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mdib870
06-21-2012, 6:00 PM
im intrested in getting a plate carrier and some plates saw this and looked like a good deal....the only thing is .it looks like the plates aren't contoured meaning they look flat ....show me whats available I've got a 350$ budget + or minus 30bux

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Swat-Body-Armor-Level-III-10-x-12-Steel-Plates-Tactical-A-TACS-Carrier-/150837351566?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item231e9b548e#ht_1261wt_995

Dhena81
06-21-2012, 6:35 PM
Save up save some weight and get ceramic if you think you need BA not to mention for some reason I could never see myself buying BA on ebay.

If you want full protection point blank level IV BA expect to pay over 1k for just the plates.

stix213
06-21-2012, 6:44 PM
A lot of places don't like to sell body armor to non-LEO. I haven't bought rifles plates, but I bought some IIIA inserts for a plate carrier from the below website. Was a good deal, and I had no issues with the order. They have rifles plates as well. Sorry I can't be more help.

gearzoneproducts.com

For a set of quality rifles plates I'd think your budget is a little low though.

mdib870
06-21-2012, 6:45 PM
wish i had the money...i know the ar500 steel is good steel they make targets with them and they have a pretty long service like as steel targets.....what I'm wondering is if anyone makes contoured steel plates ....ceramic is nice i like the fact of weight savings but ceramic has a wear life as steel dosent after a few hits on ceramic the ceramic tends to break up and has a tendency to fracture

rero360
06-21-2012, 6:47 PM
ditch steel, thats 1990s tech if that. Look at the Velocity System plates on SKD, $300 a piece.

Only way I would use steel plates would be if they were contoured and it would be for training only, more weight, totally shred you on a run.

problemchild
06-21-2012, 6:47 PM
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=498169

Ziggy91
06-21-2012, 6:51 PM
You give me about $100 and I'll cut some aluminum at my shop, spray paint "Level III Body Armor" on em, then make millions on Ebay from mall ninjas...

Buy direct.

mreed
06-21-2012, 6:59 PM
lol how do these threads ALWAYS end up in the centerfire rifles section...

trigger hippie
06-21-2012, 7:27 PM
Thought of these?

http://www.amazon.com/Titanium-Steel-Multi-Hit-Plates-x12/dp/B002O17TD4/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&coliid=I282C8XZCZGPKZ&colid=Y7ZDQ6ECN3TX

They've been on my Amazon wishlist for a while now. Don't know what actual daily wearers would think of them though. Seems like they'd be awfully heavy.

mdib870
06-21-2012, 7:32 PM
Some protection is better then no protection at all

tomd1584
06-21-2012, 8:03 PM
Lighter = expensive

Quality = expensive

Body armor ain't cheap. Especially quality plates. Either spend the cash or settle for a heavy, steel plate. Oh, and buy from a quality vendor. I wouldnt be buying something my life depended on from eBay or amazon, sorry.

Bulletproofme.com
Skdtac.com

chead
06-21-2012, 8:09 PM
If you want to cheap on armor, you don't need armor.

readysetgo
06-21-2012, 8:20 PM
Have you seen these?
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?p=7258860#post7258860
Calguns vendor, 400 bucks double sided level 4 hybrid, sounds like the winner!

trigger hippie
06-21-2012, 8:20 PM
If you want to cheap on armor, you don't need armor.

Yeah, I kind of agree. Besides the odd 0.01% probability social collapse scenario (which some people take quite seriously and perhaps rightfully so, not to diminish that) I can't see going anywhere I would be likely to be shot at. But there's a little part in the back of my mind that thinks about things like TEOTWAWKI; perhaps like other non-paranoid gun owners I find a balance between low-probability/high impact preparedness and high-probability/low-impact daily cost of living by comparing how much it costs for stuff that I might count on for my life in certain scenarios of varying (low) probability...

There's this point where dignity outweighs survival. Like wearing a plate carrior and level 3 plates at a range. Living life at the admittedly safe and plush end of things body armor seems kind of like something you *might* want to have on hand.

What really stops is me is what my roommates or neighbors (or local law enforcement if they by any chance got wind of what I was purchasing) might think. It's bad enough I have guns and reloading equipment.

mdib870
06-21-2012, 8:42 PM
Well in the highly unlikely event of a social uprising I would like to be prepard ...I'm looking for input I get that these plates come from an eBay vendor but does Nij testing hold any credibility at all ...'they are supposed to be held to a standard right ? Remember I'm looking for frendly insight from fellow gunnies by no means will I try and break any law I have family law enforcement and respect the law

brando
06-21-2012, 8:47 PM
The only reason to wear steel was because ceramic plates were too think for low-vis rigs. That's no longer the case. What you're willing to spend on body armor says a lot about how much you value your life and/or your knowledge of said armor.

mdib870
06-21-2012, 8:54 PM
I admit I know nothing about armor I'm a college student and don't make much but this is why I'm here seeking info...please educate me

mdib870
06-21-2012, 9:04 PM
The reason I'm looking Into steel plates is that I've heard people dropping ceramic plates and cracking or fracturing the ceramic

brando
06-21-2012, 9:27 PM
Yeah, ceramic plates can't be tossed around like steel, but it's not a big deal. Ask anyone who's been downrange and they'll tell you, "yeah, I just don't throw my plates off of the vehicle when we get back."

Body armor as a whole, be it soft panels or plates, has a shelf life. Most will be rated for about 10 years with normal use. Soft armor panels and certain kinds of plates, particularly the earlier ceramics that were using lots of polyethylene, can be adversely affected by cumulative heat exposure (ie run & gun in the desert for a year). So when you consider putting a rig together, keep in mind that its protective level will be limited over time. I've been out of the game for a few years now, so things might have started to change in that area. But for the most part, the materials used to make soft panels and plates haven't changed a whole lot in the last six or seven years.

When choosing a plate, keep in mind that many are rated as "in-conjunction", which means they need to be worn with a level IIIa soft panel between you and the plate. The reason for this is spall protection; bits of the plate can break off and become injuring or lethal projectiles into your body. Most of the lighter plates are like that and it's especially true of steel (nothing spalls like steel).

So a lot of people start with a pistol/shotgun protective IIIa vest. From there you can add an inconjunction Level III plate set for rifle protection. IIIa vests are very insulating, so if you're operating in a hot/humid environment you may want to skip the IIIa vest and just get IIIa panels cut for a plate carrier. Also a full vest and plates, while more protective, can be more cumbersome (unless you train for it), making certain kinds of motion tricky like getting in and out of vehicles, climbing a wall or chasing a booger eater. That's where plate carriers generally come it - more maneuverable, but less protective.

For soft armor, Level IIIa is the way to go. Level II is pointless - more cons than pros.

For plates, Level III in-conjunction is basically the best of both worlds. They can be made light weight (you pay more for less weight too) and will stop most common threats. Level IV is armor piercing protective and generally much heavier (6lbs vs 4lbs). Standalone plates are generally the heaviest and most protective, not requiring IIIa panels to be worn with them. And again, money will play a role in getting the same protection for lighter weight.

epcii
06-21-2012, 9:28 PM
That's the same stuff used on steel targets. They also ricochet bullets. I'd look into ceramic plates if I were you. I see lightweight lvl 3's for about the same price all the time.

mdib870
06-21-2012, 9:43 PM
What are some credible ceramic and steel plates and or plates used into conjunction with soft armor

Hey Brando thanks for the info brotha

problemchild
06-22-2012, 4:50 AM
The reason I'm looking Into steel plates is that I've heard people dropping ceramic plates and cracking or fracturing the ceramic

Thats why you run level 3 with titanium plates.

Untamed1972
06-22-2012, 7:23 AM
Just saw recently US Cavalry has ceramic plates for $180 each. Carrier of your choice would be extra. I think I have a 15% off coupon code for them at home too.

rero360
06-22-2012, 8:24 AM
http://m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=85112 Read this, tells you how to properly wear armor.

http://m4carbine.net/forumdisplay.php?f=14&order=desc Too many threads to pick from, but 150 pages of threads on gear, plenty on armor, types and quality.

I suggest you do some reading and research and then use your best judgement in picking the plates, it is your life that will depend on them, not mine or anyone else's here.

as for good places to buy from, Grey Group, SKD Tactical and Bulletproofme come to mind but I'm sure there are others.

gun toting monkeyboy
06-22-2012, 11:45 AM
I know a guy that is starting an armor company, and I have been helping out a lot with testing. A rough job, I know. Nothing like going out to the range to try to blow holes in things. But, I have learned quite a bit about armor over the past year or so doing it.

Plates are nice, but they are heavy and bulky. That being said, if you are willing to put up with that, they can offer a lot of protection. They normally come in 3 or 4 flavors, each with it's own pros and cons. They are rated for different threat levels, so be sure to look at the fine print when you are buying them. The ones that are rated as "Stand Alone" do not need anything under them to give you their rated level of protection. The ones that state that they need to be used in conjunction with a Level IIIA vest MUST be worn on top of a Level IIIA vest to stop whatever threat they are rated for. Without the vest, they will NOT give you protection for their rated threats. This means that if you are using a Level III plate that is not stand alone, and you don't have the vest under it, it will not stop 7.62x51 or 5.56 rounds. It will slow them down, and probably break them up some, they most of them are going to go zipping through. Not a good thing.

Here is a quick breakdown:

Metal: These offer good protection from penetration. They are also very durable, and can normally survive multiple hits, being dropped, or years sitting in a hot car trunk. And they are thinner than the other plates. They can usually be had for about half the cost of other plates with similar levels of protection. The main downsides are that they are heavy (read: really, really heavy) compared to other plates, and they have a problem with ricochets and bullet splatter. It is great if it stops the incoming round. But not so great if it bounces it, or large fragments of it up into your neck or face. That would generally be considered to be bad.

Synthetic: These are hard plates made of one type of bullet resistant fiber or another and resin to add strength/hold it all together. Be it Kevlar, Spectra or UHMWPE . These are the lightest of the plates, but also the bulkiest. Normally you can only find these up to Level III Stand Alone. Trying to make them thick enough to stop Level IV threats would make them too thick to fit in most carriers. These are, however, fairly durable. Dropping them or banging them isn't a problem, as they are unlikely to crack or break from rough handling. They do normally have a limited life span though. Most manufacturers recommend replacing them after 5 years. They will last much longer than that, but they do degrade over time.

Ceramic: These are made of one of several types of hard ceramic material. They are lighter than metal, but still heavy. They are bulkier than metal plates, but not as bulky as the pure synthetic plates. These can be made to hold up to Level IV threats and still be thin enough to fit in most plate carriers. The down side to these is that they can break if you drop them. And you are supposed to have them x-rayed every so often to make sure that they have not cracked or broken.

Composite: These are plates made of two or more of the other materials. Usually metal or ceramic with outer and inner layers of synthetic material to both add protection and absorb any fragments or ricochets. These still end up being heavier than the straight synthetic plates, but are also able to handle higher threat levels. And because they have the synthetic material protecting the inner layers on the ones made with ceramic, they are much less prone to breaking when dropped.

If you are looking at getting plates, try to figure out what threat level you are likely to need, and what kind of conditions you are likely to need them for. Then look around to see what fits both your needs and your budget. If all you can afford is metal, then go with metal. If you are unlikely to be facing .30-06 level Armor Piercing rounds, then you probably don't need a Level IV plate. Save yourself some money and weight and go with a Level III plate. If you are planning on using the plate without a soft Level IIIA panel underneath it, be sure that you get one that is rated as a "Stand Alone" plate.

tomd1584
06-22-2012, 12:54 PM
Thats why you run level 3 with titanium plates.

Or just don't throw your **** on the concrete ground. :cool2:

gun toting monkeyboy
06-22-2012, 1:20 PM
Or just don't throw your **** on the concrete ground. :cool2:

And the titanium, which is really nifty, still spits chunks of copper and lead all over the place. With the angle that most metal plates sit at while being worn, the odds of it bouncing stuff up towards yout face and neck are just too danged high for me. Even a small nick in the carotid would ruin your whole day.

-Mb

gun toting monkeyboy
06-22-2012, 9:21 PM
Should I ask him about the price for a composite plate group buy? If there is any interest, he should be willing to cut us a deal. And should I post something about this in group buys to see if people would want to do it?

-Mb

tomd1584
06-23-2012, 9:04 AM
Should I ask him about the price for a composite plate group buy? If there is any interest, he should be willing to cut us a deal. And should I post something about this in group buys to see if people would want to do it?

-Mb

Let's see some specs first (sizes, weight, thickness, etc).

h0use
06-23-2012, 10:54 AM
look up steel defender plates.

Excitable Boy
06-23-2012, 11:17 AM
Have you seen these?
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?p=7258860#post7258860
Calguns vendor, 400 bucks double sided level 4 hybrid, sounds like the winner!

What are some credible ceramic and steel plates and or plates used into conjunction with soft armor

Hey Brando thanks for the info brotha

The ones noted above are credible composite plates and from my research, one of the best buys out there. Keep in mind, however, that they are Air Save cut, which means a little more protection as they don't have the corners cut at an angle like a Shooter's Cut design, but that also makes shouldering a long arm a little less comfortable. If it's for use in the event of SHTF and not regular wear, you'll be hard pressed to find level IV stand alone armor with carrier from a reputable supplier in that price range.

tomd1584
06-23-2012, 11:26 AM
The ones noted above are credible composite plates and from my research, one of the best buys out there. Keep in mind, however, that they are Air Save cut, which means a little more protection as they don't have the corners cut at an angle like a Shooter's Cut design, but that also makes shouldering a long arm a little less comfortable. If it's for use in the event of SHTF and not regular wear, you'll be hard pressed to find level IV stand alone armor with carrier from a reputable supplier in that price range.

Airsave plates are single curve and heavy.

technique
06-23-2012, 11:35 AM
Pretty much everything has been covered here, and is fairly accurate.

I've run a buttload of different plates, never run metal/metallic plates though.
I'd rather the round be absorbed into the armor, rather than fragged in my face/throat/dick.

Currently I am running composite plates, 2 sets in 2 different rigs. Unless they invent
something lighter in weight and stronger (1 set is 2.5lbs ea. the other is 3lbs ea.),
I'd never consider running anything else. ADI is what I use.

Good luck in your armor buying endeavor.

gun toting monkeyboy
06-23-2012, 11:36 AM
Let's see some specs first (sizes, weight, thickness, etc).

No problem. I am having him starting a group buy for Zombie Squad. We should be able to combine our numbers with theirs to get to the minimum for a group buy. I will get pics of the plates, the NIJ certs, and pricing. It looks like it will be a choice of Level III and Level IV stand alone composite plates. I will post when I get actual details.

-Mb

tomd1584
06-23-2012, 11:58 AM
No problem. I am having him starting a group buy for Zombie Squad. We should be able to combine our numbers with theirs to get to the minimum for a group buy. I will get pics of the plates, the NIJ certs, and pricing. It looks like it will be a choice of Level III and Level IV stand alone composite plates. I will post when I get actual details.

-Mb

Great, thanks. That way I can upgrade my wife's rig with my current SAPI's, (she has IIIa only right now), and get myself something new. :D