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View Full Version : Rebarreled M1 garand?


ssteve
06-29-2012, 8:56 PM
I have a chance to get a M1 garand(Springfield) that's in great shape. Looks all original(key word "looks") as its been rebarreled to a .308 and the stock was refinished. I trust the owner in him saying it shoots and functions great. So I'm wondering if there might be any major concerns down the road, what kind of aftermarket support is there and what kind of value would you put on it? The owner wants $500, which to me sound like a pretty good deal on a great looking and functional rifle. I'm not looking for long term collector value but considering I tend to buy and sell things a bit I would like to not loose any money if I go to sell it down the road.

smoothy8500
06-29-2012, 9:14 PM
If it functions well, I'd say it's a good deal. Even if it's a "Blue Sky" or Arlington Armory import the price is still good.

Dead*Reckoned
06-29-2012, 9:34 PM
Doo it!

forgiven
06-30-2012, 4:21 AM
^^^I would!

Moress
06-30-2012, 4:37 AM
500 is a good price for a Garand. Is it Springfield armor, or Springfield armory inc though?

PEZHEAD265
06-30-2012, 5:06 AM
500 isn't a bad price for it.If you have any concerns about it functions see if he will meet you at the range.CMP wants 995.00 for there 308 garands so 500 is a steel.

ssteve
06-30-2012, 5:15 AM
receiver reads:

U.S Rifle
cal .30 M1
Springfield
Armory
2717xxx

Sailormilan2
06-30-2012, 5:18 AM
As long as the receiver isn't a welded receiver, $500 is a steal. I'd snap it up, and I'm not looking for one. The only real difference between a 30-06 Garand and a 308 Garand is the barrel.
Unless it is a USGI Garand that was modified by the Italians, then there are a couple of other parts that have been changed too.
As for support, you shouldn't have to worry about that. A Garand is about as bullet proof as you can get.
As an added bonus, the 308 Garand recoils less than a standard 30-06 Garand.

30Cal
06-30-2012, 5:33 AM
...
As an added bonus, the 308 Garand recoils less than a standard 30-06 Garand.

???? 150gr bullet doing 2750fps vs 150gr bullet doing 2750fps. Sir Isaac Newton says recoil will be essentially the same.

ssteve
06-30-2012, 5:41 AM
Im not concerned about recoil in the least since its just a .308. Not sure on what has or hasnt been modified but I trust the owner in saying its reliable since I have dealt with him and purchased several other firearms from him before.

30Cal
06-30-2012, 7:41 AM
Typically, it's simply a different barrel. Some rifles will have the plastic spacer inserted into mag well that keeps you from getting a clip of 30-06 inside. That's all there is to it.

Crunch130
06-30-2012, 8:07 AM
It really all depends on the condition. Pics would be nice. $500 is not too bad a price, not a "steal" but ok.


Check the calendar! The year is 2012. AND this is California, where C&R's sell for higher prices. What would you consider a "steal" in today's market? Ripping off the widow of a gun collector for $200?

$500 is a SPECTACULAR price. With a couple of "Ifs."

If it's a USGI receiver, and it sounds like it is, proceed to the next step. Even the Springfield Armory Inc Garands are OK (investment cast vs USGI forged). The receivers to avoid by name are the Federal Ordnance. Those are poor-quality cast copies that some work OK, some don't.

If it's USGI and not rewelded (very simple to pull the barreled action out of the stock & check) or otherwise not worn out, and the rest of the rifle cycles and feeds properly, you're good to go. I'd be real surprised if someone took the trouble to put a .308 barrel on a gun that was otherwise worn out.

If the Garand is a worn out piece of junk, I wouldn't pay anything for it. I say that because I've seen unsuspecting guys getting their first Garand and trying to shoot it, and having nothing but problems because the receiver and major action parts were worn way out of tolerance. Big 5 sold a bunch of Garands a few years ago re-imported from somewhere in S. America, for $800 each, that were worn out, heavily corroded walhangers. And many (not all) of the Korean Blue Sky re-imports were put together with nicely-refinished worn out parts.

At that price, you can even replace a really beat stock for around $100.

What are you waiting for?

Crunch

Sailormilan2
06-30-2012, 11:01 AM
???? 150gr bullet doing 2750fps vs 150gr bullet doing 2750fps. Sir Isaac Newton says recoil will be essentially the same.

Recoil is also dependent on the powder weight. The 308 has less powder, therefore recoil. Most owners of 308 Garands report less felt recoil than with a 30-06 Garand.
E = 1/2 (Wr / 32) (Wb x MV + 4700 x Wp / 7000 x Wr)squared. Where E = recoil Energy in ft. lbs., Wr = Weight of rifle in pounds, Wb = Weight of bullet in grains, MV = Muzzle Velocity of bullet in feet-per-second, Wp = Weight of powder in grains.
The recoil on an M14 style rifle is usuall reported as stiffer/sharper than that of the Garand , but that is due to the different gas system that is used on the M14 style rifle.

Again, $500 is an excellant price when the going rate from the CMP for their Field grade ( which is one step above their rack grade, aka clunker grade, probably shot out barrel grade) is $525. $995 for a Garand with a new cal 308 barrel. If the receiver is a decent and not a welded receiver, the price is very good.

If you don't want it, let me know where it is and I will get it.

OldShooter32
06-30-2012, 11:12 AM
Having trouble swallowing the "weight of powder" argument unless you are talking about the same powder. Twenty grains of Bullseye vs 20 grains of 4831 doesn't calculate...

Sailormilan2
06-30-2012, 2:24 PM
Having trouble swallowing the "weight of powder" argument unless you are talking about the same powder. Twenty grains of Bullseye vs 20 grains of 4831 doesn't calculate...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recoil

Including the ejected gas

The backward momentum applied to the firearm is actually equal and opposite to the momentum of not only the projectile, but the ejected gas created by the combustion of the charge as well. Likewise, the recoil energy given to the firearm will affected by the ejected gas. By conservation of mass, the mass of the ejected gas will be equal to the original mass of the propellant. As a rough approximation, the ejected gas can be considered to have an effective exit velocity of where is the muzzle velocity of the projectile and is approximately constant. The total momentum of the propellant and projectile will then be:

where: is the mass of the propellant charge, equal to the mass of the ejected gas.

This expression should be substituted into the expression for projectile momentum in order to obtain more a more accurate description of the recoil process. The effective velocity may be used in the energy equation as well, but since the value of α used is generally specified for the momentum equation, the energy values obtained may be less accurate. The value of the constant α is generally taken to lie between 1.25 and 1.75. It is mostly dependent upon the type of propellant used, but may depend slightly on other things such as the ratio of the length of the barrel to its radius.