a .311 barrel accuracy will suffer.Some barrels are .308 and some are .311.

I don't think that is what he was saying, I am awaiting his response.

You can use a .303" bore/.311" land barrel to produce a respectable rifle and many makers have. My point was you do not need to handload using .308 bullets and use .308 barrels to do so. The selection is far more limited, but precision made match-grade blanks exist and a decent selection of bullets in the proper size can be sourced, or resized from more common .308 projectiles to squash them into .311" diameter.

R